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Old 05-22-2018, 10:30 AM
 
1,452 posts, read 1,049,414 times
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I was a Rutger's Master Gardener for 4 years. Learned a lot. Soil is primary. My advice which I have been following/spreading for years - Seek out what is indigenous to your area. Learn how to make it grow. Not always easy - I collect Ilex Opaca berries every winter.

Wildlife will focus on indigenous for food and habit.
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Old 05-22-2018, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Southern MN
7,612 posts, read 4,350,959 times
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Soil is primary. Here in Southern MN we share some of the world's richest loam with our longitudinal sister, the Ukraine.

For decades now I've been watching Greater Area Growth clear and haul away prime farm land to build ticky-tacky, overpriced housing which will be in ruins within thirty years. Why is that called "growth?"

I imagine it took millennia to form that black soil. Where does it go? A landfill, I hope. Or are we selling it to other countries?

Along with the soil I wonder where did the birds go? The frogs, the butterflies, the bees?

I live in a valley which was once bejeweled with sumac shining gold, orange and burgundy in the fall. A recent drive through some of my favorite haunts shows them gutted, sprayed and chain-sawed. Dirt and stubble lines the charming woodsy hillsides. I sure hope they planted some wildflower seed in it's place.

I have a strong belief that natural beauty lifts the spirit and teaches us gratitude for the small and ephemeral in our lives. Glass, concrete and asphalt have their place but can never nurture a human spirit the way the sights and sounds of our given evolving environment can.

Toldja I was feeling grumpy about this.
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Old 05-22-2018, 10:00 PM
 
2,180 posts, read 917,588 times
Reputation: 3604
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
I've got one but it's grumpy. My beautiful, abandoned gravelpit, natural spring-fed swimming pond.

I've been swimming there for over forty years. The city has taken it over and made a park. As far as I'm concerned they have ruined the natural beauty with their rip-rap to prevent erosion, their asphalt walking paths and, yes, even building the nice dock for fishing (that they won't let any kids jump off of.)

The pond was ringed with chokecherry bushes - huge, gorgeous and bountiful ones that no one even knew what they were anymore. One day I arrived, sickened to see bulldozers killing the chokecherries to make the parking lot larger. I'm betting no one involved in the decision-making process had a clue that they were an endangered resource.

The clash between our constant need for "upgraded" recreational space and natural beauty continues and Joni Mitchell can't help but echo in my head.
How long ago were the chokeberries taken out? You might contact the local media and while the city won't do anything about it most likely...at least it may get them thinking and more careful in their next endeavors.
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Old 05-22-2018, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Southern MN
7,612 posts, read 4,350,959 times
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Thanks, petsandgardens. It was last summer. If I'd had my phone with me I'd have called right away I was so panicked. You'd think the house was on fire!

Since then I've been thinking about a letter to read at City Council asking them to check on the "shrubberies" before hacking away. Your post gives me encouragement to do so.

We did get, instead, a couple of rain gardens. They've been all the rage around here, the latest environmental craze. DH calls them sinkholes full of weeds. LOL. Basically they are what we already had only more citified and chic. Gotta justify the pay of those fresh out of college urban planners.

Come on over some time and I'll take you on a tour of our roundabouts and rain gardens. We're cool folks here.

Still grumpy but need to make a disclaimer. If anyone's grandkids just landed a city planner job I still think you should be proud of 'em.
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Old 06-02-2018, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Florida
12,979 posts, read 6,217,668 times
Reputation: 26415
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
I've got one but it's grumpy. My beautiful, abandoned gravelpit, natural spring-fed swimming pond.

I've been swimming there for over forty years. The city has taken it over and made a park. As far as I'm concerned they have ruined the natural beauty with their rip-rap to prevent erosion, their asphalt walking paths and, yes, even building the nice dock for fishing (that they won't let any kids jump off of.)

The pond was ringed with chokecherry bushes - huge, gorgeous and bountiful ones that no one even knew what they were anymore. One day I arrived, sickened to see bulldozers killing the chokecherries to make the parking lot larger. I'm betting no one involved in the decision-making process had a clue that they were an endangered resource.

The clash between our constant need for "upgraded" recreational space and natural beauty continues and Joni Mitchell can't help but echo in my head.

That song popped into my head at your first paragraph.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWwUJH70ubM
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Old 06-02-2018, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 7,420,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luciano700 View Post
Me thinking


Go to the ask the forum and find my request on horticulture...please add in your support!
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Old 06-02-2018, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 7,420,615 times
Reputation: 30347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
As already noted, the Gardening forum soaks up much of this conversation. The other issue is that frankly more people notice and appreciate wild animals than wild plants. (Which is unfortunate, because plants are every bit as fascinating!)

Feel free to start some plant-centric threads here! They would be on-topic and welcome.
6


Under ask the forum we have asked for a horticulture thread...add your support!!
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Old 06-03-2018, 09:23 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
24,958 posts, read 32,773,546 times
Reputation: 51008
Landscape, plants, nature..... I've always planted things that provide food and cover for the quail. Does that count?
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Old 06-07-2018, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,343 posts, read 1,175,840 times
Reputation: 4191
Yes Oregon, what ever you plant is a "garden". Spreading wildflower seeds in a field is a form of gardening. When choosing shrubs and trees for my yard I usually ask myself if it will provide flowers for bees/bugs/butterflies or berries for birds. I do choose some just because I like it too.

I've been thinking about taking out a viburnum that has been a problem dealing with for years. It's planted close to the house and sends up way too many suckers. I haven't kept up with the sucker the past few years and is crazy overgrown. The "main" Bush in the middle of all the suckers now flourishing looks dead. But after inspecting it yesterday I noticed all the insects enjoying the flowers. It's a whole eco system in itself. Even large dragon flies patrolling to get some bugs. Plus it does get berries...... Now I don't want to remove it. But it's going to be a lot of work getting it under control.
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Old 06-07-2018, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,343 posts, read 1,175,840 times
Reputation: 4191
Yes Oregon, what ever you plant is a "garden". Spreading wildflower seeds in a field is a form of gardening. When choosing shrubs and trees for my yard I usually ask myself if it will provide flowers for bees/bugs/butterflies or berries for birds. I do choose some just because I like it too.

I've been thinking about taking out a viburnum that has been a problem dealing with for years. It's planted close to the house and sends up way too many suckers. I haven't kept up with the sucker the past few years and is crazy overgrown. The "main" Bush in the middle of all the suckers now flourishing looks dead. But after inspecting it yesterday I noticed all the insects enjoying the flowers. It's a whole eco system in itself. Even large dragon flies patrolling to get some bugs. Plus it does get berries...... Now I don't want to remove it. But it's going to be a lot of work getting it under control.
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