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Old 03-19-2018, 01:13 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,914 posts, read 11,589,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I think the only way to get definite answers is to have the water tested, and if it was me bidding on it I'd want to get the soil tested too. But if in fact there are healthy fish and other flora and fauna living naturally in and nearby that water then it's probably a good bet that it's safe.
There are healthy-looking plants and animals at Chernobyl; they're just a bit radioactive.
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Old 03-19-2018, 03:11 AM
 
Location: somewhere flat
1,375 posts, read 1,287,424 times
Reputation: 4106
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhbj03 View Post
Attachment 196206

Attachment 196207

From shore it looks like kind of normal, but still not crystal clear, and from air under the sun it really looks green.....
No. That is algae, it is caused by man and it is not natural.
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Old 03-19-2018, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,749 posts, read 65,558,358 times
Reputation: 32915
Assume it is polluted.

Get it tested after you buy it.

If it is not toxic - you get a bonus surprise.

If it is toxic, do not swim or fish in it. Just get some ducks and swans. If your swans turn green stay away from it.

Still a beautiful piece of property.

BTW, if it is toxic, anyone in the ownership chain can be liable to clean it up. See if the mining company is still around.
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Old 03-19-2018, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Near Luxembourg
1,915 posts, read 1,058,138 times
Reputation: 1347
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhbj03 View Post
Attachment 196206

Attachment 196207

From shore it looks like kind of normal, but still not crystal clear, and from air under the sun it really looks green.....
No very suprinsing. Powder of Leprechaun.


This color is very common. I see it everywhere in french Pyrénées and Alpes. White-Blue lakes as well as extremely clear lakes are much more rare.

Last edited by Pokitobounto; 03-19-2018 at 05:29 PM..
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Old 03-20-2018, 10:22 AM
 
16,833 posts, read 14,718,223 times
Reputation: 20773
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhbj03 View Post
Thanks for the very detailed technical information. Can I ask, if indeed the water condition is due to the residual copper ore, does this make the property undesirable? (like if it is toxic or something)
Copper is very toxic to invertebrates, only mildly to animals. You should not eat fish out of the lake regardless as the organic forms of metals will bioaccumulate, UNTIL YOU GET IT TESTED.

There is no way to judge water quality by simply looking at it. Anyone who tells you otherwise is lying to you.
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Old 03-21-2018, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Mendocino, CA
858 posts, read 611,359 times
Reputation: 568
Turns out this is one of the gold mines prospected about 100 years ago. There are shafts at the bottom of the lake as long as 700'.

What do you make of this?
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Old 03-22-2018, 02:46 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
8,650 posts, read 7,407,133 times
Reputation: 17867
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhbj03 View Post
Turns out this is one of the gold mines prospected about 100 years ago. There are shafts at the bottom of the lake as long as 700'.

What do you make of this?

I think that's really bad news if you had plans for that water. Might even be bad for the surface soil on that property in general, not just the water. Many properties that have old open pit mines or tailings ponds on them or deep mine shafts under them will sell for a song and a wink because the properties are contaminated. I'm thinking if you have the pond water and the soil tested you may find you'd be getting the worst side of a bad bargain if you buy that property.

In gold and copper mines 100 years ago cyanide was (and still is) being used as a leach reagent and mercury was being used as part of the gold refining process. Miners did this right on site at the mines and the left over contaminated tailings were left in long narrow piles to the sides or dumped back down into the played out mine shafts along with the contaminated water that was used in the separating and refining procedures. These and other toxic chemicals are still being used in many mining projects around the world and the environmentally hazardous toxins are still being recovered from tailings left behind in old played out mines, as well as from the sites of old tailings ponds that have long since dried up.

Whatever is making the pond water milky green like that may or may not be related, (and I still don't believe there are any fish living in it) but if the property is the site of an old gold mine from a 100 years ago when there were absolutely no environmental protection laws in place then there's a good chance the entire property is contaminated and that puts the sale in a different light.

Do your due diligence and find out everything you can about the property before you commit yourself. Don't get taken for a sucker because you don't know enough.

.
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Old 03-25-2018, 10:39 PM
 
Location: on the wind
9,585 posts, read 4,254,434 times
Reputation: 32266
OP, read your other thread about your burglarized house on the House forum. The one that would require coastal zone permit/surveys before fencing?

//www.city-data.com/forum/house...ild-fence.html

You've determined to buy another rural CA property that you won't be living in? One that might well come with water quality problems due to the old mine? There may well be environmental burdens on this place too, so be prepared. You must be a glutton for punishment!

Last edited by Parnassia; 03-25-2018 at 11:09 PM..
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Old 03-26-2018, 03:56 AM
 
Location: Mendocino, CA
858 posts, read 611,359 times
Reputation: 568
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllisonHB View Post
OP, read your other thread about your burglarized house on the House forum. The one that would require coastal zone permit/surveys before fencing?

//www.city-data.com/forum/house...ild-fence.html

You've determined to buy another rural CA property that you won't be living in? One that might well come with water quality problems due to the old mine? There may well be environmental burdens on this place too, so be prepared. You must be a glutton for punishment!
Haha thank you for the heads up. I am having the water tested before bidding. I am running the risk of it being grabbed by others, but I think this is the prudent approach... Can't deal with a major headache right now.

You have to agree, it's a stunning property.....

Last edited by rhbj03; 03-26-2018 at 04:17 AM..
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Old 05-11-2018, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Mendocino, CA
858 posts, read 611,359 times
Reputation: 568
Hi, this question about the lake property I'm looking at may not be most suited for Nature forum, but I see there are a lot of people with diverse expertise here, so I give it a try.

This lake property I'm looking at has sat on the market for one year. I don't quite understand why no one has snatched it up, and keep thinking what could be the potential issue with the property that scare people off. One possibility is the liability of people including trespassers falling into the lake. This legal question is more common and I'm somewhat comfortable with it.

My real question is, if I were the owner, what if there is some earth shift and the lake bursts, water goes down hill and damage other properties, will I be liable for that? When walking on property, the soil felt damp so I think that might be a very slight possibility even without earthquake. Along the same line, could someone come to me and demand that I do something now to prevent such occurrence?

Is there any way to find out whether there is any pending litigation or even just complaint about the property?
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