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Old 12-14-2010, 12:06 PM
 
1,113 posts, read 1,991,330 times
Reputation: 830

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Quote:
A lot of kids take those opportunities for granted and throw them away.
Wow, imagine a kid making a bad choice. That never happens.

How about we shine some reality on the situation. Many kids today are spoiled brats with a cell phone glued to their face. I blame the lazy yuppie parents and television.

Go figure kids make bad choices about education... but then we are talking about Louisiana. We only beat out Mississippi from being the bottom of statistics.
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Old 12-14-2010, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Texas
55 posts, read 75,962 times
Reputation: 90
Default i should have started this topic

*cracks knuckles*

where do I start, there were at the time 3 kinda schools in New Orleans

1.private schools-(brother martin)all i know is these kids had rich parents
2.good schools- (Ben Franklin) you need good grades to be accepted here
3.bad schools-(JFK)(john mac) bad grades,no money you end up here

since my mom didn't make money and i didn't have good enough grades, I had to go to JFK (which i heard was a nice school in the 70's)

After walking through the double set of metal detectors and a bag check, I would go to my class were about 1/3 of the time the teacher was not there.
the class was full of students at the start of the year but near the end, half of them stopped coming to class... At the overcrowded lunchtime we ate like greenbeans and a cheese-sandwich, before a fight that was sure to take place broke out... then came time for P.E where we sat on the bleachers or played B-ball the whole year (my fingers got most of the exercise)as i wrote in my journal everyday for 45 mins instead... i would see groups of kids leaving the campus as the AP told students "if you don't want to be here, go home" of course getting home required the excellent use of public buses where kids from other schools got on the same packed buses. this lead to rival school fights (I can't tell you how many of those i saw).the old text books with bubble gum chewed in the 80"s, the dirty bathrooms and hallways...etc (A haunting exprience it was)

after the storm, i find myself at this school in Texas where *students get I.S.S for skipping class
*kids with school spirit wear Lettermen jackets
*when someone started failing a class the teachers encouraged them
*school plays and after-school clubs
*a variety of things things to eat for lunch
*restrooms and hallways the were cleaned daily
*yellow school buses that picked and dropped kids off at their homes

Had this school been in New Orleans i would have never been able to afford to come to school there...
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Old 12-14-2010, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,221 posts, read 2,130,123 times
Reputation: 1332
JFK... man that brings back memories. My older brother went to Jesuit... Kennedy kids, well the bad ones that you speak about anyway, used to terrorize people from other schools. They would jump Jesuit students who left campus early. Once a Jesuit kid had his jaw broken because he wouldn't buy a $1 raffle ticket being pushed by a JFK student. My brother's friends wanted to get even so they hid in the bushes one day near a bus stop and used one of their friends as "bait"; well once the group of JFK people they already knew as bad news showed up and sure enough started pushing around their boy something like 6 Jesuit guys jumped out of the bushes with bats, skateboards (as weapons), a machete, and one dude had a dead grenade attached to a metal chain!! They made a point to not clobber them but instead make it very clear verbally that there will be no more broken jaws or robberies of Jesuit kids.. haha it worked! Us Catholic school kids did what we had to do!

When you say that private schools are for "rich kids" you are often correct but the high schools affiliated with the Catholic diocese were relatively affordable ($3500 when my brother went through and only 3 years later it was $4500 for me!) and I knew many working class families who did whatever they had to do...work extra jobs, sell their car, anything to not put their kids in regular school. I had one buddy whose mother, a Guatemalan immigrant, became a secretary at a Lutheran elementary school in exchange for her 4 children going there K-8 for free.. like I said, whatever it took. The Catholic schools were usually good in giving financial aid as well. It's a real "chicken or the egg" situation when parents with any financial support continue to invest in private schools because they view most public options as inadequate, and then when public schools try to get it together they struggle because they lack a strong community base.. it's really sad. The magnet schools like Ben Franklin are too much pressure for many students..I know some who had nervous breakdowns during high school and had to leave. Plus being that they are selective admissions public schools, they tend to not be as helpful or nurturing because someone else could have your spot and you're not paying them to attend. Hopefully one day we will have even more successful public schools than we do after Katrina. And by the way, things have improved for the schools since the storm.

Last edited by aab7855; 12-14-2010 at 06:23 PM..
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Old 12-14-2010, 11:05 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
239 posts, read 550,883 times
Reputation: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by SacalaitWhisperer View Post
Wow, imagine a kid making a bad choice. That never happens.

How about we shine some reality on the situation. Many kids today are spoiled brats with a cell phone glued to their face. I blame the lazy yuppie parents and television.

Go figure kids make bad choices about education... but then we are talking about Louisiana. We only beat out Mississippi from being the bottom of statistics.
I think you misunderstood me. I was talking about the kids in NY. Basically, I was trying to make the point that education is what one makes of it and that no one has the right to brag or put others down simply because he or she went to high school in a state that is considered to have a better educational system.
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Old 12-15-2010, 07:16 PM
 
152 posts, read 436,768 times
Reputation: 72
Thanks Takezoe, that is the exact same sort of story I would hear from my ex.

BTW this wasn't intended as a thread to take shots at x or y school aab7855. Your comment is one I hear all too often in this city. Kids from x school did this to us so we did that back to them.

Also, although we agree that private schools were for rich kids, paying tuition was not an option for my family by any means. I have siblings close enough in age that the maximum financial burden, even $3500 would have put on my family per student, would have totaled at $10,500 a year. Absolutely not an option for my family. Even with scholarships I doubt we could have done it. Your buddies mothers position was a lucky deal, those sorts of openings are not available to every poor kids mom who wants her children to go to a private school.
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Old 12-15-2010, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,221 posts, read 2,130,123 times
Reputation: 1332
You want me to remove it then? I was painting a picture of how out of control things were being in school in the city... nothing other than that. I had tons of friends in public schools
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Old 12-15-2010, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Southwest Louisiana
2,878 posts, read 2,601,074 times
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Man all this talk about JFK, has got me going back to 2003 when some of their band members and my high schools band members got into it. It was after the first football game of the season. Damn, Damn, Damn!
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Old 12-19-2010, 08:44 PM
 
4,823 posts, read 6,317,133 times
Reputation: 9880
As a teacher, I was wondering, what exactly besides amping up the safety protocol, do you think your former teachers, administrators, school system should have done differently to have provided a better educational opportunity for you and other students.

This is not a defensive question, as an inner-city middle school teacher I'm always interested in ideas to make school better.
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Old 12-20-2010, 02:28 PM
 
152 posts, read 436,768 times
Reputation: 72
Bah I like that question teach. When it came to safety there are some major changes that could have taken place. I know that wasn't your question, but its a quick thought ill get out. I would liken the security protocol in my highschool to that of an institution. What I see sometimes is that when placed in a system of that nature most individuals will take on personality traits of their position. Ill look through my old intro to psych notes to see if I can find the study. It was don in the 70's I forget where. It delt with incarceration of individuals and documenting how their student and professor type personalities changed to those of either guards or inmates. Even more docile individuals, when placed into positions of authority such as th "prison guards", became rather assertive towards the inmates and so on. Anyway I think sme of the behavior problems result from the control protocol used to manage them. What I'm saying is what's the differene in being a "good kid" if you are still subject to "random" drugs checks in the middle of class by nopd with dogs and guns. If my memory serves me well, the assistant principal and several nopd officers would "drop in" during class. Even the teachers had no idea it was going to happen sometimes. Everyon stood immdiately and left the class in an orderly fashion laving all their things behind. One officer and dogs searched our things as we stood in line facing the same direction being searched with metal detectors and the other dog paraded back and forth infront just in case someone had something on them. If they found anything on a kid he/she would be ushered off to be processed and the rest of us would return to class. These situations do not spawn trust or intellectual curiousity and so forth. Simply they just reassure us that we were like prisoners or institutionalized.

Academic ideas now.

I woul say first an early and positive college prep counseling. One that would encourage and organize trips to universities for students who's families could not afford such things. Better information should be presented, not just made available, for financial aid options and the like.

I recall my academic pallette consisted of math, science, social studies, with afew other things peppered in. As we have posted earlier, I have heard of highschools offering programming classes, economics ac****ing finance type classes, sociology, etc. These were not just AP offerings but part of the standard curricula. Classes that can expand th students areas of interest and expose themm to things they could use or at least use to be better educated people without college.

Even a shop class would be appropriate. With most college degrees being practically worthless or worth as much as a highschool diploma, I feel some minor technical education may be usefull.

Arts and music appreciation, which does exist still I hope.

Some of these things may be addressed already with the changes that have occured. The question though involved what I would have liked. I remember taking a physics class in highschool. At the time I was interested in circuitry and electronics. I, on my own accord, acquired a college level intro to circuitry text book and read the entire thing in a months time. I had a few questions about some of the concepts and when we covered some similar stuff in physics I asked about them. However my teacher told me that the questions I had were too advanced for the rest of the class and that there wasnt enough time to cover them. I'm not sure if that story illustrates some of my frustrations, but to have had access to an advanced science class may have been benefitial. I'm sure other subjects may have been the same for other students. I was more of a math, sciences, and strangely arts guy.

I think clubs for these expansions are ok in schools, but they cannot take the place of an actual guided class. I think a more diverseset of classes and a more guided path through them in preparation for either real world application, or college is good.
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