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New Jersey Suburbs of Philadelphia Burlington County, Camden County, Gloucester County, Salem County in South Jersey
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Old 05-18-2020, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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We've been over that. A couple of years ago I saw a real estate listing for a nineteenth century Victorian on ten acres in the Repaupo area. The ten acres was all that was left of what had once been a much larger farm, estate. If few people are selling, not much is going to be built.
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Old 05-19-2020, 09:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Hudlander View Post
So basically, South Jersey is so relatively undeveloped, between the NJTP and GSP, in spite of its proximity to a major city because of a) the Pine Barrens wetland soils and b) North Jersey using those development credits?
I don't think that fully explains it, because if you go to Salem county like Carneys Point, Pennsville, etc it's like you stepped back into time. There is absolutely nothing there since Dupont closed. Some thriving farms but really very little development and they are not in the pine lands.There's just no jobs nearby. There are also strict rules about what you can do with farmland. You can get a home with farmland with great tax breaks but you have to grow something. A lot of people agree to grow hay because it's cheap and easy and you don't need much knowledge. But they get a cheap house and land.
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Old 05-21-2020, 08:40 AM
 
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I don't think that fully explains it, because if you go to Salem county like Carneys Point, Pennsville, etc it's like you stepped back into time. There is absolutely nothing there since Dupont closed. Some thriving farms but really very little development and they are not in the pine lands.There's just no jobs nearby. There are also strict rules about what you can do with farmland. You can get a home with farmland with great tax breaks but you have to grow something. A lot of people agree to grow hay because it's cheap and easy and you don't need much knowledge. But they get a cheap house and land.
Hmm, so it's more a function then of the relative decline or lack of growth in greater Philly post WWII?
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Old 05-21-2020, 08:49 AM
 
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Hmm, so it's more a function then of the relative decline or lack of growth in greater Philly post WWII?
I don’t think they were ever really dependent on Philly. Those areas are much closer to Delaware than Philly. The Dupont factory employed thousands and thousands of people in that area but there were other factories too. I think between the factories closing, and farming becoming less profitable, people who were able to leave left and demand for housing and development dried up.
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Old 05-22-2020, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Central New Jersey (prev. Boston, NY, Florida)
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South and Central Jersey Undeveloped? I think its rather overdeveloped.
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Old 05-23-2020, 07:56 AM
 
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South and Central Jersey Undeveloped? I think its rather overdeveloped.



It depends greatly where you are. Much of Camden County and parts of Gloucester county are overdeveloped but there is a lot of open space in Burlington, Gloucester, Cumberland, Atlantic, Salem counties. Crowded areas too but a lot of open space and farmland. I’ve had hour commutes where I’ve taken back roads and can count on one hand the number of cars on the road (like my commute from southern Gloucester County to Carney’s Point). Unfortunately no bathrooms on the way with the back roads!

Once going to a doctors appointment in Forked River, I found a back way that dropped me onto the GSP all the almost way up to where I needed to go. But until I got to that point, 40 minutes or so of my drive was a lovely and serene drive through the Pinelands and Batso.

That’s one of the things I love about far south Jersey, there are usually multiple back ways to get most anywhere.
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Old 07-16-2020, 03:56 PM
 
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I'm starting to think the reason S Jersey is so relatively undeveloped is because of the lack of growth/the decline of Philly post WW II mores than anything else.

If Philly had been thriving like metro NY, BOS, or WAS, the development pressure would have overwhelmed any preservation efforts in South Jersey; but given the lack of growth in Philly, expansion was easier and able to be absorbed by the already more developed areas on the other side of Delaware.
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Old 07-16-2020, 04:06 PM
 
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I'm starting to think the reason S Jersey is so relatively undeveloped is because of the lack of growth/the decline of Philly post WW II mores than anything else.

If Philly had been thriving like metro NY, BOS, or WAS, the development pressure would have overwhelmed any preservation efforts in South Jersey; but given the lack of growth in Philly, expansion was easier and able to be absorbed by the already more developed areas on the other side of Delaware.
But it is very developed in all the towns close to Philly, Cherry Hill, maple shade, Voorhees, even as far as Washington Twp. There’s so many houses in so much traffic there I don’t think they could grow any more at all. It’s farther south where it’s still undeveloped. Southern Williamstown, Hammonton etc. and south. It’s far to commute to Philly from there. It’s closer to commute to the shore from these areas. But there aren’t as many jobs due to that, and it’s lower income (Until you get to the shore towns themselves) and the schools aren’t as good as in Cherry Hill, Haddonfield etc.
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Old 07-17-2020, 07:34 AM
 
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But it is very developed in all the towns close to Philly, Cherry Hill, maple shade, Voorhees, even as far as Washington Twp. There’s so many houses in so much traffic there I don’t think they could grow any more at all. It’s farther south where it’s still undeveloped. Southern Williamstown, Hammonton etc. and south. It’s far to commute to Philly from there. It’s closer to commute to the shore from these areas. But there aren’t as many jobs due to that, and it’s lower income (Until you get to the shore towns themselves) and the schools aren’t as good as in Cherry Hill, Haddonfield etc.
It's not developed beyond a few 'sun spots' like that. You have other areas within 15, 20, 30 miles of center city that aren't developed; that is unheard of in METRO DC or NY and it always fascinates me that a top 10 market like Philly has this land vacancy. I now am starting to think it is due to a lack of growth demand reflective of the general decline of Philly.
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Old 07-17-2020, 07:42 AM
 
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It's not developed beyond a few 'sun spots' like that. You have other areas within 15, 20, 30 miles of center city that aren't developed; that is unheard of in METRO DC or NY and it always fascinates me that a top 10 market like Philly has this land vacancy. I now am starting to think it is due to a lack of growth demand reflective of the general decline of Philly.
What areas that close to Philly are still undeveloped?
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