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Old 09-20-2018, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Amelia View
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Izzie1213 View Post
The butterflies were going after the flower nectar of the sedum. It's the only thing that had any flowers that I could see. I think they only lay eggs on milkweed I'm pretty sure because that's what the caterpillars need to eat.
Now I'm confused, I will have to look up..do the butterflies lay the eggs or the caterpillar? Can a monarch crystalis over winter in Minnesota? I doubt their eggs can, for sure not a butterfly. We're the monarchs I saw late emergers and won't make it?

I do know for sure the caterpillar will do there crysalis on plants other than milkweed, I saw this first hand one summer on a bush at my house and a milkweed plant was across the yard from.

I was actually surprised to see monarchs this time of the year. I was in central Minnesota over the weekend when I saw then. Extreme northern Minnesota had a frost advisory over the weekend. Aren't they cutting it awfully close to when they need to get to warmer climate?
You're right that it is the butterfly who lays the egg and only on milkweed because that's the only food the caterpillars will eat. I will amend that statement - milkweed is the only thing brand new baby cats will eat. Big cats who run out of milkweed have been known to eat parsley, grass, and a few other things.

I don't believe monarch eggs nor chrysalides can over-winter unlike some swallowtail chrysalides that can and do.

And yes, you are right that monarchs will form their chrysalides anywhere! On a variety of plants or on house screens and roof overhangs or hose reels or anywhere they feel safe. Folks in a group I'm in who raise monarchs inside their houses have shared pictures of chrysalides on lampshades and backs of chairs.

The monarch butterflies you saw in central Minnesota might make it. They will probably be part of the migration since I believe MN is in one of the major flyways.
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Amelia View
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Very mature ivy grows on one of my old trees here in central Kentucky. After many years, the typical shape of the leaves change to a more oval shape, and ivy becomes woody - and blooms in late summer/early fall, with a non-showy, light green bloom. Not great for the tree - but bees and butterflies, including monarchs, love it.

Butterflies also appreciate the minerals in the limestone along our local waterways, so perhaps collecting rock slabs and keeping them moist would help attract butterflies, if you are in or visit a limestone area.
Interesting about the ivy!

I didn't think about the minerals in water ... our irrigation system well gets its water from an aquifer that runs through limestone typical of Florida. I am sure the butterflies enjoy the little puddles left behind!
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Old 09-20-2018, 08:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mawipafl View Post
Interesting about the ivy!

I didn't think about the minerals in water ... our irrigation system well gets its water from an aquifer that runs through limestone typical of Florida. I am sure the butterflies enjoy the little puddles left behind!
Eventually, the mature ivy produces small round black "berries", which stick around during most of the winter and provide food for non-migratory songbirds. Not their first choice, but welcome by late January.

And yes, butterflies are known for "puddling", to collect moisture and nutrients.
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
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I've seen all types of butterflies along the shore of a lake where the sand is moist "drinking". I then read something about besides moisture they are also attracted to minerals and salts and misc micronutrients deposited along shores. I saw something about using a tray of sand and keeping sand moist for butterflies. Also read something about they like clay in sand because clay contains alot of minerals. I tried it once many years ago, added some overrip bananas too.
Found a link
https://premeditatedleftovers.com/ga...erfly-puddler/
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Old 09-20-2018, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mawipafl View Post
You're right that it is the butterfly who lays the egg and only on milkweed because that's the only food the caterpillars will eat. I will amend that statement - milkweed is the only thing brand new baby cats will eat. Big cats who run out of milkweed have been known to eat parsley, grass, and a few other things.

The monarch butterflies you saw in central Minnesota might make it. They will probably be part of the migration since I believe MN is in one of the major flyways.

Maybe it was the parsley they were attracted to. For a few years I randomly planted about 3 clumps of regular parsley in my landscaping. They are kind of attractive little green " bushes" and edible! I don't have a veggie garden anymore but plant a few tomato and other mics veggies, pole beans, green peppers etc.

You are right about Minnesota being a major flight area for monarchs. Many years ago a friend lived in the area I live now and I remember her saying monarchs would almost cover some trees in her yard, this was in the 70's. I see very few here now, at least in comparison to then.
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Old 09-20-2018, 05:33 PM
 
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Saw several monarchs around town today! So hope they are recovering their numbers...
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Old 09-21-2018, 02:53 PM
 
458 posts, read 616,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deserterer View Post
Look what Facebook is doing to your brain



https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/ca...ually-pumpkin/

I'm not on Facebook. I read it elsewhere.

Very relieved to find out it's not true.

I don't know why you felt you needed to be offensive.
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Old 09-23-2018, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Florida
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They're baaaaaacccck! Have about 15 caterpillars, mostly large and a few smaller ones.
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Old 09-23-2018, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
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I've been seeing A LOT of monarchs flying around lately here in Kansas City. They're flying everywhere - over freeways and busy roads, through shopping centers, through my backyard ... you name it. Yesterday I was watching one flying through traffic while I was waiting at a light at a freeway off-ramp when it occurred to me that they're all flying generally southward. This being late September, I realized they must be migrating. I then saw more today and started wondering where some of the ones I'm seeing might have originated from? Minnesota? Even Canada? It made me feel for the guys trying to fly over the freeways: It seems that most of them make it, but I know I've hit at least one of them trying to cross the freeway last weekend. Such fragile little creatures making such a long and perilous journey!
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Old 09-24-2018, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Florida
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There was an interesting PBS Nature documentary about the Monarch and the Painted Lady's perilous journey recently. It's amazing how these fragile looking butterflies can migrate thousands of miles.
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