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Old 05-07-2012, 04:08 AM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,380 posts, read 26,886,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonathan90 View Post
hundreds and thousands of kangaroos and boars are shot for there meet and if its not the aussies who shoot them its the native aboriginals who spear them.
They Farm Kangaroos and Boars that are sold in markets , and the Aborignals don't kill animals for fun or that many...
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Old 05-07-2012, 04:13 AM
 
Location: melbourne australia
32 posts, read 62,982 times
Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
They Farm Kangaroos and Boars that are sold in markets , and the Aborignals don't kill animals for fun or that many...
mate I have to take you to australia and I will show you for yourself aborigines do kill wild boar I is know that im australian.
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Old 05-07-2012, 04:19 AM
 
1,463 posts, read 3,270,634 times
Reputation: 2828
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny come lately View Post
How do people here feel about the fact that we are killing our bears, and it is a State Mandate.
Are you talking about the Black Bear? Brown Bear? Grizzly? Why would anyone want to kill a bear unless they are being threatened by one? I use to live in Maine and there were Black Bear up there in abundance at times and never, not ever was there a State law that they be shot on site. It seems rather cruel if the bear is not harming anyone. Strange law.
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Old 05-07-2012, 04:25 AM
 
20,948 posts, read 19,078,247 times
Reputation: 10270
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevemorse View Post
thank God its over. I feel like its terrible. I live with the bears, they walk right down my street. This year I did not see anymore infact I actually saw less. I think its wrong, am totally against bear killing, there are better solutions. I would never be friends withsomeone who participes in this or want to know them. Marilyn
Yea. Bears are beautiful animals.

The problem is when they're gnawing on your head.

Would you be against killing a bear that was gnawing on your head?
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Old 05-07-2012, 04:29 AM
 
Location: melbourne australia
32 posts, read 62,982 times
Reputation: 34
I patted a wild possum once and it scratched the crap out of me.
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Old 05-07-2012, 06:40 AM
 
11,337 posts, read 11,065,447 times
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It is logical in population centers of humans to not permit encroachment by bears or any other animals that become pests due to excessive population. The country is large enough that areas far from population centers can and have been segregated as national parks and refuges. Many other areas are naturally remote and there is no clash between human and animal life.

However, in population centers, such as northern NJ, it would be irrational to allow bears, deer, raccoons, geese, or anything else to populate to the point of being a danger or nuisance to humans.

In such cases it is rational to kill off the offending species to reduce its population to manageable levels. Rights do not apply to animals, only humans, so any animal "rights" argument is inherently irrational.

Therefore, the killing of excess bears, is moral, rational, and correct. Frankly, there should be no bears at all in human population centers.
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Old 05-07-2012, 07:03 AM
 
Location: NJ
23,602 posts, read 17,287,157 times
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Can't say anyone shoots bears for "fun".

Bears were vermin in Maine until maybe the 70s or early 80s. were not protected by law, as are some birds like starlings and red squirrels, unless that got changed, in NJ.

Up until 1972 or 3, at least one bear was harvested during the hunting season usuallly in sussex co. then no bear hunting until recently. Apparently since the early 70s the bear pop in Nj has exploded.

Fear the chichahua running loose in your neighborhood but not a 300 lb black bear who is stressed and unpredictable.

Just as humans, animals are individuals with unique personalities. Just answer this question, Are all people who live in NJ, friendly and think the same?

the same conclusion applies to black bears, squirrels and box turtles, etc.
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Old 05-07-2012, 10:45 AM
 
Location: NJ
31,771 posts, read 40,781,199 times
Reputation: 24590
Quote:
Originally Posted by chennai01 View Post
Killing more bears without addressing the garbage issue doesn't solve the problem.
hahahahaaha "the garbage issue." as if we should stop putting our garbage out because of the bears. bears are animals, we are humans; we can kill them if we want to.
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Old 05-07-2012, 12:29 PM
 
76 posts, read 174,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Paolella View Post
It is logical in population centers of humans to not permit encroachment by bears or any other animals that become pests due to excessive population. The country is large enough that areas far from population centers can and have been segregated as national parks and refuges. Many other areas are naturally remote and there is no clash between human and animal life.

However, in population centers, such as northern NJ, it would be irrational to allow bears, deer, raccoons, geese, or anything else to populate to the point of being a danger or nuisance to humans.

In such cases it is rational to kill off the offending species to reduce its population to manageable levels. Rights do not apply to animals, only humans, so any animal "rights" argument is inherently irrational.

Therefore, the killing of excess bears, is moral, rational, and correct. Frankly, there should be no bears at all in human population centers.
Truly wild places where populations and wildlife do not interact are virtually non-existant. Based on your recommendation, we would relegate wildlife into tiny enclaves in such few numbers where genetic viability is non-existant.

Bears will never permanently reside in urban or highly developed suburban areas due to lack of habitat. Yes, some young bears dispersing from their mothers may wander in during spring searching for a new territory and will either leave on their own or can be relocated (or euthanized if deemed aggressive).

The main areas where bears are issues are developments bordering on prime bear habitat. Strict enforcement of rules mandating use of bear proof garbage containers would address the main issue why bears are in these areas - easy access to dense sources of calories exceeding natural foods.

This is not an issue of animal rights and that issue is not as black and white as you claim. We as a society have certain ethical standards - animal control does not shoot stray dogs on site, snares are banned in most places due to cruelty, poisoning of carcasses is prohibited, etc. Under your logic of "humans > animals" , all these actions would be allowable.

New Jersey is a progressive state and people like to know wildlife exists. Frankly, I'd rather live in a state where people look for innovative solutions than to simply kill anything that is a "nuiscance." That being said, problem bears that cannot be effectively deterred from causing problems should be lethally removed. However, eradicating all the bears (and deer and geese) is not the solution and is an outdated 1800s model of "managing wildlife."

Black bears generally are easy predators to get along with provided simple steps are taken. How can we ask poor rural people in southeast Asia to preserve the last remaining tigers, black rhinos, etc, which are very much a significant threat to humans, when we cannot get along with a species that is generally non-aggressive to people?

New Jersey should be on the leading edge promoting co-existance of humans and bears in northwest New Jersey. Innovative programs developed by world renowned bear biologists, which have had tremendous success, should be conducted in New Jersey. For example:

The Get Bear Smart Society (GBS)* is a registered Canadian charity that works hard to ensure people and bears safely and respectfully coexist wherever their homes and home ranges overlap.
Our staff, board and supporters champion progressive management policies and human behaviours that reduce human-bear conflicts. This inevitably improves public safety, limits property damage and reduces the number of bears that needlessly die each year as a result of these preventable conflicts.
We accomplish our mission by:
  • educating people about how to prevent human-bear conflicts in and around their homes, neighbourhoods and communities;
  • helping policymakers find cost-effective solutions to the challenges of creating Bear Smart communities, including the implementation of effective conflict management policies and regulations and bear-proof waste management systems;
  • and promoting innovative and practical non-lethal bear management practices.
Although our work informs and influences bear management practices and policies across North America, we focus much of our time and energy on the resort community of Whistler, BC, where we are based. The improvements achieved over the years as part of our BearSmart Whistler Program illustrate what can be accomplished by implementing Bear Smart policies and practices.

As a result of Get Bear Smart programs, the number of conflict bears that have been killed has been reduced by more than 50 per cent over the last decade — despite the fact the number of human-bear interactions has increased four-fold. This makes Whistler a leader in the ongoing attempt to establish a truly Bear Smart community that can act as a model for other communities to follow.

Together, we can create a paradigm shift in people's attitudes toward bears and other wildlife by replacing fear and ignorance with understanding and respect.

About Us | www.bearsmart.com
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Old 05-07-2012, 02:04 PM
 
2,535 posts, read 6,677,890 times
Reputation: 1603
LOL. Whistler's closest city is Vancouver and that is 2 hours away...it's in the middle of NOWHERE. If you go 2 hours away from NYC, in Northwest New Jersey, do you know where you are? I do, and it's called Pennsylvania. Sell your bear smarts there...or at least on that forum.
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