U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Jersey
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:02 AM
 
2,535 posts, read 6,167,654 times
Reputation: 1595

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jy_2007 View Post
so, you are saying definitively that correlation implies causation in this case?
Absolutely not. That would be saying that every kid that goes to "good" school X would go to a better college than "bad" school Y and that is obviously not the case. Thankfully you don't need that false prophecy to explore macro trends.
Rate this post positively

 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:03 AM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 43,302,640 times
Reputation: 16210
I doubt anyone is going to change their mind on the topic based on what they read here. At the end of the day you put your money where your mouth is. Pay up for the better school districts or don't.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:05 AM
 
206 posts, read 491,459 times
Reputation: 146
Or do a Trading-Places style of experiment where you take a middle-of-the-pack student from Millburn and swap them with Eddie Murphy, and watch hilarity ensue.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:13 AM
 
357 posts, read 965,735 times
Reputation: 218
Exactly, it is funny. Send your kids to the school you choose. I will send mine where I choose.

There is a reason why successful people send their kids to the best schools.

Quote:
Originally Posted by manderly6 View Post
I doubt anyone is going to change their mind on the topic based on what they read here. At the end of the day you put your money where your mouth is. Pay up for the better school districts or don't.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:21 AM
 
Location: High Bridge, NJ
3,858 posts, read 9,184,546 times
Reputation: 3364
Quote:
Originally Posted by imoapie View Post
There is a reason why successful people send their kids to the best schools.
These threads wouldn't be complete without a condescending jab at those who dare to live in a mediocre school district.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Fair Lawn, NJ
231 posts, read 471,104 times
Reputation: 256
I went to one of the best High Schools in NYC but ended up not doing too well in school. While all my friends in my school went to Ivy Leagues, I ended up at Rutgers. Looking back now, while I put the blame on myself for not doing well, the friends I had played a huge part in where my priorities were. My closest friends didn't go to my HS. In fact, they went to 'bad' schools and didn't have much drive to study hard. While I'm sure there are hardworking, studious kids in the 'bad' schools, I'm willing to bet that you'd find better students at the 'good' schools.

What am i saying? at the end of the day, i want my kids to be friends with kids that are studious and hardworking (and not slackers like my friends were). I'm a believer that the company you keep in some ways shapes your priorities.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:28 AM
 
256 posts, read 342,359 times
Reputation: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by rocknyc View Post
I went to one of the best High Schools in NYC but ended up not doing too well in school. While all my friends in my school went to Ivy Leagues, I ended up at Rutgers. Looking back now, while I put the blame on myself for not doing well, the friends I had played a huge part in where my priorities were. My closest friends didn't go to my HS. In fact, they went to 'bad' schools and didn't have much drive to study hard. While I'm sure there are hardworking, studious kids in the 'bad' schools, I'm willing to bet that you'd find better students at the 'good' schools.

What am i saying? at the end of the day, i want my kids to be friends with kids that are studious and hardworking (and not slackers like my friends were). I'm a believer that the company you keep in some ways shapes your priorities.
What you just said pretty much sums up my own experience. I want to be involved in my children's education, but I also want them to be surrounded by like-minded people. That is, having friends who value education over staying home and watching TV.

As I said in my other threads, I am looking into Fair Lawn, NJ. I know it's not Ridgewood or Tenafly, but if it's a school that can send its best kids to some of the best colleges then I'm sold.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:29 AM
 
Location: now nyc
1,457 posts, read 4,015,075 times
Reputation: 1272
lol, some of you guys speak of Rutgers as if it's the University of Phoenix or Community College
Rate this post positively
 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:36 AM
 
1,041 posts, read 2,811,846 times
Reputation: 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdavis44 View Post
Tony you're crazy if you don't think there can be massive differences in teacher quality. Again, just going off my own personal experience, there was tremendous difference and it had a direct impact on how much i learned in the class. Great teachers can make an amazing impact on a student's life/trajectory. Your point might be that a higher-rated district doesn't necessarily have better teachers (just richer and more involved parents), and teacher quality is something that can't be proven by district summary stats because of all the confounding variables. That, i would agree with. However, if you really think 90% of teachers are created equal and thus it doesn't matter where you go to school, you're very very wrong (at least for some types of kids).
That is what i was trying to say.

I mean look at that stuff going on in Summit right now. 400 unannounced visitors a day. A majority probably stay at home helicopter moms right? They are going to be diggining in that kids ***** 24/7. With that level of "parental involvement" of course the chances are greater the kid will succeed. It goes back to what badfish said about having the parents do the kids 3rd grade project.

All I am saying is that the schools argument is a facade. What it really means is generally wealthy area thats high on the socio economic scale. It has NOTHING to do with the "schools". If i suddenly bussed all of West Windsor kids to camden schools and vice versa, guess what will happen to those respectives schools rankings? Yeah, its the schools.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:40 AM
 
1,041 posts, read 2,811,846 times
Reputation: 772
Quote:
Originally Posted by imoapie View Post
Exactly, it is funny. Send your kids to the school you choose. I will send mine where I choose.

There is a reason why successful people send their kids to the best schools.
I'm an engineer. I work with a couple Cooper Union Graduates. If you arent aware, Cooper Union is a SMALL private school that picks the very best students in the city for engineering for free. These guys swear they are geniuses and look down at any other college. Guess what, WE ALL WORK AT THE SAME PLACE. We are all ENGINEERS. And I make more than a few of them.

So I ask, what's the end game imoapie?
Rate this post positively
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Jersey

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:00 PM.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top