U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-06-2020, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
17,806 posts, read 11,320,627 times
Reputation: 31842

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I thought that we had a bear hanging around from all the garbage cans torn apart. Yesterday morning I watched as it slowly walked across the front of my property. It's a big one at probably around 400 pounds. Of course that is just a guess and I could be wrong? But I wasn't going to coax it onto any scale!

good move. or rather non move. Wouldn't want to insult a bear by calling it fat.






Don't know if it's a valid fear or not but I feel safer seeing a bear than hearing a pack of coyotes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-06-2020, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
16,368 posts, read 13,131,087 times
Reputation: 12317
Quote:
Originally Posted by PAhippo View Post
good move. or rather non move. Wouldn't want to insult a bear by calling it fat.






Don't know if it's a valid fear or not but I feel safer seeing a bear than hearing a pack of coyotes.
I do not see bear frequently. I think it was over twenty years when we first saw our first bear cross our property. We saw signs that one was in the area on several occasions; but did not see the bear. Of course it all depends on where you live.

To the best of my knowledge horses, cows, pigs and dogs kill far more people than bear. Of course that still does not make it safe to ask one to stand on your scale.

Years ago we had a bear that was running towards my late wife. She ran into the house before it got to her. But our apple trees were on the other side of where she was standing and we think that it was more interested in the fruit than it was in her.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2020, 05:14 PM
 
Location: on the wind
10,645 posts, read 4,839,826 times
Reputation: 35446
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Years ago we had a bear that was running towards my late wife. She ran into the house before it got to her. But our apple trees were on the other side of where she was standing and we think that it was more interested in the fruit than it was in her.
It was probably running away from some other human! 99.999% of bears (either black or brown) have no predatory intentions toward humans. Unfortunately, bears don't carry wallet cards identifying them as .0001 percenters. Come to think of it they don't carry wallets either.

I love seeing bears on my property. Obviously its not a good idea to attract them for my own enjoyment. That increases their risk of being shot by some paranoid neighbor. Too many people out there who can't wait to prove they coexist with nature because they can kill it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2020, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
16,368 posts, read 13,131,087 times
Reputation: 12317
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
It was probably running away from some other human! 99.999% of bears (either black or brown) have no predatory intentions toward humans. Unfortunately, bears don't carry wallet cards identifying them as .0001 percenters. Come to think of it they don't carry wallets either.

I love seeing bears on my property. Obviously its not a good idea to attract them for my own enjoyment. That increases their risk of being shot by some paranoid neighbor. Too many people out there who can't wait to prove they coexist with nature because they can kill it.
It also depends on hour your state treats 'nuisance' bears. If your state is like mine they only get three chances and then will be euthanized by your game commission. Of course people create the nuisance bears by feeding them or leaving out food and garbage. Then we complain when they make a mess of they get too close!

Here is one good example of how things can go wrong when people interfere with wildlife: https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news...unter/1862702/. When wildlife loses its fear of humans we set them up as targets for legal hunting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2020, 01:39 PM
 
Location: on the wind
10,645 posts, read 4,839,826 times
Reputation: 35446
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
It also depends on hour your state treats 'nuisance' bears. If your state is like mine they only get three chances and then will be euthanized by your game commission. Of course people create the nuisance bears by feeding them or leaving out food and garbage. Then we complain when they make a mess of they get too close!

Here is one good example of how things can go wrong when people interfere with wildlife: https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news...unter/1862702/. When wildlife loses its fear of humans we set them up as targets for legal hunting.
I tried to find specific AK state policy on dealing with nuisance bears (how many chances one gets) but only found the usual recommendations for human behavior and vague statements about destroying particular bears. It may not be formally stated anywhere and is left to a case-by-case basis. I have friends who work for ADF&G so suppose I could ask. I don't know how "tolerant" the state is, considering that bear populations are healthy, the human/bear interface is huge, and bears are legal game species. I know they mark and haze problem bears...most land managing agencies take part in that and I've done it myself. The "blame" for bear conflicts rests on the humans first as it should, so the first attempts are always actions to be taken by the humans...cleaning up the obvious attractants. There are big time penalties for not controlling attractants or deliberately habituating a bear. Its not as if food options for bears are rare. Take away the nuisance and the bears go away.

I've never heard that the state attempts to relocate nuisance bears. There are thousands of bears in the state. That ecological niche is full. Relocating them successfully would be logistically and ecologically difficult and that doesn't solve the problem anyway if the human behavior that created the problem still exists. Relocated bears probably don't survive anyway...not only because they end up disadvantaged by being dumped in a strange area with day to day hazards, but because the other resident brown and black bears can also prey on them. We have statutes that permit residents to kill bears "in defense of life and property" and again, bears are legally hunted game. IDLP bear killings are rigorously investigated by the state but I suspect they never hear about many of them. Too many smaller more remote communities with no state enforcement presence...problem bears just end up disappearing quietly or end up in someone's freezer. It could be that an individual nuisance bear's odds of living long enough to need those "chances" is quite low.

Last edited by Parnassia; 06-07-2020 at 01:58 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2020, 05:14 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
16,368 posts, read 13,131,087 times
Reputation: 12317
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
I tried to find specific AK state policy on dealing with nuisance bears (how many chances one gets) but only found the usual recommendations for human behavior and vague statements about destroying particular bears. It may not be formally stated anywhere and is left to a case-by-case basis. I have friends who work for ADF&G so suppose I could ask. I don't know how "tolerant" the state is, considering that bear populations are healthy, the human/bear interface is huge, and bears are legal game species. I know they mark and haze problem bears...most land managing agencies take part in that and I've done it myself. The "blame" for bear conflicts rests on the humans first as it should, so the first attempts are always actions to be taken by the humans...cleaning up the obvious attractants. There are big time penalties for not controlling attractants or deliberately habituating a bear. Its not as if food options for bears are rare. Take away the nuisance and the bears go away.

I've never heard that the state attempts to relocate nuisance bears. There are thousands of bears in the state. That ecological niche is full. Relocating them successfully would be logistically and ecologically difficult and that doesn't solve the problem anyway if the human behavior that created the problem still exists. Relocated bears probably don't survive anyway...not only because they end up disadvantaged by being dumped in a strange area with day to day hazards, but because the other resident brown and black bears can also prey on them. We have statutes that permit residents to kill bears "in defense of life and property" and again, bears are legally hunted game. IDLP bear killings are rigorously investigated by the state but I suspect they never hear about many of them. Too many smaller more remote communities with no state enforcement presence...problem bears just end up disappearing quietly or end up in someone's freezer. It could be that an individual nuisance bear's odds of living long enough to need those "chances" is quite low.
One other problem, if your State is like mine, is the game commissions don't have the manpower during the off-season months. Their ranks swell as the game seasons start and then they cut back during the warmer months. During our summers we have one central office that covers three counties.

I had a raccoon that was acting funny in the middle of the daytime and I called our Game Commission; it was in the middle of the summer. They asked me if I could euthanize the animal because they were short handed. I was expecting them to drop everything and come running! They told me to shoot it and pour some full strength bleach on the body before bagging in a plastic bar for the garbage. But their location was over an hour away from me at that time. So it might have been 'safer' for me to handle the problem. But I will never really know if the animal did have rabies or distemper?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2020, 05:28 AM
 
Location: The North Star State
2,523 posts, read 766,876 times
Reputation: 10783
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marie Joseph View Post
It's not uncommon to see bears in the more suburban parts of the city and really common to see them in the rural areas of the county. I live in the more 'burb part of the city but haven't seen one there. I have seen them on the ride home from work on a couple of rare occasions since I work in a rural area and the way to/from work is a 2-lane highway.

I didn't even know that this happened until one of my employees who moved here from New Mexico last year sent me a message saying 'ready to move back to NM anytime now!' because this was very close to where she lives.

https://www.erienewsnow.com/story/42...eU1tj3AUT1sLkE

Who else here has bears living nearby?
I'm in southern Minnesota, so no bears here (except for the very rare straggler wandering through) but when I lived in Duluth at a particular house, I saw bears in the year three times over my eight-month residence there. One wandered across the deck once. Another time I went out the door and there was a bear about thirty feet away. Startling, but from the way it shot up a tree to get away from me I take it I wasn't the most started of the two of us.

Anyway, we have about 15,000 bears in Minnesota, almost all of them in the northeast quadrant of the state. And in recorded history, we have but six documented attacks by bears on people. Anyone who can do basic math should understand that the potential of bear attack shouldn't rate anywhere near the top one thousand reasons to live or not to live somewhere.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2020, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
16,368 posts, read 13,131,087 times
Reputation: 12317
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2x3x29x41 View Post
I'm in southern Minnesota, so no bears here (except for the very rare straggler wandering through) but when I lived in Duluth at a particular house, I saw bears in the year three times over my eight-month residence there. One wandered across the deck once. Another time I went out the door and there was a bear about thirty feet away. Startling, but from the way it shot up a tree to get away from me I take it I wasn't the most started of the two of us.

Anyway, we have about 15,000 bears in Minnesota, almost all of them in the northeast quadrant of the state. And in recorded history, we have but six documented attacks by bears on people. Anyone who can do basic math should understand that the potential of bear attack shouldn't rate anywhere near the top one thousand reasons to live or not to live somewhere.
Cows, bulls, horses, dogs and deer are the deadliest animals in the US: https://www.topteny.com/top-10-deadliest-animals-usa/. I think the left out pigs. According to that website there were only 30 reported bear attacks in the last 10 years. Considering our population your odds are very low of being attacked by a bear. However; they should be respected and never fed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2020, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Colorado
14,415 posts, read 8,717,577 times
Reputation: 26142
I'm in Colorado Springs, in an area that can best be described as highly developed suburbia. Lots of the strip malls and big box stores, residential developments and such. But the way this city is laid out, we also have wild lands with trails established that are surrounded by development, too. Minutes from my home is a trail system I've come to love that traverses some mildly challenging terrain, bluffs and ravines, very much rattlesnake country. We have mule deer everywhere, and in the city they have no concern about people. I've had them calmly plod on past me on the trail like hey howdy neighbor. Not skittish at all, unlike the whitetails I grew up with back east. They walk along rather like horses.

And bears. Yep, we have black bears. Thing about them is that they really aren't that aggressive towards people. They want our trash, generally speaking, and our bird-feeders. Easy sources of food left out there seemingly for them, why not? And they'll go into the city after it. There was a German restaurant that kept having their dumpster "stolen" so they put up security cameras. And caught the culprit, a black bear who would take hold of it like an oversized shopping cart and walk it out of the alley to a quiet parking lot in the night to pilfer at its leisure! That video sure made the rounds on the internet, and they learned to chain up and lock shut the dumpsters. There were posts on Nextdoor recently about a young, clearly juvenile black bear wandering in neighborhoods just minutes (minutes on foot, not even by car) from my house. It got a few bird feeders.

A friend of mine works in animal rescue (she's hardcore about this stuff) and she said that she hopes my neighbors didn't report it to the Parks & Wildlife people. I guess they have a 3 strikes rule on bears discovered in human dense areas, they'll come tranq and tag or collar it first, and relocate it, and they'll relocate it once more if it's found near people again, but the third time, they euthanize. That's unfortunate. We are in their territory, and they're not really much of a threat to people here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Nature
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top