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Old 05-09-2018, 10:20 AM
 
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How California’s Giant Sequoias Tell the Story of Americans’ Conflicted Relationship With Nature
In the mid-19th century, “Big Tree mania” spread across the country and our love for the trees has never abated

Smithsonian
By Zach St. George

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/scien...ure-180968389/
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Old 05-18-2018, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Near Falls Lake
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Pictures never do those trees justice!
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Old 05-25-2018, 01:21 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
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Global Warming dangerous for the Sequoia? The great drought 800 yrs ago in the SW was bad enough to kill off the Anasazi but it didn't bother the Sequoia. They survived the Roman Warm Period, the cold of the Dark Ages, the Medieval Warm Period, the Little Ice Age and now the recent cycle of warming as our climate returns to normal. If they were all that sensitive to changing weather, they'd never have made it this far.


The Sequoia need periodic fires not only to clear ground for their seedlings, but the high heat of fires is needed to get the seeds to pop out of the cones to germinate.



It's not nice to mess with Mother Nature.


BTW- speaking of big trees-- when the NE loggers got to WI 175 yrs ago to supply growing Milwaukee & Chicago with lumber, they were felling White Pine with trunks up to 20 feet in diameter. Today there are few pines with trunks more than 3 ft.
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