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Old 01-14-2020, 08:22 PM
Status: "Subtropical climates don't necessarily have 12 warm months." (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
675 posts, read 151,648 times
Reputation: 438

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
If you can, take a look at the USGS - UG Geological Survey - map or maps of your property. They usually show caves and always show elevation, waterways, and other natural features.
Thanks! I've taken a look. It shows Mfp bedrock type above ~900ft elevation (my house and most ridgetops), Olcy at 900-640ft (most valleys and hillsides, including the hillside my grandmother's sinkhole is on) and Obc below ~640ft (which is completely absent on our 170 acres but is where my grandmother's cave is). I don't have any idea what those abbreviations stand for, but I thought I knew it was layered between sandstone for the Highland Rim elevations, limestone for Nashville Basin elevations and shale in between?

However, the transition from Part 2 to Part 3 seems to coincide perfectly with that 900ft mark (although oddly, there's shale slightly above 900ft at that exact spot, even though it's sandstone by the time I reach 920ft). Above that 900ft mark, the rock (shale or sandstone) is exposed so long as there's running water, but the supposed solid shale isn't exposed in the 900-880ft mark where the gradual sink-in occurs. I wonder whether maybe the solid rock somehow curves differently than the surface terrain and that's why the stream disappears oddly (not even seeping into the pond consistently) and re-emerges later than you'd expect?

It also oddly shows the stream (not the Parts 1-5 that are too insignificant for them to bother adding at all) to be perennial rather than intermittent, even though I know that NOT to be the case (at least besides Parts 2 and 4) after seeing it dry up in the majority (but not all for Part 7) of Augusts, Septembers and Octobers. This "water year," it even took until extremely late in December for Part 7 to resurface (although we did have a severe drought).

I've not seen it showing caves.
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Old Yesterday, 10:58 PM
Status: "Subtropical climates don't necessarily have 12 warm months." (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
675 posts, read 151,648 times
Reputation: 438
Well, it's still not continuous, but today I went down there and noticed massive changes. We got a flood last week while we were gone to Charleston (which I'd seen evidence of earlier), and it apparently washed out a lot more stuff in Parts 5, 7 and especially 3. Also, I saw the transition from Part 6 to 7 washed out in an even fashion where the water at the beginning of 7 runs out of the ground, and it seems that "spring" is indeed just the creek running out of the ground.

I wonder whether Part 7 re-emerging may actually already be interlinked with 3 but just underground.
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