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Old 05-08-2020, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Black Hammock Island
4,511 posts, read 13,252,192 times
Reputation: 4297

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I live in a suburban neighborhood, and bought here for a number of reasons, one being that the developer (in the 2000s) chose to leave many of the existing mature trees. That's one of the charms, that unlike most of the developments the acres were not completely clear-cut.

When people built or bought here they obviously knew the property came with trees. If someone doesn't like trees, then why buy a house with them? They do, and then proceed to either have some of them cut down or have the canopies raised. These are then the people whose roofs take a full brunt of hurricane winds and are damaged or top-heavy trees fall over. These are the people who have squirrels and raccoons nesting in soffits and attics. So, they then decide to take more trees down.

I just really don't understand it, how people cannot see the correlation between trees and undamaged homes. Trees that have stood for decades are the buffer for damaging winds and are designed to bend and sway protecting a home. Certainly an unhealthy tree is cause for concern, but a healthy tree is taken down for whatever reason is what I can't comprehend. Why don't people understand that if you take down the trees that are homes to squirrels they have no alternative but to seek shelter inside a house's roof?

I think I'm also confounded that these people do not realize and/or have no regard for how their trees affect the properties of neighbors. The argument "well, they are my trees and I can do what I want" just seems selfish. Neighbors on both sides of my property had extensive tree work done which has altered my property to a huge degree. Where there was shade there is none. Where sunlight was blocked from my patio it now sears the eyes. Where there was once a privacy buffer I can now watch many neighbors' TVs through their windows.

I guess this request for help to understand tree mentality, or maybe it's just venting, has been spurred by my neighbor across the street taking down a large majestic healthy oak tree in their front yard because it has a clump of mistletoe. If they have the money to spend to take down the tree, why not spend that money to just have the mistletoe removed? It is A clump, not an infestation.
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Old 05-08-2020, 01:58 PM
 
Location: on the wind
11,657 posts, read 5,354,543 times
Reputation: 38329
Quote:
Originally Posted by mawipafl View Post
I live in a suburban neighborhood, and bought here for a number of reasons, one being that the developer (in the 2000s) chose to leave many of the existing mature trees. That's one of the charms, that unlike most of the developments the acres were not completely clear-cut.

When people built or bought here they obviously knew the property came with trees. If someone doesn't like trees, then why buy a house with them? They do, and then proceed to either have some of them cut down or have the canopies raised. These are then the people whose roofs take a full brunt of hurricane winds and are damaged or top-heavy trees fall over. These are the people who have squirrels and raccoons nesting in soffits and attics. So, they then decide to take more trees down.

I just really don't understand it, how people cannot see the correlation between trees and undamaged homes. Trees that have stood for decades are the buffer for damaging winds and are designed to bend and sway protecting a home. Certainly an unhealthy tree is cause for concern, but a healthy tree is taken down for whatever reason is what I can't comprehend. Why don't people understand that if you take down the trees that are homes to squirrels they have no alternative but to seek shelter inside a house's roof?

I think I'm also confounded that these people do not realize and/or have no regard for how their trees affect the properties of neighbors. The argument "well, they are my trees and I can do what I want" just seems selfish. Neighbors on both sides of my property had extensive tree work done which has altered my property to a huge degree. Where there was shade there is none. Where sunlight was blocked from my patio it now sears the eyes. Where there was once a privacy buffer I can now watch many neighbors' TVs through their windows.

I guess this request for help to understand tree mentality, or maybe it's just venting, has been spurred by my neighbor across the street taking down a large majestic healthy oak tree in their front yard because it has a clump of mistletoe. If they have the money to spend to take down the tree, why not spend that money to just have the mistletoe removed? It is A clump, not an infestation.
There's no way to speculate about why property owners decide to buy a place with trees, fell the trees or prune them in some ridiculous manner. Too many possibilities. Most people pick a property for multiple reasons...how the house fits their needs, price of the property, how great the schools are, how close it is to work, on and on. Mature trees may or may not be the main reason. Most people consider trees property, not living beings. They feel they can do whatever they want with their property and don't always care what some neighbor thinks about it.

Did you ask them why they felled the tree? If not, how could anyone guess? Could be many reasons other than the mistletoe.
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Old 05-08-2020, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Black Hammock Island
4,511 posts, read 13,252,192 times
Reputation: 4297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
There's no way to speculate about why property owners decide to buy a place with trees, fell the trees or prune them in some ridiculous manner. Too many possibilities. Most people pick a property for multiple reasons...how the house fits their needs, price of the property, how great the schools are, how close it is to work, on and on. Mature trees may or may not be the main reason. Most people consider trees property, not living beings. They feel they can do whatever they want with their property and don't always care what some neighbor thinks about it.

Did you ask them why they felled the tree? If not, how could anyone guess? Could be many reasons other than the mistletoe.
At least we are on good terms with the folks across the street, and when I asked about the tree, it was because of the mistletoe, that it was recommended by a tree company to take the tree down. Ok, so "experts" spoke and they listened. (Read between the lines ... I'm being sarcastic about the expertise :-)
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Old 05-08-2020, 02:12 PM
 
8,552 posts, read 3,991,747 times
Reputation: 24142
Are they over 65? Elderly people hate trees.
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Old 05-08-2020, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Black Hammock Island
4,511 posts, read 13,252,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Are they over 65? Elderly people hate trees.
Actually in their 50s, active and outgoing 50s.
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Old 05-08-2020, 03:22 PM
 
Location: on the wind
11,657 posts, read 5,354,543 times
Reputation: 38329
Quote:
Originally Posted by mawipafl View Post
At least we are on good terms with the folks across the street, and when I asked about the tree, it was because of the mistletoe, that it was recommended by a tree company to take the tree down. Ok, so "experts" spoke and they listened. (Read between the lines ... I'm being sarcastic about the expertise :-)
Well, maybe they don't particularly like oaks and might prefer another species of tree in the yard. Maybe they don't like the mess, the interference with their lawn, the pollen, want more sun, etc. etc. The mistletoe was the last straw in their decision. Maybe there were other signs that the tree wasn't totally healthy or there were other reasons they recommended felling it (roots damaging the house or pipes, etc). The presence of one mistletoe clump on its own shouldn't dictate felling it, but maybe there were other smaller infestations starting up and the homeowners weren't willing to control them. Can't say, can't see it. Sounds sad though.

Last edited by Parnassia; 05-08-2020 at 03:51 PM..
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Old 05-09-2020, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Maine
6,143 posts, read 11,843,303 times
Reputation: 5888
Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Are they over 65? Elderly people hate trees.
Maine is the most forested state in the US and we have the oldest population. I don't think it's an age thing.
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Old 05-09-2020, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Huntsville Area
1,956 posts, read 597,663 times
Reputation: 2998
I have had quite a few pieces of real estate in recent years. My grandfather's old place burned, but two of the city's largest oak trees were in the front yard. They became diseased.

Hauling off an 8' in diameter oak tree with a tractor trailer truck and a crane was quite expensive. Before the second tree got to that point, we sold the land to a church for a parking lot for a fair price.

Sometimes an asset can also be a liability.

I have a lake house with a beautiful oak tree canopy. Unfortunately 2 trees were diseased, one from being hit by lightning. The tree truck came out and cut down the wrong tree. I had to pay $2K to get the two other trees down because they were entangled in electrical wires and had to be taken down piece by piece with a cherry picker truck. And the other trees shed limbs every year--hard work to clear.

Our new home is without large trees, and we're thrilled.
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Old 05-10-2020, 05:01 AM
 
Location: Black Hammock Island
4,511 posts, read 13,252,192 times
Reputation: 4297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamaman1 View Post
I have had quite a few pieces of real estate in recent years. My grandfather's old place burned, but two of the city's largest oak trees were in the front yard. They became diseased.

Hauling off an 8' in diameter oak tree with a tractor trailer truck and a crane was quite expensive. Before the second tree got to that point, we sold the land to a church for a parking lot for a fair price.

Sometimes an asset can also be a liability.

I have a lake house with a beautiful oak tree canopy. Unfortunately 2 trees were diseased, one from being hit by lightning. The tree truck came out and cut down the wrong tree. I had to pay $2K to get the two other trees down because they were entangled in electrical wires and had to be taken down piece by piece with a cherry picker truck. And the other trees shed limbs every year--hard work to clear.

Our new home is without large trees, and we're thrilled.
"Sometimes an asset can also be a liability" ... very very true. Trees that are damaged or diseased or have grown into electrical wires to a point in which trimming back isn't possible unfortunately do have to come down. These trees pose dangers to the environment, properties, and people.
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Old 05-10-2020, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Black Hammock Island
4,511 posts, read 13,252,192 times
Reputation: 4297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Writer View Post
Maine is the most forested state in the US and we have the oldest population. I don't think it's an age thing.
Thinking about it, I wonder if the opposite is true, that it's not older people but younger people who seem to have a bigger aversion to trees. My neighbors to each side are in their 30s and 40s.

Any readers in their 30s and 40s please do not be offended by what I next write because I am not trying to stereotype nor generalize to say those in these age groups don't know what yard work is. Or know what it is and don't want to do it. Maybe the toiling to rake leaves and remove pine needles from gutters outweighs any benefit of trees, so they are taken down.
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