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Old 05-16-2020, 01:36 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
9,138 posts, read 7,759,467 times
Reputation: 18978

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mawipafl View Post
I looked up a photo ... wow, sphinx moths are interesting ... their larvae even more so!

Only one photo? If so that's not good enough. Did you look at all the photos of sphinx moths? There is more than one species, there are several and they don't all look the same. There's a few examples shown below.

I suspect you saw snowberry clearwing sphinx moths hovering near the horse's belly, but it may have been some other variety of sphinx moth. Another possibility is skipper butterflies, they are capable of hovering in place and some grass dart skippers have patterns similar to those of bees. But there are thousands of species of skippers and most of them are quite small so it would be hard to find what you're looking for.

The moths and butterflies that hover in place will sip on sweat, urine, tears from the eyes, blood from small scrapes or cuts and any other bodily fluids and secretions, or from wet mud that might accumulate on the bellies and other body parts of livestock. They do NOT eat tiny insects of any kind, they are not carnivorous. No adult butterflies or moths of any kind anywhere in the world are capable of being carnivorous. They have a proboscis for sucking fluids only, they do not have a mouth.

clearwings: https://www.google.ca/search?q=clear...w=1120&bih=583

snowberry clearwings: https://www.google.ca/search?q=snowb...h=583&biw=1120

.
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Old 05-16-2020, 05:17 PM
 
1,299 posts, read 1,043,568 times
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@mawipafl did you get pictures yet?

My curiosity has gone up a couple notches after looking at the links @zoisite posted
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Old 05-16-2020, 06:45 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
9,138 posts, read 7,759,467 times
Reputation: 18978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Normashirley View Post
@mawipafl did you get pictures yet?

My curiosity has gone up a couple notches after looking at the links @zoisite posted

If you think those sphinxes are interesting, check out these many beautiful types of hawk moths, some of them are known as hummingbird or bee hawk moths.


https://www.google.ca/search?q=hawk+...w=1120&bih=583

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 05-16-2020 at 07:02 PM..
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Old 05-16-2020, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Black Hammock Island
4,437 posts, read 13,109,822 times
Reputation: 4146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Only one photo? If so that's not good enough. Did you look at all the photos of sphinx moths? There is more than one species, there are several and they don't all look the same. There's a few examples shown below.

I suspect you saw snowberry clearwing sphinx moths hovering near the horse's belly, but it may have been some other variety of sphinx moth. Another possibility is skipper butterflies, they are capable of hovering in place and some grass dart skippers have patterns similar to those of bees. But there are thousands of species of skippers and most of them are quite small so it would be hard to find what you're looking for.

The moths and butterflies that hover in place will sip on sweat, urine, tears from the eyes, blood from small scrapes or cuts and any other bodily fluids and secretions, or from wet mud that might accumulate on the bellies and other body parts of livestock. They do NOT eat tiny insects of any kind, they are not carnivorous. No adult butterflies or moths of any kind anywhere in the world are capable of being carnivorous. They have a proboscis for sucking fluids only, they do not have a mouth.

clearwings: https://www.google.ca/search?q=clear...w=1120&bih=583

snowberry clearwings: https://www.google.ca/search?q=snowb...h=583&biw=1120

.
I should have been more clear ... I looked at many photos of sphinx moths! The "mystery insect" does not have the body type of a lepidoptera.
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Old 05-16-2020, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Black Hammock Island
4,437 posts, read 13,109,822 times
Reputation: 4146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
If you think those sphinxes are interesting, check out these many beautiful types of hawk moths, some of them are known as hummingbird or bee hawk moths.


https://www.google.ca/search?q=hawk+...w=1120&bih=583

.
I think moths are deemed "boring" since most folks only see the beige winged things fluttering around outside lights. Some are just as beautiful as butterflies and much more unusual!
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Old 05-17-2020, 07:48 AM
 
2,255 posts, read 1,150,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Fork Fantast View Post
Of course there are those new Killer Hornets in WA State. They prey on honey bees. Hope it isn't them!

Asian Giant Hornets have only been found in Washington State (and very few of them at that), as far from Florida as you can possibly get within the lower 48. There is zero reason to believe they are in any other state.
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:26 AM
 
862 posts, read 233,626 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deserterer View Post
Asian Giant Hornets have only been found in Washington State (and very few of them at that), as far from Florida as you can possibly get within the lower 48. There is zero reason to believe they are in any other state.

As of now. But what's to stop them?
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Southern MN
7,490 posts, read 4,271,379 times
Reputation: 26656
Quote:
Originally Posted by mawipafl View Post
I think moths are deemed "boring" since most folks only see the beige winged things fluttering around outside lights. Some are just as beautiful as butterflies and much more unusual!
My dad use to plant four o' clocks as a border around his vegetable garden. Then in the late afternoon we'd go out and sit in the back yard and watch the sphinx moths come for their supper.

Mom pointed out to me the aforementioned proboscis which curls inside their mouth area in a perfect spiral. It's surprisingly long and can reach the bottom of a trumpet-shaped flower. When the guest is done with its meal you can watch it roll back up again to tuck safely inside. It was anything but boring.

As my very respectable school-teaching mother used to say, we didn't need no "stinkin' TV."
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:03 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
16,774 posts, read 10,064,355 times
Reputation: 23455
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deserterer View Post
Asian Giant Hornets have only been found in Washington State (and very few of them at that), as far from Florida as you can possibly get within the lower 48. There is zero reason to believe they are in any other state.
Quote:
Originally Posted by james112 View Post
As of now. But what's to stop them?
A year ago I was visited by something that certainly could have been a giant hornet. I was already aware of their existence, so I stood still until it lost interest and moved on.
It was big, noisy and fast as all get out. I breathed a little easier when it left. I knew better than to try to swat at it.
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:10 AM
 
862 posts, read 233,626 times
Reputation: 1753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
A year ago I was visited by something that certainly could have been a giant hornet. I was already aware of their existence, so I stood still until it lost interest and moved on.
It was big, noisy and fast as all get out. I breathed a little easier when it left. I knew better than to try to swat at it.

What state was this?
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