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Old 09-19-2018, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,218 posts, read 1,006,389 times
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I've discovered two very late flowering plants that have attracted loads of our late season Monarch's here in Minnesota. Where I live, Minneapolis area, was known for being a major Monarch route. I remember people commenting on the large amount there used to be in the 60's and 70's at least. But not so true lately.

Sedums flowers really late they are flowering now attracts all kinds of butterflies, including monarchs. I observed a plant about 4 weeks ago, actually about 7-8 tall spindley with spikes of small purple flowers, there were at least 9 at a time feeding on them. They are on my list for next spring.

The one I saw was just like this one. Bright pink flowers.
https://www.almanac.com/plant/sedum

There are many different kinds of liatris, this is the one I saw. Needs to be staked because flowers were flopped over. Not the prettiest of the liatris. They are probably more of the "heirloom" plant and has more attributes that attracts butterflies rather than the ones that have been selectively grown for better looks.
https://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/3294...hoC2AYQAvD_BwE

Last edited by Izzie1213; 09-19-2018 at 08:59 PM..
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Old 09-20-2018, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Florida
11,808 posts, read 5,512,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerraDown View Post
Like the monarchs, the milkweed bugs gravitate to 'Pleurisy plant' (a common name for milkweed/asclepias)
because of the white sap, which after ingested by the two insects, gives them protection from predators.

Any soil will do, a good potting soil is fine. They make deep roots, so buy a planter pot that is taller more than wide. As soon as you see roots peeking out the bottom of said planter, plant in the ground, if you are able.

*There are now considered two 'species' of monarchs. The original which makes her wonderful migratory journey from Canada back into Mexico...and the sub species, which inhabits S Fla. The pennisula is so long, that many Scientists believe they actually do not migrate at all, but live here year round.

If you do this right Ms. Chili, you will also draw in Queen butterflies, Cuban butterflies, and many other lovely winged jewels. Don't forget our native Gulf fritillaries.

Saw the first one of these just a week ago!
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Old 09-20-2018, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Florida
11,808 posts, read 5,512,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Izzie1213 View Post
I've discovered two very late flowering plants that have attracted loads of our late season Monarch's here in Minnesota. Where I live, Minneapolis area, was known for being a major Monarch route. I remember people commenting on the large amount there used to be in the 60's and 70's at least. But not so true lately.

Sedums flowers really late they are flowering now attracts all kinds of butterflies, including monarchs. I observed a plant about 4 weeks ago, actually about 7-8 tall spindley with spikes of small purple flowers, there were at least 9 at a time feeding on them. They are on my list for next spring.

The one I saw was just like this one. Bright pink flowers.
https://www.almanac.com/plant/sedum

There are many different kinds of liatris, this is the one I saw. Needs to be staked because flowers were flopped over. Not the prettiest of the liatris. They are probably more of the "heirloom" plant and has more attributes that attracts butterflies rather than the ones that have been selectively grown for better looks.
https://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/3294...hoC2AYQAvD_BwE

Are the Monarchs actually laying eggs on the Sedum or just eating the sap? No sure they will grow in the high temps of SW Florida. I will have to google that.
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Old 09-20-2018, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Florida
11,808 posts, read 5,512,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
That may be that you just "caught" it having emerged from the chrysalis, initially the body is full of blood and fluids that will be pumped into the wings to fully "deploy" them.



Hope I am right about this. Tell me this guy "straightened himself out".


Here in south-central Washington, I do have quite a bit of milkweed on the 13 acre place, I have not noticed any caterpillars this year, have not noticed but maybe a few Monarchs. Maybe we are not on a major migration path.

No unfortunately. Even its chrysalis didn't look normal.
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Old 09-20-2018, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Florida
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Originally Posted by mawipafl View Post
I saw that this thread seemed to begin with Generation One questions, comments, suggestions. Here in northeast Florida in mid-September I am in the midst of Generation Four. Outside, 18 successfully fluttered away, 1 emerged deformed, 7 died in their chrysalides (OE?, parasitic tachynids and/or wasps? Don't know for sure.) Inside in the nursery, 1 cat parasitized by tachynid, 3 died in chrysalides, but 16 successful releases with 1 who just emerged 5 minutes ago, another that is ready to emerge, and 7 more chrysalides that should give forth butterflies by this weekend. I also have two stragglers, an instar5 cat and an instar1 cat that hatched last night.

As for running out of milkweed, boy did I ever considering the 50+ hungry caterpillars all eating at the same time. No nursery near me, not even two native plant nurseries, have anything besides the tropical. Over the course of one week I bought 22 new plants since all of my 40+- in-ground milkweeds were bare sticks. I didn't even bother to plant the new ones. At the rate I calculated, 4 caterpillars were consuming an entire plant in 1 day. In a pinch, tropical just had to do, but my local nursery is 90% certain that their grower does not use pesticides. I have to believe it's true because my first plants in 2016 from Lowe's were probably full of pesticides and growth enhancers, at least I consider that a factor toward a low survival rate that year.

My go-to for supplies (other than milkweed) is monarchbutterflyshop.net. Signed up for emails which are always full of great info and links.

Note: purposely I do not use all the proper words like pupating and eclosing .. I use egg hatching, j-hanging, forming chrysalides (my choice of word for more than one chrysalis...at least I don't use the word cocoon), emerging when butterflies crack open their chrysalis shell and pop out, the Monarch Dance as a butterfly starts pumping up its wings and forming its straw (proboscis). The fastest way to put someone to sleep, whom you hope to excite and to get involved, is to blabber with too many scientific words :-)

So, posters, any update from your neck of the woods?


Very little activity here. The milkweed in the front island has all grown back but I haven't seen any caterpillars on them. I saw one in the backyard on one of the milkweed that is not doing well and moved it to a healthier looking plant. I need to take some of these plants that are still in pots and plant them but I'm waiting for a little cooler weather. Plants some seeds like someone suggested but nothing ever happened.
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Old 09-20-2018, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Amelia View
4,251 posts, read 12,842,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Izzie1213 View Post
I've discovered two very late flowering plants that have attracted loads of our late season Monarch's here in Minnesota. Where I live, Minneapolis area, was known for being a major Monarch route. I remember people commenting on the large amount there used to be in the 60's and 70's at least. But not so true lately.

Sedums flowers really late they are flowering now attracts all kinds of butterflies, including monarchs. I observed a plant about 4 weeks ago, actually about 7-8 tall spindley with spikes of small purple flowers, there were at least 9 at a time feeding on them. They are on my list for next spring.

The one I saw was just like this one. Bright pink flowers.
https://www.almanac.com/plant/sedum

There are many different kinds of liatris, this is the one I saw. Needs to be staked because flowers were flopped over. Not the prettiest of the liatris. They are probably more of the "heirloom" plant and has more attributes that attracts butterflies rather than the ones that have been selectively grown for better looks.
https://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/3294...hoC2AYQAvD_BwE
I have had such lousy luck trying to grow any kind of sedum and liatris 'blazing star' ... however the sedum you described is different, probably because it's a northern version, however I am going to try it anyway. Same with the liatris...the ones here have large flowers, so maybe the 'heirloom' type might work better. The orientation of my house and its gardens is a challenge. The front faces west, so most plants have shade in the morning and bake in the afternoon except some that get shade then filtered light - no direct sunlight because of a big tree. One of my side gardens is shaded until midday, then gets some sun, but in late afternoon the front of that garden bakes. There aren't a lot of flowering plants that can tolerate extremes. Happily one plant that loves to bake all day long is plumbago, a bush full of light blue flowers that bees and butterflies love. Every year I plant more out front ... glad I like the color blue!
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Old 09-20-2018, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Amelia View
4,251 posts, read 12,842,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
Saw the first one of these just a week ago!
I have to be more observant! I have seen Queens, but now I wonder if some might be Gulf. At a distance they might seem somewhat similar.
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Old 09-20-2018, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Amelia View
4,251 posts, read 12,842,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
Very little activity here. The milkweed in the front island has all grown back but I haven't seen any caterpillars on them. I saw one in the backyard on one of the milkweed that is not doing well and moved it to a healthier looking plant. I need to take some of these plants that are still in pots and plant them but I'm waiting for a little cooler weather. Plants some seeds like someone suggested but nothing ever happened.
It had been 'quiet' here in northeast FL, too, until yesterday, or so I thought. There had been quite a few butterflies enjoying pentas, but then moving on to other gardens. However, yesterday afternoon the female monarchs were busy busy busy depositing eggs on whatever small milkweed leaves they could find. I decided to collect some and also found many instar1 cats, so obviously the females had been busy some days ago. I asked my local nursery to set aside all the milkweed they have left because I know my plants will not have leafed out enough once the cats are bigger. The lull is now over, so perhaps you'll also get some action shortly, too.
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,218 posts, read 1,006,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
Are the Monarchs actually laying eggs on the Sedum or just eating the sap? No sure they will grow in the high temps of SW Florida. I will have to google that.

The butterflies were going after the flower nectar of the sedum. It's the only thing that had any flowers that I could see. I think they only lay eggs on milkweed I'm pretty sure because that's what the caterpillars need to eat.
Now I'm confused, I will have to look up..do the butterflies lay the eggs or the caterpillar? Can a monarch crystalis over winter in Minnesota? I doubt their eggs can, for sure not a butterfly. We're the monarchs I saw late emergers and won't make it?

I do know for sure the caterpillar will do there crysalis on plants other than milkweed, I saw this first hand one summer on a bush at my house and a milkweed plant was across the yard from.

I was actually surprised to see monarchs this time of the year. I was in central Minnesota over the weekend when I saw then. Extreme northern Minnesota had a frost advisory over the weekend. Aren't they cutting it awfully close to when they need to get to warmer climate?

----Update----
The butterflies lay the eggs.
Found this site with loads of Monarch research.

https://monarchlab.org/biology-and-r...al-life-cycle/

Last edited by Izzie1213; 09-20-2018 at 08:41 AM..
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:29 AM
 
10,791 posts, read 8,829,540 times
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Very mature ivy grows on one of my old trees here in central Kentucky. After many years, the typical shape of the leaves change to a more oval shape, and ivy becomes woody - and blooms in late summer/early fall, with a non-showy, light green bloom. Not great for the tree - but bees and butterflies, including monarchs, love it.

Butterflies also appreciate the minerals in the limestone along our local waterways, so perhaps collecting rock slabs and keeping them moist would help attract butterflies, if you are in or visit a limestone area.
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