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View Poll Results: World's Most Favorite/Favourite Animal?
Dolphin 4 6.56%
Birds 4 6.56%
Pony 0 0%
Rabbit 1 1.64%
Spider 0 0%
Wolf 3 4.92%
Lion 1 1.64%
Tiger 2 3.28%
White Tiger 0 0%
Liger 0 0%
Tigon 0 0%
Panda 1 1.64%
Snake 0 0%
Shark 0 0%
Bear 1 1.64%
Fish 0 0%
Horse 2 3.28%
Cat 10 16.39%
Dog 32 52.46%
Cow/Bull 0 0%
Voters: 61. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-30-2019, 12:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
Interesting. Not familiar with this particular breed. I would have pinned it for an Arab line of some sort.

I can see why.

(They are the "easterners" like the Arabian horses and are very ancient breed too.)


"It remains a disputed "chicken or egg" question whether the influential Arabian was the ancestor of the Turkoman or was developed out of that breed, but current DNA evidence points to a possible common ancestor for both."



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvOMcw2xJMc


(Oh, here is Putin by the way, gifting such horse to some... king of Bahrain?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6J0YWz9zcmo


Quote:
But certainly not a cattle working horse. LOL...an average size steer would pull the critter right over on the dally.

Might show it some disrespect on turn back duty. Unless your working Aussie with a whip. You say they're agile so might make a good penning and reining mount with a light rider. Be a good mount for my lady. She only goes a shade over 90 pounds with her boots on at 5'1.
Lol no, of course not, it's not a "cattle working horse."

Just one look and you'll know that you are dealing basically with a pet, a trustful companion



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9myJWQ_qc0


But they have a lot of stamina and can go miles and miles. And that's what they were originally bred for I'd think.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4K5mV2DPhmg&t=80s


(But I personally didn't care much for them - too delicate, too touchy for my taste.) Although they DO look nice I have to admit. More so, than Arabian horses.

Last edited by erasure; 12-30-2019 at 12:38 AM..
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Old 12-30-2019, 09:29 AM
 
5,897 posts, read 9,607,541 times
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Fun discussion, but the poll title had me confused, too. Favorite iconic wild animal? Favorite pet? Favorite working partner? Or favorite food? Hmmm. And what's the matter with sheep and goats? Did I miss them on the list? I like sheep! And where is the puma/cougar/mountain lion? My favorite wild animal!

The Guardian article is from 2004, based on a survey by Animal Planet. Since then we have learned about dogs and humans being two truly symbiotic species, understanding the instinctive communication styles of each other, and probably having co-evolved socially over 30K years. That may not matter one bit in terms of global animal preferences, but it surely helps us understand our own attachments better.
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Old 12-30-2019, 09:41 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
14,634 posts, read 12,069,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
I can see why.

(They are the "easterners" like the Arabian horses and are very ancient breed too.)


"It remains a disputed "chicken or egg" question whether the influential Arabian was the ancestor of the Turkoman or was developed out of that breed, but current DNA evidence points to a possible common ancestor for both."



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvOMcw2xJMc


(Oh, here is Putin by the way, gifting such horse to some... king of Bahrain?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6J0YWz9zcmo


Lol no, of course not, it's not a "cattle working horse."

Just one look and you'll know that you are dealing basically with a pet, a trustful companion



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9myJWQ_qc0


But they have a lot of stamina and can go miles and miles. And that's what they were originally bred for I'd think.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4K5mV2DPhmg&t=80s


(But I personally didn't care much for them - too delicate, too touchy for my taste.) Although they DO look nice I have to admit. More so, than Arabian horses.
They have that curved proud look like an Andalusian. Similar gait confirmation. Have the moves for sure. Pure Arabs seem choppy to me. That could be because all the Arab breeders and trainers I ever knew actually trained their horses to fight them. They called that "spirit". The result was a critter bordering on insanity and idiocy.

Not the horses fault. Usually never is. My favorite horse I ever had was a. Arab Quarter cross. I used her for cavalry reenactment. She was a war horse. Straight up.

And a sweeter mount I could not ask for. Just a love bug. But when it was time to go to work she was all business. Theres pics of her on my profile. I'd put them up but I'm stuck using my phone right now and I cant get it to do certain functions.

Anyway thanks for the equine history lesson. Quite interesting. That mare I was telling you about. Sheesh I could put small kids on her and turn her loose. She was a great babysitter. Nobody could believe she was half Arab. Like dogs it's not so much the breed it's how they are trained and treated. That mare was worth her weight in platinum.

Any horse that you can trust with kids is. She was a different horse when I got on her though. People would watch her and I work under arms, battlefield, saber course whatever, and then see me turn her over to a youngster and their jaws would drop.

LOL, I was offered big money for her. Nope. Sorry. It would have took a king's ransom for me to turn loose of her.
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Old 12-30-2019, 01:17 PM
 
15,862 posts, read 14,270,720 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
They have that curved proud look like an Andalusian. Similar gait confirmation. Have the moves for sure. Pure Arabs seem choppy to me. That could be because all the Arab breeders and trainers I ever knew actually trained their horses to fight them. They called that "spirit". The result was a critter bordering on insanity and idiocy.

I am not well-familiar with Andalusians and I don't care for Arabs to be honest, ( starting from their looks.)

I don't like that long body and short legs ( not to mention that they are kinda smallish overall.) And not to mention their character)))


Quote:
Not the horses fault. Usually never is. My favorite horse I ever had was a. Arab Quarter cross. I used her for cavalry reenactment. She was a war horse. Straight up.

And a sweeter mount I could not ask for. Just a love bug. But when it was time to go to work she was all business. Theres pics of her on my profile. I'd put them up but I'm stuck using my phone right now and I cant get it to do certain functions.
I think my personal preference was German Trakehner -easy on the eye, friendly and steady. The kind of horse that knew better than me what it was doing, most of the time)))



Quote:
Anyway thanks for the equine history lesson. Quite interesting. That mare I was telling you about. Sheesh I could put small kids on her and turn her loose. She was a great babysitter. Nobody could believe she was half Arab. Like dogs it's not so much the breed it's how they are trained and treated. That mare was worth her weight in platinum.

Any horse that you can trust with kids is. She was a different horse when I got on her though. People would watch her and I work under arms, battlefield, saber course whatever, and then see me turn her over to a youngster and their jaws would drop.LOL, I was offered big money for her. Nope. Sorry. It would have took a king's ransom for me to turn loose of her.
Well breed matters I think, but sometimes you come across those exceptions that are totally great.
And then of course "no money can buy" them.
As far as the "equine history lessons" - here is yet another video that you might find interesting.
It's the recent horse show in St. Pet including the breeds you might not be familiar with.

( I am not familiar with some of them either, since apparently they made the inroads in Russia from Europe only recently.)

But some - I am well-familiar with.
If you like/interested in some of them, let me know which ones exactly ( timing.)
I'll figure out what they are




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDxtbh8YphQ
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Old 12-30-2019, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
24,493 posts, read 29,524,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
What?

Maybe you misread NVplumber's post and that caused your knee-jerk reaction???

NVplumber never said a single thing about the colour of that horse. He said that horse was a bit too spindly and skinny for his liking and that he preferred a stout quarterhorse. I agree with him, he's right that it looks far too skinny and spindly, rather weak and sickly. A stouter and more muscled horse would look much healthier and stronger - regardless of its colour.

Certainly it's a beautiful champagne colour and its coat is glossy but the poor thing looks positively anorexic, fragile and like it's dying from starvation. Looks like it's so weak if you looked at it the wrong way and blew a puff of air on it then it might topple over and shatter into pieces like broken glass.

I do like that gorgeous champagne colour though.
It may be the physique of that particular breed. Stronger than it looks!

https://www.sunnyskyz.com/blog/2232/...eautiful-Horse


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYsEetvUXTY

https://www.thesprucepets.com/meet-t...l-teke-1886116

"The Akhal-Teke is distinctively fine-boned and flat-muscled. Its body—with its thin barrel and deep chest—is often compared to that of a greyhound or cheetah."

Gorgeous!
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Old 12-30-2019, 04:01 PM
 
15,862 posts, read 14,270,720 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
It may be the physique of that particular breed. Stronger than it looks!


"The Akhal-Teke is distinctively fine-boned and flat-muscled. Its body—with its thin barrel and deep chest—is often compared to that of a greyhound or cheetah."

Gorgeous!

You know, it's not even a question of "Ferrari" - I am looking at the last show ( from this year,) and Akhal-Teke is second in a queue.

There are plenty of top "sport cars" here, ( if to use the comparison,) with long necks and all, but Akhal-Teke sure looks different comparably to the rest ( even when he is on taller side than usual.)



It's almost a like a cat in dog's family! lol.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B7NyUonUHo
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Old 12-30-2019, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
7,904 posts, read 4,568,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
Anyway thanks for the equine history lesson. Quite interesting.
A little more equine history for you: the Akhal-Teke is probably one of the foundation breeds of the modern Thoroughbred, which was created by crossing native British mares with stallions imported from North Africa, the Middle East, and Turkey (with no one keeping very good records of where the individual stallions actually came from). There are three foundation stallions that all modern Thoroughbreds trace their tail male line back to: the Darley Arabian, the Godolphin Arabian, and the Byerley Turk - and based on DNA studies, the latter two may have been Akhal-Tekes rather than Arabians. Akhal-Tekes also almost certainly numbered among the stallions now found way back in the tail female lines and mixed line pedigrees of most Thoroughbreds.

And of course Quarter Horses have Thoroughbred in their lineage - so your good solid workin' cow pony may have that skinny-as-a-toothpick horse as one of his VERY distant ancestors!
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Old 12-30-2019, 06:42 PM
 
Location: NW Nevada
14,634 posts, read 12,069,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aredhel View Post
A little more equine history for you: the Akhal-Teke is probably one of the foundation breeds of the modern Thoroughbred, which was created by crossing native British mares with stallions imported from North Africa, the Middle East, and Turkey (with no one keeping very good records of where the individual stallions actually came from). There are three foundation stallions that all modern Thoroughbreds trace their tail male line back to: the Darley Arabian, the Godolphin Arabian, and the Byerley Turk - and based on DNA studies, the latter two may have been Akhal-Tekes rather than Arabians. Akhal-Tekes also almost certainly numbered among the stallions now found way back in the tail female lines and mixed line pedigrees of most Thoroughbreds.

And of course Quarter Horses have Thoroughbred in their lineage - so your good solid workin' cow pony may have that skinny-as-a-toothpick horse as one of his VERY distant ancestors!
The AQHA stud books I have dont go that far back. LOL. I believe the very first listed in the registry is Wimpy. And that a LOT of books with a lot of names.

But yes Quarters have Thoroughbred in them. There are also two distinct Quarter lines. Running g and working. The runners have very marked Tbred looks but a bit heavier set. Their speed is of course in the quarter mile dash. Working lines are a lot heavier set though they are quick footed. Some would say cutting lines are separate and distinct but I do t differentiate. Cutting and penning are working activities.
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Old 01-01-2020, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
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It didn’t make the list, but really, doesn’t everyone love giraffes?
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Old 01-01-2020, 09:53 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
8,245 posts, read 7,151,495 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post


It may be the physique of that particular breed. Stronger than it looks!............
Well after learning the name of them and reading what's been posted about them here I did an online image search of Akhal-Teke horses. Not all of them have an identical build, some look sturdier than others, some look even skinnier than the one the OP posted. But one thing for sure they ALL have in common is stunning colours and patterns with that metallic sheen to them that blew me away. I even saw some that looked like they had a metallic chartreuse green tint, and some with pink copper tints to them, one that looked like chrome and another that looked like tarnished blue silver. Astounding!


I wonder if they are the origin of the phrase "A horse of a different colour".
.
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