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New Jersey Suburbs of Philadelphia Burlington County, Camden County, Gloucester County, Salem County in South Jersey
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Old 06-12-2012, 09:36 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
9,371 posts, read 13,038,838 times
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I spend a decent amount of time in South Jersey. Living at the edge of University City, I generally head to the Jersey side of the River after work/school when I need to do shopping/errands. The traffic flows better in your neck of the woods, and Cherry Hill is just so much closer to we're I currently live than Plymouth Meeting or King of Prussia. On the weekends, I often head down to Margate. Until very recently, however, I had never really explored the charming inner suburbs that span between Camden and Cherry Hill. I have to say that I'm incredibly impressed with Haddonfield. I had visited before, but never really got a chance to explore and soak it all in. For a town of just over 11,000, there's an absolutely amazing array of shops and restaurants, bucolic parks and green spaces, and an extraordinary housing stock that rivals the Eastern Main Line. Haddonfield really does feel like a shrunken version of Lower Merion; I particularly see strong elements of Ardmore and Bryn Mawr toward the core (along with Narberth). Areas further out boast a Penn Valley-like feel, with a hint of Gladwyne evident around Tavistock Country Club. I took a date there the other night, and the girl, a Minnesota native who had never been across the border, was not only shocked that New Jersey consisted of more than decaying cites and toxic waste dumps, but was able to count Haddonfield among the nicest towns she had ever visited.

It would be pretty amazing to get a job at Archer Greiner and be able to walk to work every day. Indeed, if I end up there, or at any good Philly branch office across the Delaware, I would live in Haddonfield in a heartbeat.
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Old 06-12-2012, 11:28 AM
 
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I have lived in HF for 10 years and can attest that it is a great place to live, work and raise a family. The schools and particularly the high school are excellent and the reason why many move here.

Historic homes, a bustling downtown with real shops and restaurants (local and chain) that people use everyday, plus the PATCO speedline to Philly. Everything within walking distance including all the schools (no busing) was the reason we moved here.
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Old 06-12-2012, 01:19 PM
 
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Haddonfield is gorgeous and a wonderful place to live, if only one can afford it. It was the original "real" town in the area before the suburban post-war explosion. I was part of the explosion- a baby-boomer with a veteran father who moved from the city to the Outback of now-Cherry Hill in the 1950s.
I just spent two weeks in the area (father in Cherry Hill, sister in Mt. Laurel) and was horrified by the congestion and six-lane highways wall-to-wall with commerce and strip malls and chain stores, with these leafy subdivisions and condo complexes in between. I think I'd go mad if I had to drive there every day. When I crossed back into New England, I noticed I could change lanes without having a near-death experience. My home in metro Boston off the interstate felt like a hamlet.
On the other hand, I ate at Ponzio's, where I used to work as a kid. Enjoyed the sight of all kinds of people enjoying the parkland along Cooper River near Rt.70.
There is no concentrated nightlife, but you can drive (and drive. and drive.) to individual restaurants or bars and there are plenty of them.
Oh. I forgot about the wall-to-wall traffic on Friday afternoon on Rt.42 headed for the shore. There are *a lot* of people living in the area!
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:42 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
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Haddonfield is a wonderful town.. You ought to see it during Christmas time. Amazing
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Old 06-13-2012, 08:08 AM
 
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Yes, isn't it great that we have such a beautiful town just outside one of the most dangerous, poorest places in the country? You can drive from Camden to Haddonfield in just a few minutes, and the contrast is shocking. The rich people live in Haddonfield and their taxes stay in Haddonfield. Yes, I am aware of equalization payments resulting from the Mt. Laurel decision, but even if that is the case, it would be Haddonfield's own fault for failing to develop any affordable housing, though I can see why people would be against it with such a large population of the permanent underclass nearby. The Mt. Laurel decision is flawed anyway, because with such small boroughs and towns scattered throughout NJ it's silly to require each and every one of them to develop affordable housing when it would be completely out of character with the existing development in those towns. I say abolish all the individual towns/cities in Camden County and make one regional Camden government which is responsible for everything including schools. There is no reason for such inequity within the same county. It's all really one contiguous urban area anyway, and the taxes should be placed into the same pot. There would also be less opportunity for corruption with one highly visible regional government vs. dozens of small towns. Kids from Camden should have access to schools of the same caliber as Haddonfield's. Until then, I cannot enjoy Haddonfield's bucolic nature knowing of the travesty located just down the street in Camden. I think any foreign visitor to the U.S. should be availed of a tour - drive right through Camden then straight into Haddonfield to show them the "two Americas" - the haves (privileged) and have nots (screwed over by our government).
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Old 06-13-2012, 08:31 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
9,371 posts, read 13,038,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tarp View Post
Yes, isn't it great that we have such a beautiful town just outside one of the most dangerous, poorest places in the country? You can drive from Camden to Haddonfield in just a few minutes, and the contrast is shocking. The rich people live in Haddonfield and their taxes stay in Haddonfield. Yes, I am aware of equalization payments resulting from the Mt. Laurel decision, but even if that is the case, it would be Haddonfield's own fault for failing to develop any affordable housing, though I can see why people would be against it with such a large population of the permanent underclass nearby. The Mt. Laurel decision is flawed anyway, because with such small boroughs and towns scattered throughout NJ it's silly to require each and every one of them to develop affordable housing when it would be completely out of character with the existing development in those towns. I say abolish all the individual towns/cities in Camden County and make one regional Camden government which is responsible for everything including schools. There is no reason for such inequity within the same county. It's all really one contiguous urban area anyway, and the taxes should be placed into the same pot. There would also be less opportunity for corruption with one highly visible regional government vs. dozens of small towns. Kids from Camden should have access to schools of the same caliber as Haddonfield's. Until then, I cannot enjoy Haddonfield's bucolic nature knowing of the travesty located just down the street in Camden. I think any foreign visitor to the U.S. should be availed of a tour - drive right through Camden then straight into Haddonfield to show them the "two Americas" - the haves (privileged) and have nots (screwed over by our government).
A good solution to the school problem would be to pool all property tax revenue up to a certain millage rate and then redistribute it on an equitable basis. If elite school districts want to raise taxes above that minimum so as to maintain the high status quo, that would be their prerogative. There will never be complete school district equality, but at the very least, we can turn the "acceptable minimum" into something that's actually acceptable. A similar proposal is actually on the table in Pennsylvania (although the PA plan would replace property tax funding with sales tax funding). That said, I appreciate you using this thread as an opportunity to stand on your soapbox. I hope you now feel good about yourself.
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Old 06-13-2012, 08:50 AM
 
1,726 posts, read 5,866,598 times
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Isn't that what these forums are for - for stimulating discussion?
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Old 06-13-2012, 08:55 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
9,371 posts, read 13,038,838 times
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Originally Posted by tarp View Post
Isn't that what these forums are for - for stimulating discussion?
When they're cogent to the discussion at hand, most definitely.
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Old 06-13-2012, 09:05 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,814 posts, read 34,735,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
A good solution to the school problem would be to pool all property tax revenue up to a certain millage rate and then redistribute it on an equitable basis. If elite school districts want to raise taxes above that minimum so as to maintain the high status quo, that would be their prerogative. There will never be complete school district equality, but at the very least, we can turn the "acceptable minimum" into something that's actually acceptable. A similar proposal is actually on the table in Pennsylvania (although the PA plan would replace property tax funding with sales tax funding). That said, I appreciate you using this thread as an opportunity to stand on your soapbox. I hope you now feel good about yourself.
Taxes are & have been redistributed. It's called the Abbott Districts.
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Old 06-13-2012, 09:07 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
9,371 posts, read 13,038,838 times
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Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Taxes are & have been redistributed. It's called the Abbott Districts.
Clearly they aren't redistributing enough.
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