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Old 05-17-2018, 02:49 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
17,831 posts, read 11,338,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RainMusic View Post
Why not? It's not like they are endangered species.
just because you can doesn't mean you should.


They have a function in nature. Let them do it.
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Old 05-17-2018, 04:07 AM
 
Location: Here and now.
11,908 posts, read 4,179,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PAhippo View Post
just because you can doesn't mean you should.


They have a function in nature. Let them do it.
I guess it depends on the situation. I would not harm any animal I noticed minding its own business while I was out walking in the woods, but if I found a deadly snake in my yard, yes, I would kill it. We have dogs who use that space, and I'm not terribly interested in losing one to a snake bite.
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Old 05-17-2018, 06:33 AM
 
56,351 posts, read 44,730,517 times
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Hey guys, just a little warning for you....there are "melanistic aberattions" in coral snakes where they lack certain band colors and then are mistaken for milk snakes etc.

I'd just be super super careful unless it's like super big and thus couldn't be a coral or you REALLY know your identification.

P.S. Misidentification of a snake by someone else who then handed the snake in a bag...who then reached in and got bit.....is what killed herpetologist Joe Slowinski of Kansas State University about 10 years or so ago.
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 7,275,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coschristi View Post
I got tangled up with a Water Moccasin when I was a kid. As in; literally tangled up ...

I was swimming in the Pecos River in New Mexico & I got tumbled by the current, onto my back with my legs up in the air & as my legs rose up out of the water while I was drifting with the current; I saw it wrapped around my right leg.

It was sort of surreal but I could swear it was just as surprised as I was. I lowered my leg back down & the current eased it of my leg, uncoiling it over my foot.

So, I got out of the water, obviously.

That's why I am scared of those snakes...they can appear in an instant in lakes and rivers....glad you were ok.
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:48 AM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,564 posts, read 48,827,425 times
Reputation: 13442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
Hey guys, just a little warning for you....there are "melanistic aberattions" in coral snakes where they lack certain band colors and then are mistaken for milk snakes etc.

I'd just be super super careful unless it's like super big and thus couldn't be a coral or you REALLY know your identification.

P.S. Misidentification of a snake by someone else who then handed the snake in a bag...who then reached in and got bit.....is what killed herpetologist Joe Slowinski of Kansas State University about 10 years or so ago.
Longer than that. It was 9/11/2001, a day that will live in infamy.
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:52 AM
 
56,351 posts, read 44,730,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
Longer than that. It was 9/11/2001, a day that will live in infamy.
Oh dang...it's been THAT long....wow time flies.

There was a guy that got bit by a mamba at a facility in FLorida that day or the next.
I believe they got an F-16 to fly anti-venom in (I think from black hills reptile institute) to save his life as other air-traffic was grounded.
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Old 05-17-2018, 10:42 AM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
2,268 posts, read 1,025,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Why do you kill them?
Quote:
Originally Posted by RainMusic View Post
Why not? It's not like they are endangered species.
Because...

1) Snakes don't hunt humans. If a snake bites a human, the human has screwed up. One of the ways of increasing the chance of being bit by a snake is to engage it, which one has to do in order to kill it.

2) Snakes play an invaluable role in controlling rodent populations. Rodents spread disease, eat crops, chew wires, and cause far more damage and disruption to dwellings and agriculture and industry than snakes. Even Texas Parks and Wildlife states that snakes should not be killed, for precisely the reasons listed above.

PS - The Texas population of the timber rattlesnake is protected in Texas under both federal law and Texas state law.
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Old 05-17-2018, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,385 posts, read 5,648,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
Leave snakes alone!!!!!!
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Old 05-17-2018, 11:03 AM
 
641 posts, read 860,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
Because...

1) Snakes don't hunt humans. If a snake bites a human, the human has screwed up. One of the ways of increasing the chance of being bit by a snake is to engage it, which one has to do in order to kill it.

2) Snakes play an invaluable role in controlling rodent populations. Rodents spread disease, eat crops, chew wires, and cause far more damage and disruption to dwellings and agriculture and industry than snakes. Even Texas Parks and Wildlife states that snakes should not be killed, for precisely the reasons listed above.

PS - The Texas population of the timber rattlesnake is protected in Texas under both federal law and Texas state law.
That snakes only bite humans when the human has screwed up is wrong. If a human unknowingly gets too close to a nervous venomous snake, the human will be bit. And there are times when the humans need to conduct their human business, and the dangerous snakes have to go from that area.

I don't like to see anything slaughtered either, especially with no point.
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Old 05-17-2018, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Lone Mountain Las Vegas NV
15,778 posts, read 6,315,031 times
Reputation: 7348
From the boy scouts 65 years ago -
Red and yellow kill a fellow - Red and black friend of jack.

Use to catch copper heads when a kid. Never bitten.

I would kill venomous snakes anywhere near residents or nearby property. Outside of that I would suggest leaving them alone.

Once had a run in with a water moccasin that ended up with a dead snake. That snake was clearly aggressive and a bite was avoided only because of a good boot. Snakes do not always back off.
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