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View Poll Results: If you had to choose just one, would you say Nebraska is more like the Dakotas or Kansas?
The Dakotas 12 41.38%
Kansas 17 58.62%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-17-2015, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
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To me, what's considered the Midwest ends in the eastern half of ND, SD, NE, and KS. The western half of all these states is where the West starts. Different terrain and different lifestyles.

If comparing only NE, SD, and KS I agree with most posting here that Nebraska is a little more like SD if comparing the non-reservation land. If you throw in all the rez's the closer comparison for Nebraska would be Kansas.
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Old 03-17-2015, 04:47 PM
 
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Eastern Nebraska is definitely compatible with Iowa, with its rolling green hills and fields of corn and soybeans. In contrast, I remember once being in Dodge City, Kansas, and that had a western feel, oriented towards Denver. It felt quite remote, and not very midwestern at all..

I think that the population stock of Nebraska has more in common with the Dakotas than Kansas, especially with all the descendants of northern European immigrants in NE, more so than in KS..
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Old 03-17-2015, 08:50 PM
 
Location: United States
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Eastern NE = Iowa
Far western NE = Wyoming
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Old 03-21-2015, 06:51 PM
 
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Nebraska is very unique as a state. I'd definetely say more like south dakota terrain-wise and more like kansas population-wise.

The sandhills, with dunes up to 400ft high, cover about a quarter of the entire state, exists in the north-central portion. Buttes, mesas, badlands and areas of large hills (mainly up to 500ft, a few up to 800ft) exist in the western and norther tiers of our state.

Then the eastern third of our state is covered with gently rolling hills.
South-central and southwest Nebraska look a lot more like Kansas.

Population -
South Dakota 880,000 with a city of 150k (200 metro), another with 80k (150 metro)
Nebraska 1,890,000 with a city of 435k (900,000 metro), another with 285k (315,000 metro) that is only 22 miles of empty fields away.
Kansas 2,900,000 with a city of 150k (part of a 2,000,000 metro),another with 380k (600,000 metro)

Nebraska is loaded with money generating corporations. 5 fortune five hundred companys, 11 fortune 1000. The most of the three.
Kansas City is in Kansas, so it can be considered the only state of the three with pro sports.
South Dakota has a lot harsher winters, but it has a nice mountain range and badlands area.
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Old 03-22-2015, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
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just to toss in an FYI, the Sandhills are really in central NE.
There are only a few pockets that extend north to highway 20 (or south of the interstate)
Nor does SD have any mountains, much less a range. The Black Hills are just that; BIG hills.
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Old 03-22-2015, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Omahahonors View Post
Nebraska is very unique as a state. I'd definetely say more like south dakota terrain-wise and more like kansas population-wise.

The sandhills, with dunes up to 400ft high, cover about a quarter of the entire state, exists in the north-central portion. Buttes, mesas, badlands and areas of large hills (mainly up to 500ft, a few up to 800ft) exist in the western and norther tiers of our state.

Then the eastern third of our state is covered with gently rolling hills.
South-central and southwest Nebraska look a lot more like Kansas.

Population -
South Dakota 880,000 with a city of 150k (200 metro), another with 80k (150 metro)
Nebraska 1,890,000 with a city of 435k (900,000 metro), another with 285k (315,000 metro) that is only 22 miles of empty fields away.
Kansas 2,900,000 with a city of 150k (part of a 2,000,000 metro),another with 380k (600,000 metro)

Nebraska is loaded with money generating corporations. 5 fortune five hundred companys, 11 fortune 1000. The most of the three.
Kansas City is in Kansas, so it can be considered the only state of the three with pro sports.
South Dakota has a lot harsher winters, but it has a nice mountain range and badlands area.
One little correction. Most of Kansas City resides in Missouri which is also where all the pro sports teams play.

Also, calling the Black Hills a mountain range may be a little bit of a stretch. It's a gorgeous area with lots to see, but the only area that may a bit of a mountain range would be the area south around where Mt. Rushmore is. Other than that it's heavily forested large hills.
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Old 03-22-2015, 01:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
One little correction. Most of Kansas City resides in Missouri which is also where all the pro sports teams play.

Also, calling the Black Hills a mountain range may be a little bit of a stretch. It's a gorgeous area with lots to see, but the only area that may a bit of a mountain range would be the area south around where Mt. Rushmore is. Other than that it's heavily forested large hills.
There are hills there large enough to be considered mountains by definition (1000+ feet from base to summit). That said, I love visiting Rapid City as much as any other mountain, mountain (ish) area.
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Old 03-22-2015, 01:43 PM
 
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To be specific with the sandhills.. it is located in central and north central, but not south central. Which is why it is often referred to covering one quarter of the state's land mass, centered in the north central portion.

800,000 of the 2,000,000 live in kansas. So the 'majority' living in Missouri is true, but a 40-60 ratio and closing with the current growth rates.

Kansas City, Kansas is home to a Nascar race track. Not only that, but I admitted that the other pro sports are in mizzou, but the sports teams are KC based teams. They are intended for all of kc, not just the mizzou-side. Let's not get into the overly smart-ass technicalities, you knew exactly what I was talking about.
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Old 03-22-2015, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
4,189 posts, read 5,856,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Omahahonors View Post
To be specific with the sandhills.. it is located in central and north central, but not south central. Which is why it is often referred to covering one quarter of the state's land mass, centered in the north central portion.

800,000 of the 2,000,000 live in kansas. So the 'majority' living in Missouri is true, but a 40-60 ratio and closing with the current growth rates.

Kansas City, Kansas is home to a Nascar race track. Not only that, but I admitted that the other pro sports are in mizzou, but the sports teams are KC based teams. They are intended for all of kc, not just the mizzou-side. Let's not get into the overly smart-ass technicalities, you knew exactly what I was talking about.
Hey, us South Dakotans are tickled to have the Black Hills considered a mountain range. In the old days it's true that 1000' base to point was the original definition. You can find newer definitions as now being 2000'+ to be a mountain and others state that there isn't an official height to determine the difference. Google your heart out.

It's all in an individuals perception. I was merely stating that I like that your perception is that it's a mountain range. Other than the southern hills in the area I mentioned, the "hills" are covered with trees over all the top points. Thus, my perception. Totally different appearance to the mountain ranges farther west.

The Black Hills and the Badlands definitely are something totally unique from Nebraska and Kansas.
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Old 03-22-2015, 02:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgg View Post
Hey, us South Dakotans are tickled to have the Black Hills considered a mountain range. In the old days it's true that 1000' base to point was the original definition. You can find newer definitions as now being 2000'+ to be a mountain and others state that there isn't an official height to determine the difference. Google your heart out.

It's all in an individuals perception. I was merely stating that I like that your perception is that it's a mountain range. Other than the southern hills in the area I mentioned, the "hills" are covered with trees over all the top points. Thus, my perception. Totally different appearance to the mountain ranges farther west.

The Black Hills and the Badlands definitely are something totally unique from Nebraska and Kansas.
I agree. South Dakota and Nebraska have contrasting terrain types from each other. South Dakota has the hills/mountains and the badlands, Nebraska has the rare sandhills, buttes, mesas and a badland-like area which includes toadstool. They are different from each other which is good. It provides variety and it's a very good variety. That is why if I had to choose, Nebraska is more like SD than KS. Nebraska is quite loaded with great scenery and is full of variety. Kansas just doesn't fit that mold. I'm not saying it is ugly or completely flat, it just isn't like our two states.
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