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Old 05-24-2011, 06:44 PM
 
Location: PA
71 posts, read 627,869 times
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My family is from New Jersey/Pennsylvania area and I am moving back to that area in July. I have heard it's impossible to get a teaching job in PA so I started looking at job listings in NJ. I was surprised they even have some listed after hearing about how tough things have gotten for teachers in NJ lately. What I am wondering... how difficult are they to get? Are they really hiring new people or are most of these positions already filled but they have to do a certain amount of interviews by law? Are there areas that are really in need of teachers?

I have an elementary education degree and 2 years experience teaching in an elementary school. For the last 2 years, I have been working at a day care unable to get a public school teaching job where I currently live.

I would like to stay close to the border of PA, but am willing to drive a little if it means getting a job.

Any input would be appreciated! Thanks!
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Old 05-24-2011, 06:52 PM
 
1,357 posts, read 2,939,245 times
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It is astonishingly difficult, especially in a saturated field like elementary education. A lot of schools have a whole bunch of degreed, certified aides and assistants who are also going crazy trying to find full-time positions. (There are about 8 in my elementary school, some of whom have been there three years, and I'm in an urban district.) You're going to have to apply anywhere and everywhere, and dedicate some time to the cause. Good luck!
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Old 05-25-2011, 04:10 AM
 
36,876 posts, read 24,935,491 times
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My niece started out as a sub in the district she wanted to teach in after graduating, then became a long-term sub for a teacher with an extended illness...then when the district hired/replaced teachers, she had to apply like anyone else, but already had a good reputation and a huge leg up in the process because they already knew her and knew she was a good teacher. It is hard especially elementary - if you get a special ed cert you will have a huge advantage.
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Old 05-25-2011, 06:00 AM
 
1,527 posts, read 3,846,044 times
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Nothing is impossible, but it's near impossible. I know in our district, they get hundreds of applications for each elementary opening.
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Old 05-25-2011, 02:46 PM
 
Location: NJ
22 posts, read 78,410 times
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Default Obtain more than one certification

Do you have credits to get certified in a subject area? If you can get certified in Science, Math, or Special Education on top of your Elem. Ed. certification, that will help. There are so many teachers that are retiring nowadays. Also, subbing will definitely get your foot in the door and allow you to make some connections. I have both my Elem. Ed and Middle School Science certification and have been teaching for 4 years. Having the Science certification really helped.
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Old 05-25-2011, 03:18 PM
 
36,876 posts, read 24,935,491 times
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That's not true, my niece didn't know anyone. She started as a sub to get the chance to know people and show her skills in the classroom. I feel your post is insulting to her and she doesn't deserve to be looked down on for a job she does very well and got due to her initiative and skills, not her connections.
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Old 05-25-2011, 03:44 PM
 
Location: NJ
22 posts, read 78,410 times
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I didn't know anyone in the district for which I work. I am not even originally from NJ but but by subbing, you do get to know people in a way that they see your capabilities and love for teaching. Also, I wasn't a member of any union as a substitute teacher and as far as I know, the union doesn't have anything to do with you being hired in any school district. However, that being said, of course, as in any job setting, people get hired based on who they know. In our school, I have seen it work both ways. However, once hired, if you don't perform well as a teacher you won't get tenure (no matter who you know).
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Old 05-25-2011, 05:48 PM
 
Location: PA
71 posts, read 627,869 times
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Thanks for your replies! Though none make me very hopeful... I plan on subbing if I can't find any long term positions, I guess I just have to decide what districts would be best as far as getting a job more quickly, and not subbing for years and years.

Unfortunately, I do not know anyone in any school districts in NJ and have heard that is the only way you can get a job. Of all my friends who also graduated with a teaching degree, only the ones with friends and family in the districts got jobs right away. Others are still subbing 4 years later.

I do have a teaching license for Middle School Math in Pennsylvania (but just have never applied for one in NJ though I meet the requirements). I do not want to teach middle school math though, do you think it might help get an elementary school teaching job just because I have it?

Anyone know which districts are the hardest and/or easiest to get into?

Thanks for your help!
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Old 05-25-2011, 06:08 PM
 
36,876 posts, read 24,935,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QuartB View Post
Thanks for your replies! Though none make me very hopeful... I plan on subbing if I can't find any long term positions, I guess I just have to decide what districts would be best as far as getting a job more quickly, and not subbing for years and years.

Unfortunately, I do not know anyone in any school districts in NJ and have heard that is the only way you can get a job. Of all my friends who also graduated with a teaching degree, only the ones with friends and family in the districts got jobs right away. Others are still subbing 4 years later.

I do have a teaching license for Middle School Math in Pennsylvania (but just have never applied for one in NJ though I meet the requirements). I do not want to teach middle school math though, do you think it might help get an elementary school teaching job just because I have it?

Anyone know which districts are the hardest and/or easiest to get into?

Thanks for your help!
Part of the problem is that the vast majority of grads want to teach elementary grades. When I worked for Galloway Twp schools several years back (as a therapist, not a teacher) I started with a job fair they held (I guess they ran out of relatives and friends to hire and thus had to resort to hiring total strangers ). They were calling people from a podium for different areas of need (science, math, etc) and hardly anyone was raising their hand - finally they asked "Is there anyone here who is NOT K-6?" and out of a couple hundred people, maybe a dozen raised their hand. The more you have to separate yourself from the crowd, the better. Even of you don't love middle school or math, once you get into a district it's much easier to get into an open spot when one opens in an area you do want to teach.

ESL, math, science, and especially special ed are all valuable to have, so if you can get that math cert in NJ, go for it.
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Old 05-25-2011, 06:36 PM
 
4,181 posts, read 9,889,714 times
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Please do not discuss politics within this topic.


Unfortunately NJ is very hard to get a teaching job in at the moment. I know a lot of people from college who went to school to become teachers and most have still not found a typical teaching job in a public school.

Unfortunately, most are still involved in day care, subbing, or catholic school. I do know two people who got jobs working in NY though (one in NYC, one in Newburgh, NY). Both are difficult areas to work in, but it is a job. NJ seems to be a tough nut to crack right now though.
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