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Old 07-20-2023, 06:55 AM
 
6,706 posts, read 5,935,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PossumMan View Post
I preface this by saying I have spent an extensive amount of time in remote areas of the lower 48, staying out for many months at a time over the past 40 years. The longest I stayed out was 19 months some 40 years ago.

In my estimation predators are increasing their range and are getting more aggressive toward humans. I have had negative experiences with cougars in NM, SD, black bears in NC, SC, NM, AR, TN, MO, CO, SD, VA, WI, gators in FL, GA, NC, LA and boars/hogs in AR and TX and coyotes and wild dogs in numerous locations.

As opposed to the OP would not like to see them extinct as much as exterminated in the lower 48 and possibly held on reserves or in zoos. But realistically with today's dna technology we no longer need vast breeding populations to maintain a healthy collection of specimens and can reduce populations down to a captive specimens only.

Moreover I believe you should be able to kill any and all animals on your private property for any reason. This especially applies to ranchers.

By the way, for those who buy the hype of bear sprays might want to digest this link before a bear digests you.

https://www.outsideonline.com/outdoo...ar-spray-work/

Grizzly bears - there is a reason native Americans feared them and killed them whenever they could. These creatures are savage killers and no human is safe around them. And they are crafty. There fur is awesome for coats.

Mountain lions - these are terribly sneaky ambush killers no human is safe from -I almost got attacked in NM in the Gila in 1983, fortunately my spider-sense warned me and I scared it off by firing .38 into a tree. I had one rush me in the back Hills in SD and then stop short when I twirled my 6 foot hiking staff in a fast figure 8 pattern. I ate some once in Mexico - it is delicious - yummy.

Black bears - always dangerous, and cooperative hunters, much smarter than you might think. At a minimum the states like Iowa who did not have them should eradicate any that enter and stay bear free. States like TN, VA need to seriously reduce populations. But I would not care if every last one of these killers was eradicated from the lower 48. One stalked me for 3 days in Caney Creek AR. It seems my bear spray was more of an appetizer than a deterrent. It finally charged me, I put three .38 in it and that deterred it. Rangers then hunted it down, it had been terrorizing campers in the area and they had shut down many campgrounds. I had hiked in from a road so I missed the postings. I have had many negative black bear encounters over the years. They are killers.

Gators- please, these things are menace- period. I had many gator problems in FL, LA, NC, and GA. Kill every last one in human areas. The meat is excellent and they make nice shoes.

Wild hogs. Every last one of these killers should be eradicated. I have had to shoot 4 over the years in self defense and defend myself with my staff many times. So much so, I acquired a WWI French bayonet to afix to it when I hike in black bear or hog country. That gives me 8 feet of lethality between them and me and I can bring it into play immediately as my hands are already on it.

Pit Bulls. Incredibly dangerous, hard to kill. Most cities should regulate them out and it should be legal to shoot any off leash that are not on the owners private property.

Rattle snakes coral snakes etc. Kill them. Rattlers are ok eating.
You're quite the outdoorsman!

I would just note that feral hogs and wild boar (cousins but not exactly the same thing) are invasive in the Americas and should be eradicated. They do massive damage to crops and natural environments and have no natural predators.

When I say no natural predators, in reality there are many predators of piglets; large birds of prey, coyotes, cougars, even alligators have been known to eat newborns and juveniles.

Once upon a time, North America had lions and smilodons (sabre-toothed cats) that were apex predators and could have devastated the boar population. It's possible that a modern day grizzly could take out a boar, but full grown boars are formidable adversaries and would put up a fight. There have been documented cases of boar killing black bears.

For hunting enthusiasts, wild boar are a Godsend. Hunting season in many states is almost year round, although in at least one state (Missouri, I think?) they have decided to disallow most private hunting of boar, in favor of professional trapping and hunting. Why? Because private hunters can actually cause the boar population to increase. If you don't take out an entire sounder (clan of boar), they will reproduce more quickly to replenish the population), similar to coyotes. So they use feed traps, large fenced enclosures with a pile of delicious food to entice the boar. When it looks like the entire sounder is in there feeding, the gate suddenly closes and they are trapped. Then they are put down and the meat harvested for whatever purpose.
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Old 07-20-2023, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Dessert
10,897 posts, read 7,389,984 times
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There are lots of examples of how killing off one species disrupts the environment.

For instance, in China's Great Leap Forward, farmers were mobilized to kill the starlings which ate crops, nearly exterminating them. But with the starlings gone, locust populations soared, and the insects--formerly kept in check by the birds--destroyed far more crops, which led to famine and millions of deaths.

Introducing animals doesn't work out well, either; like rabbits in Australia, and mongoose in Hawaii.

A few years ago, I read that scientists had developed sterile male mosquitos that could possibly wipe that pest off the face of the earth.
But what if it had unforseen consequences?
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Old 07-20-2023, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
50,374 posts, read 63,977,343 times
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I was going to say mosquitoes, but I fear eliminating anything would have unintended consequences.
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Old 07-20-2023, 07:23 AM
 
6,706 posts, read 5,935,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steiconi View Post
There are lots of examples of how killing off one species disrupts the environment.

For instance, in China's Great Leap Forward, farmers were mobilized to kill the starlings which ate crops, nearly exterminating them. But with the starlings gone, locust populations soared, and the insects--formerly kept in check by the birds--destroyed far more crops, which led to famine and millions of deaths.

Introducing animals doesn't work out well, either; like rabbits in Australia, and mongoose in Hawaii.

A few years ago, I read that scientists had developed sterile male mosquitos that could possibly wipe that pest off the face of the earth.
But what if it had unforseen consequences?
They conducted such a trial in Queensland, Australia in 2021, releasing 3 million male mosquitoes sterilized by a bacteria. A few months later, it was found that nearly all of the target population (Aedes Aegypti, an invasive species) was gone from that area.

In Brazil, plagued with invasive Aedes Aegypti carrying zika, the disease that causes terrible birth defects, they released a genetically modified male into the Sao Paulo area (as I recall), and it did bring down the population. However, it was later found that some mosquitoes had adapted to the gene change.

In theory, it's possible to completely wipe out mosquitoes by means of a "gene drive" meaning future offspring of the modified mosquitoes will be sterile; the sterility will spread exponentially through the population until they no longer exist.

Great idea, as long as it doesn't create a super-mosquito or a "killer mosquito" mutant as happened with the Africanized honey bee fiasco in South America.
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Old 07-20-2023, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
15,218 posts, read 10,315,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PossumMan View Post
I preface this by saying I have spent an extensive amount of time in remote areas of the lower 48, staying out for many months at a time over the past 40 years. The longest I stayed out was 19 months some 40 years ago.



Moreover I believe you should be able to kill any and all animals on your private property for any reason. This especially applies to ranchers.
I don't think a wild animal recognizes property lines. A human has never been killed by a black bear in Florida. You really sound like you hate wildlife.

Last edited by PJSaturn; 07-23-2023 at 01:42 PM.. Reason: Fixed technical glitch in quote.
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Old 07-20-2023, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Virginia
10,093 posts, read 6,433,756 times
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[quote=chiluvr1228;65575632]
Quote:
Originally Posted by PossumMan View Post
I preface this by saying I have spent an extensive amount of time in remote areas of the lower 48, staying out for many months at a time over the past 40 years. The longest I stayed out was 19 months some 40 years ago.



Moreover I believe you should be able to kill any and all animals on your private property for any reason. This especially applies to ranchers.

I don't think a wild animal recognizes property lines. A human has never been killed by a black bear in Florida. You really sound like you hate wildlife.
Black bears are not a real danger in VA either. Most of them, which show up frequently in subdivisions and more rural housing areas, are primarily young males looking for new home ranges. Black bears are typically shy and reclusive and can easily be avoided. Their only natural predator is humans.
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Old 07-20-2023, 11:12 AM
 
2,035 posts, read 990,377 times
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Yeah I don't use clickbait articles about the rare animal attack to make me wish something was extinct.

Mosquitoes. there is no second choice
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Old 07-20-2023, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Chicago
2,234 posts, read 2,405,241 times
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Pigeons. They might not be dangerous, but they are some of the most disgusting creatures I have been around.
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Old 07-20-2023, 03:42 PM
 
17,874 posts, read 15,947,840 times
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The dread Chihuahua, or bedbugs.
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Old 07-20-2023, 03:44 PM
 
17,874 posts, read 15,947,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kgordeeva View Post
Pigeons. They might not be dangerous, but they are some of the most disgusting creatures I have been around.
We should just eat them.
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