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Old 04-13-2007, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Omaha
48 posts, read 165,678 times
Reputation: 21

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The weekly US gasoline inventory report was scary to say the least. I saw that the EIA stated that while it is not a time to panic, it will be if imports don't start flowing into the US soon.
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Quote:
Gasoline Contracts Spring Up
Shortage Concerns Ahead of Summer Drive Sharp Gains
By MASOOD FARIVAR

April 13, 2007

"It's too early to panic," said Doug MacIntyre, an analyst at the Energy Information Administration, the Department of Energy's statistics and analysis arm. "There is plenty of time to rebuild inventories, but it depends on when imports start increasing again."

Since late January, gasoline futures have soared 60% as stockpiles of gasoline have slumped by more than 27 million barrels, nearly three times their seasonal rate of decline.

Refiners, wholesalers, and terminal operators keep a certain amount of inventory on hand. To give refiners a cushion against a supply snag during the peak driving season of summer, gasoline inventories -- currently at about 200 million barrels and below their historic range -- need to climb to about 210 million barrels by mid-May and to between 213 million and 214 million barrels by the end of the month, Mr. MacIntyre said.

http://online.wsj.com/page/commodities.html?mod=2_0030
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As it appears, US gasonline demand now permanently has exceeded supply and there hasn't been any more import contracts as of yet. Europe is having problems themselves refining and meeting their demand which is why there is a shortfall in exports this year. Maybe this is the time for the EIA to now say "now is the time to panic!"
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Old 04-13-2007, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Omaha
48 posts, read 165,678 times
Reputation: 21
Check this out. Another reason ethanol would never work as a substitute.

Prices on everything from cereal and milk to soft drinks and red meat are on the upswing, due partly to the ethanol and biodiesel boom which is pushing up prices for corn and other commodities. High energy prices also remain troublesome, regardless whether gas tops $3 a gallon, and clothing costs are up this year too.

http://www.time.com/time/business/ar...rss-topstories
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Old 04-13-2007, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Omaha
48 posts, read 165,678 times
Reputation: 21
This is the reason why large suburbs and cities will have to cope for change. It will be even rough for Omaha/Lincoln metropolitan area. In my opinion as well as the experts, Lincoln and Omaha will never become a metropolitan area due to the seriousness of what is coming.
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Author warns of oil catastrophe
An award-winning investigative journalist who was born in Sudbury is warning that the world faces a terrifying energy crisis as its oil supplies run out.

http://www.sudburytoday.co.uk/ViewAr...icleID=2698443
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Life in the big city is about to change and I hope the best for everyone.
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Old 04-13-2007, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska (moving to Ohio)
673 posts, read 3,950,579 times
Reputation: 480
All the more reason why Omaha should work on being more of a subtainable city. That means increasing funding for transit, light-rail and a dense high-rise corridor. Omaha also is a unique position to have community gardens and farms because Omaha has so many neighborhoods that have empty lots.

Omaha should really work on something similar to a light-rail corridor with high density devolopment.

Many cities have been very aggressive devolopment that is situated in proximity to transit and many urban amenities.

Omaha has a very weak reputation on urban devolopment thats sustainable in the long-term but they are getting better with densifying the eastern area of the city.

I think alot of cities like Atlanta, Oklahoma City Houston and Phoenix
will be at a big disadvantage with the higher gasoline prices compared to cities in Ohio and on the east coast where people drive much less because sprawl is not nearly as extensive.
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Old 04-13-2007, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,351 posts, read 115,012,342 times
Reputation: 35920
MattDen:
Quote:
I think alot of cities like Atlanta, Oklahoma City Houston and Phoenix
will be at a big disadvantage with the higher gasoline prices compared to cities in Ohio and on the east coast where people drive much less because sprawl is not nearly as extensive.
Except for NYC, and perhaps Boston, most people drive everywhere in the east as well, especially for personal use. While there is some transit use for work, freeways are crowded everywhere. DC has one of the worst sprawl situations in the country. Chicago is a midwestern city where there is a fair amount of public transit use.
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Old 04-13-2007, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Omaha
48 posts, read 165,678 times
Reputation: 21
Again you are missing the problem. We are too late when it comes to mitigation. We should have done this decades ago. Your asking for changes that takes decades to do while we have more and more people to feed, clothe, and work in a never ending growing sprawl that our cities have developed. Its too late.
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Old 04-13-2007, 10:39 PM
 
Location: West Omaha
1,181 posts, read 3,861,262 times
Reputation: 505
Cordor,

How do you know its too late?? Does past history suggest that when converting from an oil based economy to a hydrogen based economy you need at least X amount of time?? There is NO historical precedence here! I'm not going to go through your 5 messages that you posted and respond to them all. I've been going back and forth with another member on this issue and am pretty tired of it for right now.
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Old 04-14-2007, 12:15 AM
 
Location: Omaha
48 posts, read 165,678 times
Reputation: 21
I am not saying its the end of the world. What I am saying is its too late to transition to another source without the chaos that will come about thru powering down to a more sustainable condition. I don't mean to come on here as a lunatic holding a picket sign saying "the end is nigh". I am only trying to get across to people that the comfortable and easy transition is long gone and that we will experience events like wars and depression while many may have to suffer and make sacrifices. It appears already that the energy wars are just starting and other third nations are experiencing hunger and terrorism at an exponential level. Do you think that for one minute those chinese farmers that are just experiencing the comfortable lifestyles want to give that up now and go back to farming? Many third world nations are already experiencing problems due to energy pricing issues. The twentieth century provided us with cheap energy and allowed the planet to feed and house many people over what the planet can sustain. What made this possible? Cheap energy made it possible. Transportation, Fertilizers, products and byproducts have made urban sprawl and the earths carryload to be more than what was intended for. Why if you look at the statistics from 1890 to today you see that the population of the world was under one billion to now six fold. Never in earths history has there been this many people living on the planet. Also more people today that are alive outnumber all that have died in earths history. I can provide a link if anybody is interested. That my friend is all I have to say.
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Old 05-13-2007, 03:09 AM
 
Location: New Mexico to Nebraska
25 posts, read 83,139 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattDen View Post
All the more reason why Omaha should work on being more of a subtainable city. That means increasing funding for transit, light-rail and a dense high-rise corridor. Omaha also is a unique position to have community gardens and farms because Omaha has so many neighborhoods that have empty lots.

Omaha should really work on something similar to a light-rail corridor with high density devolopment.

Many cities have been very aggressive devolopment that is situated in proximity to transit and many urban amenities.

Omaha has a very weak reputation on urban devolopment thats sustainable in the long-term but they are getting better with densifying the eastern area of the city.

I think alot of cities like Atlanta, Oklahoma City Houston and Phoenix
will be at a big disadvantage with the higher gasoline prices compared to cities in Ohio and on the east coast where people drive much less because sprawl is not nearly as extensive.
No offense, dude, but it's obvious you've never BEEN to the East Coast. NO SPRAWL ARE YOU KIDDING?! Portland, Maine all the way down to say, northern Virginia is the very definition of sprawl! I once drove 5 from Boston to DC, and had NO idea when New York began and ended.

Don't get me wrong, I love these places, but it's hardly sprawl-less (if that's a word).
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Old 05-13-2007, 10:10 AM
 
Location: MSP
553 posts, read 1,238,557 times
Reputation: 463
Poulson, you need to do your homework if you think we are going to have a hydrogen economy! The fact that it takes more energy to produce it than it gives when you burn it is one problem. Hydorgen is not like oil! Oil already has energy in it and can be stored. Hydrogen is like electricity and needs oil or some other form of energy to create and also requires a considerable amount of energy to be stored. especially if you dont want your car to blow up and kill everyone on the street near it!
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