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Old 12-23-2019, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
505 posts, read 109,463 times
Reputation: 333

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Tundra arguments:
--Warmest month has a mean below 50F/10C.
--Danger of freezes and snow in all months.
--Austral tundras usually have some climatic influence from Antarctica despite the Southern Ocean's and Circumpolar Current's blockade.
--Many austral islands with similar climates lack trees, in some cases even ones with milder winters.
--Not all tundras have permafrost or even subfreezing winters. Just look at most subantarctic tundras, many alpine tundras, most Faroe tundras and many Icelandic tundras!

Tundra counter-arguments:
--Nearby Ushuaia, which also has a sub-50F/10C warmest month, is still heavily forested.
--Danger of freezes and snow in all months happens in almost all subpolar climates (oceanic or not). Even a few marginal hemiboreal climates (NC's Mount Mitchell as an example) have this same feat.
--Even Fraser, CO can and does freeze year-round despite VERY warm, sometimes hot, summer days.
--The blockade still greatly weakens the Antarctic influence. That's why Dxc climates are far less common, Dxb climates extremely rare and Dxa climates fully absent in the south temperate zone.
--It's possible that those austral islands lack trees simply because the Southern Ocean acts as a seed block. Besides, the Gulf of Mexico and Desert Southwest act as a seed block to subtropical plants reentering places like TN, VA, AR and OK, and some tundras near New Zealand have evolved mega-herbs normally more akin to tropical alpine tundras.
--Additionally, the Southern Ocean and its surrounded landmasses are fiercely windswept with little relief; flag-trees often occur in southern Patagonia even above the 50F/10C isotherm, and the Moorlands still have some trees in more wind-sheltered areas.

Which one do you think? Why?
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Old 12-25-2019, 08:07 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
3,197 posts, read 1,251,584 times
Reputation: 7105
"Tundra" seems to be defined by the vegetation, which in turn has to do with temps, precip. & soil conditions. By definition, there are no trees on a tundra.


https://scioly.org/wiki/index.php/Ecology/Tundra
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Old 12-26-2019, 01:29 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
8,200 posts, read 7,126,500 times
Reputation: 16775
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post


Magellanic Moorland: tundra or heathland?

Which one do you think? Why?

It's a heathland. You are forgetting something very important, you are not looking at the whole ecology. You are focusing on flora and their growing conditions and temperatures but you are ignoring fauna - and fauna is just as important as flora is at making any environment what it is and giving it a classification.

Regardless of whatever the flora growing conditions might be at various locations you mentioned, it's still a heathland because it has and supports far more fauna than any tundra anywhere would have and be able to support.

.
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Old 12-26-2019, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
505 posts, read 109,463 times
Reputation: 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
By definition, there are no trees on a tundra.
Then it's a heathland. To quote one of my tundra counter-arguments:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post
--Additionally, the Southern Ocean and its surrounded landmasses are fiercely windswept with little relief; flag-trees often occur in southern Patagonia even above the 50F/10C isotherm, and the Moorlands still have some trees in more wind-sheltered areas.
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