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Old 12-10-2011, 07:16 AM
 
238 posts, read 1,506,258 times
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NEW YORK (AP) — A rank-and-file policeman at the George Washington Bridge has made more than $200,000 so far this year, along with dozens of other police officers for the agency that patrols New York City's airports, the tunnels under the Hudson River and the new World Trade Center site.
Payroll figures and names released for the first time Friday by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey show 66 police officers have made more than $200,000 so far in 2011, thanks to overtime that in many cases has doubled their salaries.
The bridge patrolman made $221,706. A sergeant on a special-operations team pulled in $265,059. That puts him far above executives like Aviation Director Susan Baer, who oversees three of the world's busiest airports — JFK, LaGuardia and Newark — and two other airports. She's made $237,971 so far this year.
The Port Authority Police Benevolent Association, the union that represents most of the police, says the high overtime numbers are the agency's own fault. President Paul Nunziato said the union has been asking the Port Authority for years to hire more officers.
"To me, it's absurd, and I've told them it's absurd," Nunziato said. "It's cheaper to hire another guy and pay his benefits than paying someone 2,000 hours or 2,500 hours at time-and-a-half."
Earlier this week, Executive Director Patrick Foye said he hoped the release of payroll figures and names would expose waste.
"What you can measure you can manage," said Foye, who receives a $289,667 yearly salary.
In a statement Friday, the Port Authority said it reviews salaries and overtime costs on an ongoing basis, as well as ways to reduce expenses. It said an ongoing review of its security operations will help determine how best to "deploy resources and patrol facilities." But "new overtime measures" for 2012 will require more "quality-control review," the agency said.
The Port Authority operates New York City's airports, its seaports, a train system, and several bridges and tunnels. It also owns the site of the new World Trade Center.
Its finances came under scrutiny in August when the board approved steep toll increases that outraged many commuters. The agency said it needed to boost its credit-worthiness partly to finish the World Trade Center. But the governors of New York and New Jersey ordered an outside audit.
The Port Authority receives no tax money and funds itself through tolls, rents, surcharges on airline tickets and other fees.
The special-ops sergeant who made $265,059 is the highest paid policeman so far this year. His pay includes $115,394 in overtime. Besides the aviation director's pay, it also outstrips Chief Financial Officer Michael Fabiano's earnings of $257,814.
Another patrol sergeant assigned to the Port Authority Trans Hudson Train system has made $256,000 this year, thanks in part to $133,565 in overtime.
The windfall also extends to rank-and-file police officers, most of whom earn base salaries between $68,000 and $90,000 a year.
The patrolman on the George Washington Bridge boosted his $90,000 salary to $221,000 this year through overtime, differential pay and other compensation, the figures show. Another patrolman has earned $218,950.
Overall, the Public Safety Department and its 1,696 employees accounted for $41.4 million of the $90.4 million the Port Authority has paid out in overtime this year. The Port Authority has 6,777 employees.
The figures released Friday also showed how overtime boosted the salaries of other employees. For example, 24 plumbers earn between $49,000 and $78,000 in base pay, but they collected an average $14,500 on top of that this year. Many toll collectors boosted their base wages of $58,916 to $85,000 or more this year with overtime.
Officers with the New York Police Department have long complained they are poorly paid compared to the Port Authority police and suburban police forces. The NYPD has about 35,000 officers.
"At our current rate of pay, New York City Police officers are still among the lowest paid big city police officers in the nation," said Patrick Lynch, head of the New York City Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, the city's largest police union.
___
Associated Press Writer Colleen Long and AP Researcher Julian Burgess contributed to this report.
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Old 12-10-2011, 11:22 AM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,773 posts, read 18,413,554 times
Reputation: 12005
Wow pretty impressive and that does not include the non taxable looking the other way money.
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Old 12-11-2011, 09:08 AM
 
147 posts, read 390,142 times
Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncguy444 View Post
NEW YORK (AP) — A rank-and-file policeman at the George Washington Bridge has made more than $200,000 so far this year, along with dozens of other police officers for the agency that patrols New York City's airports, the tunnels under the Hudson River and the new World Trade Center site.
Payroll figures and names released for the first time Friday by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey show 66 police officers have made more than $200,000 so far in 2011, thanks to overtime that in many cases has doubled their salaries.
The bridge patrolman made $221,706. A sergeant on a special-operations team pulled in $265,059. That puts him far above executives like Aviation Director Susan Baer, who oversees three of the world's busiest airports — JFK, LaGuardia and Newark — and two other airports. She's made $237,971 so far this year.
The Port Authority Police Benevolent Association, the union that represents most of the police, says the high overtime numbers are the agency's own fault. President Paul Nunziato said the union has been asking the Port Authority for years to hire more officers.
"To me, it's absurd, and I've told them it's absurd," Nunziato said. "It's cheaper to hire another guy and pay his benefits than paying someone 2,000 hours or 2,500 hours at time-and-a-half."
Earlier this week, Executive Director Patrick Foye said he hoped the release of payroll figures and names would expose waste.
"What you can measure you can manage," said Foye, who receives a $289,667 yearly salary....
The Port Authority receives no tax money and funds itself through tolls, rents, surcharges on airline tickets and other fees.
The special-ops sergeant who made $265,059 is the highest paid policeman so far this year. His pay includes $115,394 in overtime. Besides the aviation director's pay, it also outstrips Chief Financial Officer Michael Fabiano's earnings of $257,814.
Another patrol sergeant assigned to the Port Authority Trans Hudson Train system has made $256,000 this year, thanks in part to $133,565 in overtime.
The windfall also extends to rank-and-file police officers, most of whom earn base salaries between $68,000 and $90,000 a year.
The patrolman on the George Washington Bridge boosted his $90,000 salary to $221,000 this year through overtime, differential pay and other compensation, the figures show. Another patrolman has earned $218,950.
Overall, the Public Safety Department and its 1,696 employees accounted for $41.4 million of the $90.4 million the Port Authority has paid out in overtime this year. The Port Authority has 6,777 employees.
The figures released Friday also showed how overtime boosted the salaries of other employees. For example, 24 plumbers earn between $49,000 and $78,000 in base pay, but they collected an average $14,500 on top of that this year. Many toll collectors boosted their base wages of $58,916 to $85,000 or more this year with overtime.
Officers with the New York Police Department have long complained they are poorly paid compared to the Port Authority police and suburban police forces. The NYPD has about 35,000 officers.
"At our current rate of pay, New York City Police officers are still among the lowest paid big city police officers in the nation," said Patrick Lynch, head of the New York City Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, the city's largest police union.
New York City cops and cops most everywhere are not only well paid, but receive extravagant benefits. They also boost their salaries considerably by overtime and under-table kickbacks.
NYC cops make at least $62,500 after 4 years.
Benefits & Salary Overview | NYPDRECRUIT.COM

They also get these benefits:
10 Paid vacation days during first & second year
13 Paid vacation days during third, fourth & fifth year
27 Paid vacation days after 5 years of service
Unlimited sick leave with full pay
A choice of paid medical programs
Prescription, dental, and eyeglass coverage
Annuity fund
Deferred Compensation Plan, 401K and I.R.A.
Optional retirement at one half salary after 22 years of service
Annual $12,000 Variable Supplement Fund (upon retirement)
Annual banking of $12,000 Variable Supplement Fund after 22 years of service (if not retiring)
Excellent promotional opportunities
Educational opportunities

Note that they can retire at half salary after 22 years! So typically they can retire (and take another job if they want) at around age 43. And it's a myth that police work is especially dangerous or that they do much if any good. See BLS data and other evidence at:

https://sites.google.com/site/thepol...eharmthangood/
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Old 12-11-2011, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Epping,NH
2,105 posts, read 6,671,033 times
Reputation: 1089
Wow, if it's that good, why don't you apply.

you also list several benefits that are paid totally by the employee. It's not cheaper to hire another employee and employers know that. why do you think that hiring isn't up. Paying overtime doesn't include person payments (which towns don't pay anyway), not would it include the other benefits. So every year the media drags out the same story of a few that make those high numbers in overtime.

Quote:
66 police officers have made more than $200,000
3.8 percent of the entire department. Wow, great reporting. Some would rather spend every waking hour working. Most don't.

All they do is run the same article and change the numbers. Why not compare pre 9/11 employment vs. today? Most are agencies are down thirty percent from ten years ago. Once again the media slants the story to make a conclusion that fits their needs.

Great reference source. Even the website looks totally amateurish. The benefits you cite were from a contract that ended a year and a half ago. Maybe you weant to live in one of the five borughs on 76K. NYPD tried hiring at 32k a few years back. what thery got were a bunch of l;osers that were involved in more incidents than the vast majority of the others hired under other programs.

Not to mention you cite a NYPD reference for a NJ/NY PA article.Outside of the fact they are both in the same pension system, there are little similarities. Actually your comments are even somewhat childish.

Quote:
The special-ops sergeant who made $265,059 is the highest paid policeman so far this year.
Yet I doubt you have a clue what that unit does. He gets the ot because he is one of a few trained in that specific area. Much of the required training by law has to be done involving ot. But don't let facts get in the way.


My private sector plumber gets a hundred an hour. Looks like those PA plumbers are getting screwed.

Last edited by rscalzo; 12-11-2011 at 10:06 AM..
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Old 12-11-2011, 10:11 AM
 
2,499 posts, read 2,631,616 times
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I make 25% less than I deserve everyone else makes 25% more than they should. My benefits are fair and reasonable your benefits are outrageous.


See how it works.
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Old 12-12-2011, 09:08 AM
 
76 posts, read 243,202 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by rscalzo View Post
Wow, if it's that good, why don't you apply.
Probably because most of us don't want to spend our lives hassling people to make arbitrary quotas. Or they want to do something productive with their lives.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rscalzo View Post
you also list several benefits that are paid totally by the employee. It's not cheaper to hire another employee and employers know that. why do you think that hiring isn't up. Paying overtime doesn't include person payments (which towns don't pay anyway), not would it include the other benefits. So every year the media drags out the same story of a few that make those high numbers in overtime.
Nearly all the benefits are paid for by the taxpayers. And retiring after 22 years is certainly not paid for by the worker.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rscalzo View Post
3.8 percent of the entire department. Wow, great reporting. Some would rather spend every waking hour working. Most don't.

All they do is run the same article and change the numbers. Why not compare pre 9/11 employment vs. today? Most are agencies are down thirty percent from ten years ago. Once again the media slants the story to make a conclusion that fits their needs.
So they change the numbers because they investigated different departments. They all came out the same: Cops make a ton of money and have great benefits. And most of them try to get overtime because it gets them so much more money.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rscalzo View Post
Great reference source. Even the website looks totally amateurish. The benefits you cite were from a contract that ended a year and a half ago. Maybe you weant to live in one of the five borughs on 76K. NYPD tried hiring at 32k a few years back. what thery got were a bunch of l;osers that were involved in more incidents than the vast majority of the others hired under other programs.

Not to mention you cite a NYPD reference for a NJ/NY PA article.Outside of the fact they are both in the same pension system, there are little similarities. Actually your comments are even somewhat childish.
That Web site looks pretty good to me: It lists reliable references for practically every claim it makes. And you're referring to the comments of two posters; your replies look more childish than theirs. You present no hard references or arguments at all, mostly just personal attacks.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rscalzo View Post
Yet I doubt you have a clue what that unit does. He gets the ot because he is one of a few trained in that specific area. Much of the required training by law has to be done involving ot. But don't let facts get in the way.
That does not apply to the OT that cops get after training, which all studies have found boosts their salary often to $150,000 to over $250,000 a year in all the departments investigated.
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Old 12-12-2011, 12:52 PM
 
Location: new jersey, us
201 posts, read 620,214 times
Reputation: 78
What people don't mention this is a hazardous profession? Every day your life is in jeopary and you could be shot at, someone trying to cut you with a knife, run over,...etc. Now if this was Podunk, Nebraska where the crime rate is very low maybe its a different story but its New york. Probably the criminal capital of the US or even the world. somehow I don't mind funding overtime and pensions for people who keeping the streets safe when I go over to nyc to see the many attractions and nightlife.
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Old 12-12-2011, 03:47 PM
 
Location: New Jersey/Florida
5,818 posts, read 12,645,096 times
Reputation: 4414
[SIZE=5]ann_lepore[/SIZE]
Member

Join Date: May 2010
56 posts, read 19,975 times
Reputation: 24



Quote:
Originally Posted by rscalzo
Wow, if it's that good, why don't you apply.

Probably because most of us don't want to spend our lives hassling people

Tell this to the murdered police officer's wife and 4 daughters in NYC. He got shot in the face and killed this morning trying to prevent an armed robbery. Merry Christmas

Last edited by JERSEY MAN; 12-12-2011 at 03:57 PM..
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Old 12-12-2011, 03:52 PM
 
2,535 posts, read 6,677,169 times
Reputation: 1603
Quote:
Originally Posted by subban View Post
What people don't mention this is a hazardous profession? Every day your life is in jeopary and you could be shot at, someone trying to cut you with a knife, run over,...etc. Now if this was Podunk, Nebraska where the crime rate is very low maybe its a different story but its New york. Probably the criminal capital of the US or even the world. somehow I don't mind funding overtime and pensions for people who keeping the streets safe when I go over to nyc to see the many attractions and nightlife.
Seriously, what are people complaining about? If it's such a great deal...do it! It's a public job that is open to all!!!

This sums up my position perfectly:

"I would rather you just said thank you, and went on your way, Otherwise, I suggest you pick up a weapon, and stand a post. Either way, I don't give a damn what you think your entitled to" -Jack N (AFGM)
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Old 12-12-2011, 06:18 PM
 
10,224 posts, read 19,248,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subban View Post
Every day your life is in jeopary and you could be shot at, someone trying to cut you with a knife, run over,...etc.
Same goes for a liquor store clerk in Camden and they get paid minimum wage.
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