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Old 07-26-2013, 02:59 PM
 
1,248 posts, read 2,788,867 times
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Additionally, ivy league schools like taking in students that do well in low performing school districts.
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Old 07-26-2013, 06:24 PM
 
256 posts, read 342,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HubCityMadMan View Post
Additionally, ivy league schools like taking in students that do well in low performing school districts.
Reference?

How do you know that?
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Old 07-26-2013, 06:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradykp View Post
My buddy who went to MIT looks at his connections on LinkedIn and jokes about what a failure he feels like compared to his classmates. His "failure"? He makes 6 figures as the right-hand man to a CFO of a very well respected non profit. But his friends from college are all on their 2nd or 3rd company that they've started and/or sold to a big tech firm (his one buddy founded Drop Box for instance).
One person I knew in college, a state school that its president termed a "mediocre party school", co-founded a big tech firm. (Alas, I did not keep up with him, though I did coincidentally end up working for the company)

In engineering, at least software engineering, you bet that a top school matters for getting into the big firms. But on the other hand, it's getting a bit ridiculous in that a Masters degree is getting to be important. That has its bad points, but it also means you can take a lower track -- middling high school to middling undergraduate school -- and then get the prestige points by getting a Masters in a more prestigious school.

It seems that competition for the top colleges has gotten ridiculous, and so the top high schools have gotten ridiculous. Maybe West Windsor sends all its kids into space, whereas Millburn has then all build robots and Ridgewood sends them to the United Nations for a semester or something. But I don't think every kid is going to thrive in that kind of environment, and I don't think it's necessary for success.
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Old 07-26-2013, 06:36 PM
 
10,016 posts, read 17,197,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradykp View Post
the more AP courses a school offers, the more opportunity you get.
Not sure if this is still true, but you used to be able to take the test without having the course too.
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Old 07-26-2013, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
2,099 posts, read 3,212,459 times
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I don't think it matters nearly as much as some of the public worker apologists on this forum indicate.
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Old 07-26-2013, 08:21 PM
 
1,248 posts, read 2,788,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by d_vader123 View Post
Reference?

How do you know that?
Because a I knew a kid from one of the poorest neighborhoods in New York City that did extremely well at a public high school there and in turn ended up going to Princeton.
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:02 PM
 
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Funny.. I know a valedictorian from a small town in Texas that struggled to compete for positions in a ivy league schools because of the small low ranking...
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:05 PM
 
Location: NJ
516 posts, read 888,524 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HubCityMadMan View Post
Because a I knew a kid from one of the poorest neighborhoods in New York City that did extremely well at a public high school there and in turn ended up going to Princeton.
Did you ask him how many of his classmates at Princeton were from a similar background (****ty school) as him compared to how many were from the best high schools in the country?
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:10 PM
 
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Its kinda like a job interview...

The more opportunities / challenges presented and how well you succeed speaks to your ability academically. Better schools in general yield better opportunities (more college level courses, opportunities to hold officer positions in clubs etc).... You are also competing for a finite number seats into the university of choice. I'm sure there is a combination of factors considered but you'd be naive to think it doesn't have a significant influence.

In parallel.... do you think an Ive league education have weight in the hiring process of a recent grad? I can say 100% yes. I've been on the list at several jobs to interview new candidates. The discussion with the hiring manager almost always involves the college/university as well as the degree. It doesn't mean its the only factor... I'm one of the only people at work (do well too) that does not carry an advanced degree. Thankful that the organization is giving me a chance based on my hard work.

Others.... go to a community college to further back their academic capabilities and re-apply to the university of choice later. More than one way. Never rule out an individual with motivation and personal strength to overcome obstacles.


btw... Its often uncomfortable to rule out a candidate due to education criteria set forth by the hiring manager. Often its criteria I myself wouldn't meet. But I came into the organization with work experience. So much like going to community college first, there is more than one path.

Last edited by usayit; 07-26-2013 at 09:19 PM..
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Old 07-26-2013, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Rutgers '17
386 posts, read 801,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocknyc View Post
Yeah well when you're talking to your school friends about where everybody is going for college and all you hear is Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford, etc...Rutgers does feel like it's the University of Phoenix.
Your problem is the fact that you are obsessed with image and have had an immense exposure to elitism in your lifetime.

I have a friend who is going through the same thing. Does the feeling suck? Yeah kinda. Does a Rutgers education suck? Nope.

I wouldn't say it's quite at the University of Phoenix-level, though.
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