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View Poll Results: Which one do you think?
Small mountains 2 28.57%
Big hills 5 71.43%
Voters: 7. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-19-2019, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
517 posts, read 111,666 times
Reputation: 338

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
Probably because the highest elevation east of the Mississippi River is only 6684 feet. That's pretty lame.
But it's impressive enough to create a hemiboreal climate in a normally subtropical region, create an entire medium-sized rainforest and attract visitors from around the world. I do agree that it's lame compared to something like Colorado or California, though.
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Old 12-19-2019, 10:24 PM
 
Location: West Coast U.S.A.
523 posts, read 235,972 times
Reputation: 983
In the Pacific Northwest those would only qualify as medium small hills. They would have to be quite a bit bigger before they could be called mountains. Then again, what people in the Pacific Northwest would call a lake would be considered a pond by Midwesterners. I guess it's just a matter of what one is used to.
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Old 12-19-2019, 11:38 PM
 
7,395 posts, read 4,069,949 times
Reputation: 19689
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post
But it's impressive enough to create a hemiboreal climate in a normally subtropical region, create an entire medium-sized rainforest and attract visitors from around the world. I do agree that it's lame compared to something like Colorado or California, though.
Between military service, growing up, and work, I've lived in and around the Appalachians, the Rockies, the Sierra's and the Coast Range. It's not about which is higher than the other, but about seeing and understanding what's there, from the basic landforms to the climate to the biodiversity to the cultures, each is unique. None better than the other, but each unique to itself. The interesting thing about the Appalachians, esp southern Appalachians, is they are a very jumbled mess of dirt so to speak running back and forth across one another to create a lot of narrow and hidden valleys, compared to the western mountains that form more parallel rows. These differences create very different climates and vistas when looking out on them.

They are all mountains. Comparing one to the other is like comparing steak and lobster. They are very different, but both good and they pair well together.
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Old 12-20-2019, 12:10 AM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
517 posts, read 111,666 times
Reputation: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Between military service, growing up, and work, I've lived in and around the Appalachians, the Rockies, the Sierra's and the Coast Range. It's not about which is higher than the other, but about seeing and understanding what's there, from the basic landforms to the climate to the biodiversity to the cultures, each is unique. None better than the other, but each unique to itself. The interesting thing about the Appalachians, esp southern Appalachians, is they are a very jumbled mess of dirt so to speak running back and forth across one another to create a lot of narrow and hidden valleys, compared to the western mountains that form more parallel rows. These differences create very different climates and vistas when looking out on them.

They are all mountains. Comparing one to the other is like comparing steak and lobster. They are very different, but both good and they pair well together.
I agree. But the Highland Rim isn't any of those; they're a lower plateau adjacent to the Cumberland Plateau (subtropical, never-glaciated part of the Appalachian Plateau, as opposed to the temperate, recently-glaciated Allegheny).

EDIT: This has gone off-topic lol. I thought I thoroughly explained what the Highland Rim is.
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