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Old 02-19-2020, 05:36 PM
 
Location: state of transition
390 posts, read 180,580 times
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Is New Mexico a state where population is growing (similar to Arizona?) Are people moving to New Mexico in droves and is the price of real estate rising?
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Old 02-19-2020, 08:07 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
26,530 posts, read 45,298,293 times
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From: http://worldpopulationreview.com/sta...co-population/

The population has not changed much in the past 10 years:

Year Population % Change
------ ------------ -------
2020 2,096,640 0.03%
2019 2,096,034 0.03%
2018 2,095,428 0.10%
2017 2,093,395 0.03%
2016 2,092,789 0.12%
2015 2,090,211 -0.01%
2014 2,090,342 -0.12%
2013 2,092,792 0.25%
2012 2,087,549 0.34%
2011 2,080,395 0.77%
2010 2,064,588 1.27%
2000 1,819,046 1.85%
1990 1,515,069 1.52%
1980 1,302,894 2.52%
1970 1,016,000 0.66%
1960 951,023 3.39%
1950 681,187 2.51%
1940 531,818 2.31%
1930 423,317 1.62%
1920 360,350 0.97%
1910 327,301 5.30%
1900 195,310 2.00%
1890 160,282 2.97%
1880 119,565 2.67%
1870 91,874 0.54%
1860 87,034 3.53%
1850 61,547 0.00%


You can look up Arizona on Page: http://worldpopulationreview.com/sta...na-population/

From 1990 to 2000, Arizona was the second fastest growing state, increasing its population by nearly 40 percent. From 2010 to 2015, Arizona was the seventh fastest-growing state, posting a cumulative growth of 6.82%.

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 02-19-2020 at 08:16 PM..
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Old 02-20-2020, 09:41 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
87,901 posts, read 81,736,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoadLessTraveled2015 View Post
Is New Mexico a state where population is growing (similar to Arizona?) Are people moving to New Mexico in droves and is the price of real estate rising?
No, not like Arizona. It's a good question, though; why does AZ get all those droves, & NM not? IDK. NM is a little more isolated? Phoenix and surrounding cities have a more high-end image? AZ is closer to CA, especially LA, where a strong percentage of the those transplants are from, fleeing high taxes in CA? So they're within a day's drive of LA, for visiting friends & family?

I gave it my best shot.
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Old 02-20-2020, 10:46 AM
 
Location: NM
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I expect population growth to pick up steam a bit when more people start getting priced out of Colorado, Nevada and Arizona.
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Old 02-20-2020, 12:29 PM
 
Location: state of transition
390 posts, read 180,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
No, not like Arizona. It's a good question, though; why does AZ get all those droves, & NM not? IDK. NM is a little more isolated? Phoenix and surrounding cities have a more high-end image? AZ is closer to CA, especially LA, where a strong percentage of the those transplants are from, fleeing high taxes in CA? So they're within a day's drive of LA, for visiting friends & family?

I gave it my best shot.

Interesting. That does make sense.
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Old 02-20-2020, 12:31 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spudcommando View Post
I expect population growth to pick up steam a bit when more people start getting priced out of Colorado, Nevada and Arizona.
Interesting theory. Not that growth is necessarily a good thing, in the middle of a desert. If that does happen, people may be left literally high and dry as water becomes more scarce when, say, their kids are grown.
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Old 02-20-2020, 12:31 PM
TKO
 
Location: On the Border
4,153 posts, read 3,657,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
No, not like Arizona. It's a good question, though; why does AZ get all those droves, & NM not? IDK. NM is a little more isolated? Phoenix and surrounding cities have a more high-end image? AZ is closer to CA, especially LA, where a strong percentage of the those transplants are from, fleeing high taxes in CA? So they're within a day's drive of LA, for visiting friends & family?

I gave it my best shot.
Not that your reasoning isn't also correct. We're poor. Outside of retirees, people usually relocate for economic opportunities.
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Old 02-20-2020, 01:10 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
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Arizona population growth almost defies logic given the heat, desert, and lack of water. The place where most of the people settle is naturally inhospitable and sprawl from horizon to horizon. From 2000 to today the population grew about 2.3 million to over 7 mi!lion in the state. Over that same period, New Mexico grew by about 32,000 (I am not complaining!)

Arizona benefits from its close proximity to southern California and by decades of hype as the promised land for retirees not interested in living in Florida. Corporations can expand into AZ from California with shorter transit and logistic concerns. That brings jobs and people.

Nevada, also close to California, added a million people in the last twenty years - starting out lower than NM and now with a million more residents. New Mexico's population hasn't changed significantly and is less than Brooklyn NY.

New Mexico has a public awareness problem -- the state that isn't. Most Americans don't "get it". It is the space you drive through between Texas and Arizona/California. Tourism did a survey a few years ago and New Mexico was way down on the list of p!aces that come to mind as tourism destinations. Many people think Santa Fe is in Arizona.

New Mexico is a very different place. The terrain is scenic, high desert and mountains. The climate is a pleasant, four seasons with no extremes. It is probably more noticeably diverse in population and culture, blended into something unique, than most of the country. Even the history is different. This is the birthplace of "Southwestern" architecture, art, literature, and food. With all of that, it is still kind of a place apart from the rest...unfamiliar.

I have an analogy that sort of fits how the Federal government, and maybe some of corporate America, has wrongly viewed NM: as the trunk of the car. It's part of the car but out of sight and out of mind unless there is a problem, unless you want to store stuff you don't want to see. It is where you can hide stuff without it being noticed. You can test weapons, missiles, blow stuff up, dump stuff even. It is the fifth largest state with a very small population so that makes it easier.
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Old 02-20-2020, 01:38 PM
 
Location: 32°19'03.7"N 106°43'55.9"W
8,290 posts, read 18,224,873 times
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TKO mentions we are poor. This is true. Why are we poor? I think much of this is because our college graduates relocate to states and cities that have private sector employers with highly skilled, high paying jobs. Why aren't those companies located in New Mexico? It's because we are a business-hostile state. The gross receipts tax that taxes services as well as goods is the main ingredient in this equation. These companies will park their investment dollars in states that do not have this tax. Arizona, Colorado, Utah and Texas all have far friendlier business climates than New Mexico. So we lose our best and brightest to neighboring more competitive states. This state seems to favor propping up the welfare state and being more generous to those who remain, and typically don't have the skills to retain anything approaching a livable wage to buy a home. The builders have to pass along the costs of construction down to the buyer, because the GRT is value-added tax: each entity that touches the process of constructing a home (developers, builders, banks, title and escrow) have to keep adding on the tax for their services. Home costs are disproportionate to what a younger person living here can pay, so the result is rent-controlled section 8 housing. It's a process where everything affects everything else. A state cannot merely exist on someone's labor when it is taxed so highly. If New Mexico could waive the gross receipts tax, not right away, but within a generation quality of life here would begin to improve.
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Old 02-20-2020, 02:30 PM
 
1,002 posts, read 582,512 times
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We had a opportunity to live on a ranch near Ruidoso back in 2003, but rejected it when after talking with our advisor - the main reason was the same as in Colo & Mont - they'd tax our SS benefits and pensions. From what I've read lately to eliminate SS taxation has been shelved by the legislature several times. I suppose they need to have another tax, fee to be in place before they pull it.
The only thing that NM has going for it is the Film Office - production of the Longmire and Deputy series there.
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