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Old 05-31-2020, 02:43 PM
 
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I know they are compulsives. Haven't studied them enough to know if that extends to doing a particular thing/location on a particular day of the week. That is, perhaps Sunday is the day for your house.
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Old 05-31-2020, 03:58 PM
KB4 KB4 started this thread
 
Location: New York
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Well, one of them came by about two hours ago! He/she carried a mouthful of dry grass into the nest and then disappeared. It reminds me of the time when we bought the house and still stayed in the city for a few weeks while we were having some work done in the house. I used to drive up on the weekend to check on the house.
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Old 06-01-2020, 10:01 AM
 
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Last year we had wrens building a nest in a small watering can that had been left on its side. We noticed the twigs and grass stuffed into the can weeks before the birds actually took up residence. They finally decided to raise a family there and we enjoyed watching them darting back and forth with bugs and calling to each other, until the babies grew up and moved out.

In the fall my husband emptied out the watering can, thinking they wouldn't use it again. I was upset because I had heard they will come back to the same location. I set the can back exactly where it had been, and this spring the wrens came back, promptly refilled the inside with twigs and raised another family. They are very fun little creatures to watch.

Last edited by saibot; 06-01-2020 at 10:27 AM..
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Old 06-01-2020, 11:21 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
4,027 posts, read 1,573,574 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShakenStirred View Post
They probably have some essential bird business going on during the week. Sunday is their day of rest.

Yea, I was thinkin' they're a couple of ex-hippy wrens nearing retirement and planning on homesteading out in the sticks in the near future. They're just getting the place ready in their spare time. I bet they're going to keep chickens and grow kale.
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Old 06-01-2020, 12:27 PM
KB4 KB4 started this thread
 
Location: New York
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Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Yea, I was thinkin' they're a couple of ex-hippy wrens nearing retirement and planning on homesteading out in the sticks in the near future. They're just getting the place ready in their spare time. I bet they're going to keep chickens and grow kale.
Yes, that must be it!
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Old 06-01-2020, 12:33 PM
 
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That wren is having a little mistress on the side. The house repairs are just a cover story.
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Old 06-01-2020, 05:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by KB4 View Post
A wren couple has been building a nest inside the hanging flower basket outside my kitchen window. But they are behaving as if it was their weekend house. They come on Sunday and do some serious building and then they disappear until the next weekend. It's not a male bird trying to attract females, it's a couple. It's been going on a few weekends now. What is going on?

Maybe they have a couple of nests at once.
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Old 06-03-2020, 09:22 AM
KB4 KB4 started this thread
 
Location: New York
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While it's hard to see inside the nest, we suspect that one of them might be inside. Instead of building material, the other bird is now flying to the nest with what appears to be food. Very exciting, hopefully there will be baby birds at some point.
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Old 06-04-2020, 07:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Last year we had wrens building a nest in a small watering can that had been left on its side. We noticed the twigs and grass stuffed into the can weeks before the birds actually took up residence. They finally decided to raise a family there and we enjoyed watching them darting back and forth with bugs and calling to each other, until the babies grew up and moved out.

In the fall my husband emptied out the watering can, thinking they wouldn't use it again. I was upset because I had heard they will come back to the same location. I set the can back exactly where it had been, and this spring the wrens came back, promptly refilled the inside with twigs and raised another family. They are very fun little creatures to watch.
It's actually good that your husband cleared out the nest from the watering can. Especially with stick nests made by wrens, ants and other critters will often take up residence, making it less attractive--and even hazardous--as a nest site.

Most birds build new nests each year, so it's best to clean out all boxes or other enclosed nesting places so that they can have a clean start. A few years ago, I left up a Robin's nest which was built in the open on top of a plank in a barn. The Robin returned the next year to the same spot. Instead of using the old nest, a new nest was built atop the old nest. That nesting spot is now a triple-decker, with a double-decker right beside it!
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Old 06-04-2020, 02:05 PM
 
Location: on the wind
10,777 posts, read 4,891,574 times
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Originally Posted by jackmichigan View Post
It's actually good that your husband cleared out the nest from the watering can. Especially with stick nests made by wrens, ants and other critters will often take up residence, making it less attractive--and even hazardous--as a nest site.

Most birds build new nests each year, so it's best to clean out all boxes or other enclosed nesting places so that they can have a clean start. A few years ago, I left up a Robin's nest which was built in the open on top of a plank in a barn. The Robin returned the next year to the same spot. Instead of using the old nest, a new nest was built atop the old nest. That nesting spot is now a triple-decker, with a double-decker right beside it!
I remember reading about the collapse of a bald eagle nest tree popular with local visitors. Eagles will come back to the same nest trees year after year. As part of courtship the pairs add new layers of material on top of existing ones. Eagles had used this tree for decades. Apparently the old spruce couldn't take it any more. They weighed all the nesting materials...more than a ton!

Last edited by Parnassia; 06-04-2020 at 03:20 PM..
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