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Old 11-24-2007, 01:42 PM
 
3 posts, read 10,045 times
Reputation: 11

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Almost everyone would agree that teachers are underpaid. As salaries go up, the "best and brightest" might be more attracted to teaching as a profession. We don't need more lawyers and Wall Street sharks, that's for sure.

It is unfortunate, but our society unfairly rewards intelligence and beauty. Look at the ridiculous amounts of money that entertainers make. Scholarships are usually given to the highest achievers, which is unfair, because, in general, those lucky students are also gifted with the highest intelligence. Beauty queens can hold out for the most lucrative offer of marriage, while the handsome candidate has an edge in job recruitment interviews.

Maybe scholarships should be given to those who have the most need, regardless of intelligence or ability. Scholarships perpetuate a culture of success for the intelligent, while leaving those who are less fortunate to fend for themselves.
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Old 11-24-2007, 02:22 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,283 posts, read 35,677,666 times
Reputation: 5331
Quote:
Originally Posted by dianemar View Post
Almost everyone would agree that teachers are underpaid. As salaries go up, the "best and brightest" might be more attracted to teaching as a profession. We don't need more lawyers and Wall Street sharks, that's for sure.
unfortunately, reading through the 20 pages of this thread, a lot of people feel the exact opposite.
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Old 11-24-2007, 08:00 PM
 
Location: New Jersey/Florida
5,818 posts, read 12,620,766 times
Reputation: 4414
Quote:
Originally Posted by dianemar View Post
Almost everyone would agree that teachers are underpaid. As salaries go up, the "best and brightest" might be more attracted to teaching as a profession. We don't need more lawyers and Wall Street sharks, that's for sure.

It is unfortunate, but our society unfairly rewards intelligence and beauty. Look at the ridiculous amounts of money that entertainers make. Scholarships are usually given to the highest achievers, which is unfair, because, in general, those lucky students are also gifted with the highest intelligence. Beauty queens can hold out for the most lucrative offer of marriage, while the handsome candidate has an edge in job recruitment interviews.

Maybe scholarships should be given to those who have the most need, regardless of intelligence or ability. Scholarships perpetuate a culture of success for the intelligent, while leaving those who are less fortunate to fend for themselves.
So your saying that the highest achievers who broke there chops studying all along should not be rewarded and the scholarships should be giving to the needy students that maybe didn't study to hard. BIG DISAGREE. If the kid breaks his or her butt reward them. Not someone that cuts class and does not put in the xtra effort thats needed for maybe getting a scholarship.
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Old 11-24-2007, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Martinsville, NJ
6,175 posts, read 12,933,690 times
Reputation: 4020
Quote:
Originally Posted by dianemar View Post
It is unfortunate, but our society unfairly rewards intelligence and beauty. Look at the ridiculous amounts of money that entertainers make. Scholarships are usually given to the highest achievers, which is unfair, because, in general, those lucky students are also gifted with the highest intelligence. <SNIP>
Maybe scholarships should be given to those who have the most need, regardless of intelligence or ability. Scholarships perpetuate a culture of success for the intelligent, while leaving those who are less fortunate to fend for themselves.
Huh? You're really complaining because scolarships are given to the highest acheivers? It's a bad thing that scolarships perpetuate a culture of success for the intelligent? You want to somehow punish the highest acheivers by denying them an opportunity to go to school, in favor of someone who has not demonstrated the aptitude to acheive & succeed? If you follow that out to a conclusion, where do you see it leading? Colleges & universities filled to the rafters with reliably unintelligent underacheivers who will likely continue in their mediocrity and never do anything special, while a host of hardworking intelligent students who made the mistake of working hard to do well are denied the opportunity to further their educations. I can see it now, in the high school guidance counselors office; "Mary, you're spectacularly gifted & intelligent, especially in the areas of math & science which you love so much, and I think you'd do really well at MIT. I know you can't afford to go to such a school without some assistance, so you'd really better start failing some classes if you want to have any hope of getting a scholarship. Do you think you can manage to goof off enough to get a C on your AP Calculus midterm?" Yeah, that's what we want to foster.

Last edited by Bill Keegan; 11-24-2007 at 09:05 PM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 11-24-2007, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,297 posts, read 120,694,120 times
Reputation: 35920
This thread has veered off-topic a bit, but I'll go along with that and add my opinion about scholarships. In my experience of putting 1 1/2 kids through college (youngest has 2 yrs to go), I learned this: Financially - If you are practically destitute, you can get grants in aid from the feds (money you don't have to pay back) to go to college. If you are judged merely needy (you have to fill out a long form called the FAFSA), you will be awarded low-interest loans and work-study jobs. If you are none of the above, you can take out regular loans. Academically - It doesn't matter if you are financially in need, you can get merit based aid from the college. The colleges make their own subjective decisions about this.
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Old 11-28-2007, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Orlando, FL
12,200 posts, read 18,369,438 times
Reputation: 6655
Quote:
Originally Posted by markhunt View Post
i wasn't saying it would increase pay, i meant that if masters were required we would lose teachers because the salaries here would not justify this requirement.

The salary for a teacher in new england is much higher than the salary here and yes it is more expensive to live in new england, but not that much more. the salaries up north are much more in line with the cost of living, then they are here.
I thought this was a funny thing to share. On the FL board they are complaining because teachers don't have to have a masters to teach. And according to FL residents your salaries are closer to the cost of living. I guess no matter what state you live in, you have a problem with teachers!
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Old 02-13-2008, 07:30 PM
 
276 posts, read 1,458,153 times
Reputation: 166
I just had to bump this thread. I just received a job offer as a school nurse practitioner, basically providing health care, doing check-ups, immunizations, and such in a school setting. The job was listed as a part-time job. I interviewed assuming part-time means 2 or 3 days per week. Nope - it's teachers hours, 5 days per week. It's because I'd have summers off.

The reason for the disparity - the school board has partnered with a hospital and the hospital actually employs the nurse practitioner. The hospital goes by true number of hours worked. If the school board had been the employer, the job would have certainly been full-time.

The job requires attending back to school nights, conferences/appointments with parents after school hours, and teaching a few health classes every day. So the teachers I'd be working with are full-time employees, but I'd be a part-time employee, working the exact same hours.

The disparity really irritates me, but I'm used to getting paid only for hours I've worked in my field, so I'm considering it.
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Old 02-13-2008, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Midwest transplant
2,050 posts, read 5,941,289 times
Reputation: 1623
I didn't read the entire thread, but I was a teacher in NJ in the early 80's when we made far below the cost of living, most teachers had to work a second job, and another full time job during the summer to be able to pay rent on a moderate apartment and meet their other expenses (like a $125 month car payment)! The $18,500 was in about 1985, so it's been 22 years. At the time, I was making that with 5 years of experience, so all of us that were at or below the 18.5 in '85 got raises of about $100 year and thought we had hit pay dirt!
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Old 02-14-2008, 09:30 AM
sj3
 
118 posts, read 634,545 times
Reputation: 58
As a former teacher, I was not making that when I left teaching 2 years ago. WOW is all I can say. I was making 47,000 with 12 years experience. I can tell you that I have clocked my weekly hours and the least I worked per week was 60 hours. Some times of the year I was working upwards of 75 hours per week. Now this is after all those years. When I first started we were in negotiations and were told to tally our hours. I never worked less than 80. I usually took the first couple weeks in the summer off (after I spent a week packing up my room for summer cleaning) but my late July I was back to work. I worked the rest of the summer preparing. Yes, I made my own hours, but I worked a decent amount weekly to get ready. Unpaid mind you. No summer pay where I was.
before you knock teachers, do it for a week.
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Old 02-14-2008, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Bergen County, NJ
370 posts, read 1,369,737 times
Reputation: 178
I am one of those who think teachers have a pretty good deal. I start to wonder if I made a mistake not going into that field myself.
3 very good friends as well as my sister are teachers and they are the 1st ones to tell you they have it made. 2 teach Gym, 1 Computers in a Lower Class area and the other is a 4th grade teacher. The 4th Grade Teacher has it the hardest but the others are living the easy life. They leave early and do NO work at home and they make very good money for what they do.
On a side note 2 girls from my HS who got left back and wound up taking the GED are now teachers... these girls couldn't walk and talk at the same time without getting confused. It doesn't give teachers too much credit in my eyes.
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