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Old 09-26-2013, 10:14 AM
 
3,578 posts, read 3,600,741 times
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When will blue states in general that high tax don't work?

Will see how much more people move out when Affordable Care Act AKA Obamacare kick in next year.


New Jersey

Quote:
Neptune, New Jersey (My9NJ) - New Jersey is experiencing a shortage of doctors. In fact, it’s projected that by 2020 the state will be about 3,000 primary care physicians short of what is needed to give optimal health care.
So why are doctors fleeing the Garden State?
According to Deborah Briggs, the President and CEO of the Council of Teaching Hospitals, New Jersey loses nearly 70% of the doctors it educates to other states. This is well below the national average of a 48% retention rate.
In other words, in 2013 New Jersey only kept about 34% of the doctors who were educated and trained in the state.

The Council of Teaching Hospitals and a nationwide study done by Merritt Hawkins, says New Jersey is just not competitive when it comes to keeping doctors in state.
The top five reasons for physicians leaving are:
  • Better salary offered outside of New Jersey
  • Cost of living in New Jersey
  • Better job/practice opportunities in desired locations outside of New Jersey
  • Taxes in New Jersey
  • Affordable Housing
Assemblywoman Amy Handlin and Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande gathered doctors, residents, hospital managers, and specialist at Jersey Shore Medical Center to discuss New Jersey’s doctor drain.
The room was filled with 40 or so doctors who also added malpractice insurance issues to the list, explaining that it’s just too expensive to start a practice here.
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Old 09-26-2013, 10:17 AM
 
Location: NJ
17,578 posts, read 43,873,481 times
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I was just reading how this is going to be a problem everywhere. Lots of doctors are retiring. Less doctors taking their spots. Population getting older. Obviously it will be even worse for states that are not business friendly.
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Old 09-26-2013, 10:25 AM
 
39,193 posts, read 26,669,950 times
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How will ACA make it worse? This is not a government run health plan, the plans are going to be the same plans available right now for individualsl Blue Cross, etc. They aren't going to pay any less than they already do. It should make it better for Dr's if people who didn't have insurance before do now.
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Old 09-26-2013, 10:32 AM
 
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More Romneycare hysteria. If a dr. can't make it in NJ, then trade in the Benz for a Lexus. Rich people problems.
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Old 09-26-2013, 10:38 AM
 
Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
How will ACA make it worse?
more people covered means a higher patient to doctor ratio.
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Old 09-26-2013, 10:52 AM
 
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i bought my house from a couple (both husband and wife are doctors in their 40s) still have a huge mortgage on their home.
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Old 09-26-2013, 11:05 AM
 
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If there are less drs. we just import them from India. Globalism at work.
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Old 09-26-2013, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,216 posts, read 27,065,128 times
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According to Deborah Briggs, the President and CEO of the Council of Teaching Hospitals, New Jersey loses nearly 70% of the doctors it educates to other states. This is well below the national average of a 48% retention rate.
In other words, in 2013 New Jersey only kept about 34% of the doctors who were educated and trained in the state.



Why does that suprise anyone, it costs a fortune to set up a private practice, Dr just out of training is not going to make the salary of a seasoned doctor and lord knows they are hundreds of thousand dollars in debt from college and med school loans add all that in and they can't afford to live here at the beginning of their career.
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Old 09-26-2013, 11:43 AM
 
Location: NJ
31,773 posts, read 37,317,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njkate View Post
Dr just out of training is not going to make the salary of a seasoned doctor and lord knows they are hundreds of thousand dollars in debt from college and med school loans add all that in and they can't afford to live here at the beginning of their career.
do more seasoned doctors bill insurance companies more money for the same services as new doctors? another question i have would be what are the differences for what doctors get paid for the same services in various states? if you can bill almost the same in a state with a much lower cost of living; then you are better off practicing there.
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Old 09-26-2013, 12:15 PM
 
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I don't think the billing is different but new doctors are less likely to have a private practice because they have not built up a patient base. Most recent grads work in hospitals, rehab centers, assisted living facilities and such until they are more seasoned. Or they will have a very small private practice supplemented by patients they meet/treat in the hospitals.

Ultimately, they will not be making the same amount of money as someone who has been in the DR business for a long time. Then again, I've meet a few rockstars of the MD community that are damn near poor because they had/have no business sense and ruined themselves financially.
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