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Old 10-05-2012, 05:46 PM
 
Location: NJ
136 posts, read 225,036 times
Reputation: 133

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I moved to a different part of the state, which also has wonderful parks. Perhaps "half" was taken too literally. I just remember huge parts of Campgaw disappearing, and it was kind of sad for those of us who grew up going there. My cousin lived in Mahwah (and back in the 1960s her address was still and RFD #) and Campgaw was nearby.

I agree with you that Ramapo Reservation is a very nice place for hiking or whatever! Spent a lot of time there, too.
My response was more a question, was it just people selling their land to developers that took away the open space or was it the county actually selling off its land?
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Old 10-05-2012, 07:49 PM
 
4,289 posts, read 10,779,583 times
Reputation: 3811
I agree. While its obviously not possible everywhere due to structures built near the highway, a minimum of 4 lanes is needed for every major stretch of road. This is the most densely populated state, we should have the best highways. unfortunately, they are terrible.

And why does every single bit of construction take forever? Highways are highly used services. Every effort should be made to do these projects in as little time as possible.
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Old 10-05-2012, 08:48 PM
 
Location: NJ & NV
5,773 posts, read 16,606,225 times
Reputation: 2475
Whilst I agree with the spirit of your post, the reality in places is we still have a few sections of state highways where the road is laid out to be four lanes, two each way divided, but only half is paved. I think money is the obvious issue. For instance Route 66 in Neptune and that big stretch of Rt 34 through the Navy weapons place. Even the bridges are all set up for four lanes, just never paved. You can tell by looking US 202 from Somerville down was like that originally but I've driven that since the early 70's and it must've been dualized some years before that.
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Old 10-06-2012, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
88,669 posts, read 84,974,162 times
Reputation: 115227
Quote:
Originally Posted by captne76 View Post
At some point I-95 will eventually be connected together, that project is a big part of it. I-95 will leave the NJ Tpike at Exit 6 and go over what is now I-276 then connect to the rest of I-95 to/from Philly and Florida, etc. The two roadways have gone over/under each other with no ramps since they where built, mostly because they expected NJ to build I-95 which did not happen down there.
Interesting. Sounds as if it's something that's long overdue.
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Old 10-06-2012, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
88,669 posts, read 84,974,162 times
Reputation: 115227
Quote:
Originally Posted by GiantRutgersfan View Post
I agree. While its obviously not possible everywhere due to structures built near the highway, a minimum of 4 lanes is needed for every major stretch of road. This is the most densely populated state, we should have the best highways. unfortunately, they are terrible.

And why does every single bit of construction take forever? Highways are highly used services. Every effort should be made to do these projects in as little time as possible.
They do. Usually it's the opposite--depending upon the interest of the politicians, such projects are often expected to be completed faster than it's possible to actually do them. There is a lot more involved than just getting some trucks and guys together and saying, hey, let's roll over there and pave out some new road.

Unfortunately, the public doesn't get to see the details of how much is involved in the background of doing any sort of transportation project. Not even counting the political issues and the funding issues, which are a whole animal in themselves, the logistics of many of these projects include details that most people never even think of.

The other day I saw this interesting animation accompanied by recordings of the actual radio transmissions of what it takes to shut down the Brooklyn Bridge for the fast-track deck replacement that's going on right now. They close the bridge every night at 11 and then reopen with one lane of traffic going each way while they work on the other side. Then the reverse has to happen by 7 a.m. so that the bridge is reopened. It doesn't sound all that complicated, but it is. There were probably a dozen points of access throughout the city on both sides of the approaches to the BB at which the traffic has to be closed off in sequence and rerouted to one side of the bridge, and just one slip-up could result in an accident. It was pretty amazing to see the coordination this took (from an aerial view) just to get access to where the construction work has to be done.

I think that the transportation agencies should do a better job of informing the public as to some of these details of the hurdles and challenges inherent in major transportation projects in a way that the lay person can grasp the concepts. The public might have more patience if things were explained to them.

Here's an example. Every time there is a highly-publicized suicide wherein somebody jumped from one of the metro area's bridges, you hear people screaming why don't "they" put fences up on the bridges so that people can't jump, thinking you can just slap up a tall fence on the side of an existing bridge and be done with it. That fence could cause wind-loading problems, however, that would affect the performance and safety of the bridge and possibly put a lot more people in danger--namely those driving over the bridge in their automobiles--than it would to save the occasional person who wants to use the bridge as the vehicle to reach their death goal. Suicide fences have been added to bridges in other parts of the country, and engineers are trying to figure out ways to install them here and on bridges in other parts of the country, but each existing bridge--bridges that were NOT designed to carry those fences in the first place--has to be analyzed and engineered individually based on location, wind conditions, etc.

As a lay person who gets to hear some of this stuff, I think that could be my second career--translating construction stories from engineerese to English for public consumption. LOL.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:41 PM
 
Location: West Orange, NJ
12,546 posts, read 21,421,366 times
Reputation: 3730
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nunnor View Post
On I-95 in South Florida there are 5 - 7 lanes per direction. Many parts of California same thing.
i remember 5 or 6 in california near L.A., but that's a prime example of why public transit needs to be added...traffic is horrible there. I've driven I-95 in florida, and i don't remember it ever being wider than 4. but i guess it's possible depending where you're talking. i would hardly use Florida as an example for anything related to driving though.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:50 PM
 
Location: NJ
31,771 posts, read 40,749,013 times
Reputation: 24590
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
they just encourage Sprawl
sprawl is more people actually trying to improve their lives by not living like animals in a city.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:50 PM
 
Location: West Orange, NJ
12,546 posts, read 21,421,366 times
Reputation: 3730
Quote:
Originally Posted by captne76 View Post
Whilst I agree with the spirit of your post, the reality in places is we still have a few sections of state highways where the road is laid out to be four lanes, two each way divided, but only half is paved. I think money is the obvious issue. For instance Route 66 in Neptune and that big stretch of Rt 34 through the Navy weapons place. Even the bridges are all set up for four lanes, just never paved. You can tell by looking US 202 from Somerville down was like that originally but I've driven that since the early 70's and it must've been dualized some years before that.
we don't even have the funds to maintain our existing total mileage, let alone adding to it. most dollars should go towards ways to get people out of cars, not more into them. anything else is very irresponsible right now.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:53 PM
 
1,247 posts, read 3,028,167 times
Reputation: 651
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainNJ View Post
sprawl is more people actually trying to improve their lives by not living like animals in a city.
Which in turn makes them live like animals in the suburbs.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:55 PM
 
Location: West Orange, NJ
12,546 posts, read 21,421,366 times
Reputation: 3730
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
They do. Usually it's the opposite--depending upon the interest of the politicians, such projects are often expected to be completed faster than it's possible to actually do them. There is a lot more involved than just getting some trucks and guys together and saying, hey, let's roll over there and pave out some new road.

Unfortunately, the public doesn't get to see the details of how much is involved in the background of doing any sort of transportation project. Not even counting the political issues and the funding issues, which are a whole animal in themselves, the logistics of many of these projects include details that most people never even think of.

The other day I saw this interesting animation accompanied by recordings of the actual radio transmissions of what it takes to shut down the Brooklyn Bridge for the fast-track deck replacement that's going on right now. They close the bridge every night at 11 and then reopen with one lane of traffic going each way while they work on the other side. Then the reverse has to happen by 7 a.m. so that the bridge is reopened. It doesn't sound all that complicated, but it is. There were probably a dozen points of access throughout the city on both sides of the approaches to the BB at which the traffic has to be closed off in sequence and rerouted to one side of the bridge, and just one slip-up could result in an accident. It was pretty amazing to see the coordination this took (from an aerial view) just to get access to where the construction work has to be done.

I think that the transportation agencies should do a better job of informing the public as to some of these details of the hurdles and challenges inherent in major transportation projects in a way that the lay person can grasp the concepts. The public might have more patience if things were explained to them.

Here's an example. Every time there is a highly-publicized suicide wherein somebody jumped from one of the metro area's bridges, you hear people screaming why don't "they" put fences up on the bridges so that people can't jump, thinking you can just slap up a tall fence on the side of an existing bridge and be done with it. That fence could cause wind-loading problems, however, that would affect the performance and safety of the bridge and possibly put a lot more people in danger--namely those driving over the bridge in their automobiles--than it would to save the occasional person who wants to use the bridge as the vehicle to reach their death goal. Suicide fences have been added to bridges in other parts of the country, and engineers are trying to figure out ways to install them here and on bridges in other parts of the country, but each existing bridge--bridges that were NOT designed to carry those fences in the first place--has to be analyzed and engineered individually based on location, wind conditions, etc.

As a lay person who gets to hear some of this stuff, I think that could be my second career--translating construction stories from engineerese to English for public consumption. LOL.
honestly, and I know there will be many "the sky is falling" responses to this suggestion, but:

i always wondered, how bad would it really be if they just shut a bridge down for a short period of time, did all of the work, and then reopened it? the quantity of time lost in that setting up and breaking down each night has to be large. and, people would simply be forced into figuring out some better ways to move around. i know it's not possible in every situation, but i wonder sometimes, how bad would it really be?
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