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Old 09-13-2009, 11:39 PM
 
475 posts, read 1,155,090 times
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Leaving the topic of paranoia and going back to mountains:

There are three 13ers in NM if you count only independent peaks. There is an exact definition of independent peaks but I forget it. No 14ers -- nothing close.

They are Wheeler and two of the Truchas peaks. I can see the Truchas from my home, but that is because I am in the north end of Santa Fe County. I think the best mountain views are probably in Taos.

Santa Fe Baldy is the highest of those near Santa Fe but it is 12,600. Still it is higher than any NM mountain to the south of it.

I sometimes think we should measure relative height -- how far it is from the valley floor -- for instance when I look at the Truchas -- they are only seven thousand feet above me.

New Mexico also has a lot of national forest and wilderness area. Look at a map and national forests make up a lot of those giant green areas in norhern NM.
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Old 09-14-2009, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Ruidoso, NM
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For the sake of argument - which trolling invokes - let's all assume that Interstate 40 running east-west - demarcates the "North vs South" divide. If we agree to do that, then I can add quite a few sites to my list that might otherwise be considered "central NM."

For Example:

El Malpais National Monument (south of Grants).
The VLA (very large array) astronomical site (west of Socorro).
Ft. Sumner and Bosque Redondo historical sites.
Pie Town - put on the map by various authors and photographers over the years.
The Salinas Pueblos National Monument - 3 pueblo ruins near Mountainair.
Valley of Fires state park (Carrizozo)
Monjeau Peak lookout - unique rock structure built in 1938 near Ruidoso.
Smokey Bear museum (Capitan). People detour from IH-35 to visit there.
El Morro national monument.
Acoma Pueblo - one of the most famous of the preserved pueblos.
First Atom Bomb site (east of San Antonio) - open to public twice yearly.

And let's not overlook the historical interest as well as the local beauty of the old mining towns such as: Magdalena, Kingston, Hillsboro, Chloride, White Oaks, Mogollon and others that still have a few year around residents and businesses.

PS - Sierra Blanca peak in the Sacramento Range USED to be considered be 12,003 ft. high, until some spoil sport more accurately gauged it (satellite surveillance??), so now it's officially listed at just under 12,000 ft. - not sure the exact number (11,993 ?).

Last edited by jaxart; 09-14-2009 at 09:23 AM..
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Old 09-14-2009, 09:12 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
26,529 posts, read 45,252,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dobelover View Post
Any opinions as to which part you prefer and why? Which do you think is more scenic, safer, has more to do, friendlier people, etc?
The New Mexico Tourism Department divides New Mexico into five regions which I consider more logical than "Northern New Mexico Vs. Southerm New Mexico".
This isn't a competition, lawsuit or battle. It is a State and I think if your are really interested you might seriously consider a visit, however, even a simple visit is not really adequate to fully understand the fifth largest State in the Union. New Mexico is not for everyone. You might want to visit this page to see the basic five regions: Exploration is not just a spectator sport in New Mexico



Rich
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Old 09-14-2009, 09:12 AM
 
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you are so clever jaxart......i totally forgot about the central regions.....alas, I am a typical troll. LOL
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Old 09-14-2009, 09:29 AM
 
95 posts, read 162,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
The New Mexico Tourism Department divides New Mexico into five regions which I consider more logical than "Northern New Mexico Vs. Southerm New Mexico".
This isn't a competition, lawsuit or battle. It is a State and I think if your are really interested you might seriously consider a visit, however, even a simple visit is not really adequate to fully understand the fifth largest State in the Union. New Mexico is not for everyone. You might want to visit this page to see the basic five regions: Exploration is not just a spectator sport in New Mexico



Rich
This isnt a competition, lawsuit or battle?? Northern Vs. Southern is an expression of comparison. I am thinking you already know thst and are just being a smart Alec, for lack of a better expression.
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Old 09-14-2009, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Ruidoso, NM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
The New Mexico Tourism Department divides New Mexico into five regions which I consider more logical than "Northern New Mexico Vs. Southerm New Mexico".
True. But the NM govering body in Santa Fe's "Round House" has long shown a bias toward those communities and counties south of I-40. Ask anyone in government (community, county or state) how much more difficult a time they have getting anything through the legislative process in Santa Fe. Most will tell you that the Albq-SF regions are favored over "south of I-40" entities.

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Old 09-14-2009, 10:02 AM
 
Location: ABQ
79 posts, read 212,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxart View Post
For the sake of argument - which trolling invokes - let's all assume that Interstate 40 running east-west - demarcates the "North vs South" divide. If we agree to do that, then I can add quite a few sites to my list that might otherwise be considered "central NM."
Wish we could assume such, but the 14 years I've lived in southern NM resulted in anything south of Hwy 380 pretty much not existing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxart View Post
True. But the NM govering body in Santa Fe's "Round House" has long shown a bias toward those communities and counties south of I-40. Ask anyone in government (community, county or state) how much more difficult a time they have getting anything through the legislative process in Santa Fe. Most will tell you that the Albq-SF regions are favored over "south of I-40" entities.

See above comment. I've lived in Alamo-go-nowhere and Lost Causes for a combined 14 years. Sadly, our understanding is nothing below Socorro exists to the state. Shoot, we even had that understanding when I was in high school from 96-00. We, at the high school level, existed when it came to Cross Country, Basketball, and Track though!
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Old 09-14-2009, 10:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxart View Post
True. But the NM govering body in Santa Fe's "Round House" has long shown a bias toward those communities and counties south of I-40. Ask anyone in government (community, county or state) how much more difficult a time they have getting anything through the legislative process in Santa Fe. Most will tell you that the Albq-SF regions are favored over "south of I-40" entities.

The ABQ metro area just has the numbers -- I forget the percentage but it is a big hunk of the state. Also. We don't think of it as a place of great individual wealth, but the total economic power is also a big hunk of the state economy.

Santa Fe has some wealthy individuals plus it seems to be the center of a political network that is a definitely a mixed blessing.
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Old 09-14-2009, 10:32 AM
 
475 posts, read 1,155,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxart View Post

PS - Sierra Blanca peak in the Sacramento Range USED to be considered be 12,003 ft. high, until some spoil sport more accurately gauged it (satellite surveillance??), so now it's officially listed at just under 12,000 ft. - not sure the exact number (11,993 ?).
This reminds me of a Hugh Grant movie where they go pile dirt on top of hill to keep being declared a mountain or maybe some other term.

Maybe a bunch of people can pile rocks up on top of Sierra Blanca. Maybe every hiker could carry one rock. Only seven feet to go.
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Old 09-14-2009, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Metromess
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Poncho_NM: I agree with you and the NM Department of Tourism, and see nothing smart-alecky about either you or it. The 'five regions' approach makes sense to me. (Although I'm somewhat disconcerted that Eagle Nest and Red River aren't in the same region!)
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