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Old 11-02-2010, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA - Kingstowne Subdivision
391 posts, read 484,168 times
Reputation: 361

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^There's no backlash from aab7855 thread. We are trying to explain the supply vs demand theory using New Orleans as the example. The main reason why uptown, lakeview, old metairie, warehouse district, mid-city, marigny, bywater, some parts of the East, algiers point, some parts of algiers, most of metairie are so expensive is because of demand. If people didn't make enough to pay their mortgages we would have something called foreclosures. We have less then 5% of the homes currently listed for sale are foreclosed in OP/JP. You may think that people don't make enough money but someone is getting paid. This isn't magic. Lafayette does not compare to NOLA. I'm sure you can't afford to live in Lafayette's exclusive, historical neighborhoods.

Regentrification is problem in any city. Not just New Orleans. I'm sure the government would love to hear your idea about a perfect development where homeless, poor, middle class, upper middle class and rich people can all live in the same area with great school system, walking distance to great attractions, low crime and affordable housing.
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Old 11-05-2010, 08:08 AM
 
16 posts, read 36,136 times
Reputation: 20
I've lived in NOLA my entire life and I agree the city has a bright future ahead. Tons of young professionals (unfortunately none in my field) are invading the city with a can-do spirit. Lots of liberals too so they are all into volunteering, etc. (I'm not a liberal and I don't volunteer but I admire those who do).

I agree it's way too expensive. I used to own in the hottest area (Warehouse District) but made the mistake of selling and now I can't afford to get back in. It's just as well b/c I need to move to a major corporate base (Atlanta most likely) to further my career.
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Old 11-05-2010, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Out in the Badlands
10,422 posts, read 9,101,907 times
Reputation: 7765
Quote:
Originally Posted by imaterry78259 View Post
Everyone I talk to who have been there in the last past year say that NOLA has a new positive vibe
But it is still under water(below sea level)
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Old 12-14-2010, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA - Kingstowne Subdivision
391 posts, read 484,168 times
Reputation: 361
rpmgatech - High property taxes and high property values go hand in hand. You can't increase one without the other. If we have such low compensation why do so many people continue to pay their mortgage and support one of the biggest restaurant industries in the country? We have a lot of tourist but we have a whole bunch of local who support these different industries.
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Old 12-14-2010, 12:01 PM
 
1,113 posts, read 1,990,702 times
Reputation: 830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pretzelogik View Post
But it is still under water(below sea level)

And San Fransisco is on a fault line and the MidWest gets a tornado and California could be slammed by a tsunami... Mt St Helen ring a bell?
Moderator cut: no copyrighted images allowed
so what is your point?

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 12-14-2010 at 12:10 PM..
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Old 12-18-2010, 08:48 AM
 
194 posts, read 490,724 times
Reputation: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by SacalaitWhisperer View Post
And San Fransisco is on a fault line and the MidWest gets a tornado and California could be slammed by a tsunami... Mt St Helen ring a bell?
Moderator cut: no copyrighted images allowed
so what is your point?
A large portion of The Netherlands is below sea level. They've just learned how to deal with it: article "Studies show without its sophisticated flood control system, an estimated 65 percent of the country would be submerged."
*********************************************

As far as improvements, etc...I've been here for eight months and I've seen more road repairs actually completed than I saw in Atlanta in several years. (Of course, Georgia is notoriously slow in that department.) I've seen many, many improvements of all kinds since my first visit here in April 2008. The vibe is incredibly upbeat, and people are, by and large, friendly and kind.

My husband and I are self-employed, in an arts-related field, and we brought our brand new business with us and have had nothing but success here. We've been able to rent a small but wonderful place to live and a separate workspace for our business. Now we're starting to look at houses and we plan to purchase sometime next year. We had been looking at houses in Atlanta when the "NOLA bug" bit us, and for our requirements, prices are about the same. (Small to medium house, safe area, inside the city - no suburbs, historic architecture, cosmetic fixer-upper.) Yes, insurance is higher, but property taxes are significantly lower, even with the proposed increase.

There also seem to be plenty of jobs in our "fall back" industry, the restaurant business. A lot of our favorite places are hiring, but fortunately we don't need "jobs". It's nice to know it's there, though.

I can see how a family with children, accustomed to a large suburban house, could feel frustration in wanting to move here. But, New Orleans is perfect for many people, and we feel like we've been welcomed with open arms.
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Old 12-19-2010, 06:06 PM
 
Location: "My Old Kentucky Home"
308 posts, read 537,748 times
Reputation: 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by rpmgatech View Post
NOLA seems to have a positive vibe ever since the Saints won the superbowl and Mitch Landrieu has replaced Ray "Chocolate City" Nagin. I hope the city turns around, being a former resident who can't move back because their aren't any jobs in my industry there. I have a love for New Orleans, so seeing it revamp the Saenger, Orpheum, etc. is great news. I just hope they have the money to do it without raising taxes too much (forcing out business), I pray that it isn't just talk, and I hope that all these changes are done soon enough so as to stop the bleeding off of the population and businesses in New Orleans.

Another thing that I think must happen (this is just my opinion, and I know some may disagree with this) is: people who moved to the North Shore (for good reason: cheap and less crime) from Lakeview and the surrounding areas need to get back to where they previously lived for tax purposes. Those were some great sources of revenue for Orleans Parish that would be greatly appreciated if they are added to the tax pool again. Also, due to the large growth of the North Shore since Katrina, St. Tammany is receiving more tax income, but they will also begin to experience some burdens that are introduced by this new population boom. As long as they can handle it properly when the negatives of a large population present themselves (in ~10 years), they should be fine.

Finally, I think New Orleans has to become more integrated. If you look at a map of New Orleans on a race basis, it is VERY segregated. Link here: Race and ethnicity: New Orleans | Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/walkingsf/4981408757/in/set-72157624812674967/ - broken link) This segregation is not a good thing, IMO.

Overall, I think the people who are positive about New Orleans' future are right. The future is bright for that great city, and with Landrieu in office, things are looking even brighter. I just hope that the action begins to follow the talk, because as all New Orleanians know, talk is cheap.

Go Saints!
God Bless New Orleans!
Well...I ain't got no dog in this race but, I'm glad to hear this Nagin guy is out of office. I remember him talking about the "Chocolate" this and "Chocolate" that...me being a white guy I didn't feel welcome and it just didn't set well with me. Why in the heck would a guy in his position say such a thing, even if he didn't want white people...dang he was the Mayor. I have always wanted to come down to New Orleans but, haven't at this point.

You all be looking for me, I sure want to try some of the food you folks are famous for.
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Old 12-19-2010, 06:25 PM
 
194 posts, read 490,724 times
Reputation: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiBall View Post
Well...I ain't got no dog in this race but, I'm glad to hear this Nagin guy is out of office. I remember him talking about the "Chocolate" this and "Chocolate" that...me being a white guy I didn't feel welcome and it just didn't set well with me. Why in the heck would a guy in his position say such a thing, even if he didn't want white people...dang he was the Mayor. I have always wanted to come down to New Orleans but, haven't at this point.

You all be looking for me, I sure want to try some of the food you folks are famous for.
Nagin was a big ol' goober - this is a blended city if there ever was one, and she "belongs" to all who love her.

Please come visit soon! Just make sure to look up online reviews before choosing where to eat. There are some a-mazing restaurants here, but also plenty of mediocre and just plain bad ones, especially in the tourist areas where they don't really depend on repeat business.

Oh, btw, it's "y'all", darlin'. Start practicing! (JK!)
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Old 12-19-2010, 06:36 PM
 
Location: "My Old Kentucky Home"
308 posts, read 537,748 times
Reputation: 144
Quote:
Originally Posted by thepointykitty View Post
Nagin was a big ol' goober - this is a blended city if there ever was one, and she "belongs" to all who love her.

Please come visit soon! Just make sure to look up online reviews before choosing where to eat. There are some a-mazing restaurants here, but also plenty of mediocre and just plain bad ones, especially in the tourist areas where they don't really depend on repeat business.

Oh, btw, it's "y'all", darlin'. Start practicing! (JK!)
Me being an old Kentucky boy...I know about "y'all" I was just trying to impress y'all.
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Old 12-19-2010, 07:05 PM
 
194 posts, read 490,724 times
Reputation: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiBall View Post
Me being an old Kentucky boy...I know about "y'all" I was just trying to impress y'all.
LMAO!! Please post on here when you get ready to visit. I learned so much on this forum before we moved, and most people on here are eager to help visitors have the best trip possible
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