U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Louisiana > New Orleans
 [Register]
New Orleans New Orleans - Metairie - Kenner metro area
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-29-2010, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Southwest Louisiana
2,881 posts, read 2,598,907 times
Reputation: 833

Advertisements

I actually don't mind gallery houses and creole cottages, in moderation. Again, I just don't like the brick choices that so many builders opt to use.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-29-2010, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
3,963 posts, read 6,862,775 times
Reputation: 1661
There is similar architecture in Mobile, Alabama with ironclad houses( there is a series on iron clade houses and buildings in Mobile) and several Creole cottages but I wouldn`t say they give nod or mimic N.O. I would say heritage play a role in that not mimicing.There are Creole neighberhoods that still have the original Creole firestations,schools,and churches .The Detonti,Church street and Oakleigh Historic districts in Mobile is full of Creole Cottages and the Fort De la Conde area has French architecture as well.Riviere Du Chien area is notable for having Creole cottages and Italianate style houses on the river front. All are well over 150 years old. The shot guns in the Camp Ground historic district trace back to being slave quarters.

Last edited by PortCity; 12-29-2010 at 09:01 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-29-2010, 11:45 PM
 
Location: Southwest Louisiana
2,881 posts, read 2,598,907 times
Reputation: 833
In the lake area, we have some shotgun houses, and alot of french country homes. There are some nods to the french quarter(still ironic considering that fq has more spanish architecture than french architecture). Like homes w/ courtyards that have wrought iron entries. Entrances w/ iron gates, w/ interesting designs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2010, 03:52 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 6,180,648 times
Reputation: 2978
Shotguns are pretty common outside of Louisiana, BTW. I know you can find them in Louisville and Lexington...especially in Louisville. Louisville probably got them from New Orleans since there was strong trading connections between the two cities (as well as a settlement of French-speakers from New Orleans in Louisville, probably come upriver due to this trade).

It would be interesting to know if upriver cities like Natchez, Vicksburg, and Memphis also have concentrations of this houseform (and perhaps others that originated in New Orleans).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2010, 06:55 AM
 
Location: City of Central
1,845 posts, read 3,793,597 times
Reputation: 949
The distinct architecture of the French Quarter seems to date from 1762 . Not really very old , all things considered . The town of Natchitoches is older than N.O. and was settled by the French as well and has some similar architecture . My point being , New Orleans is not as distinct and original as some would like to believe .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2010, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Southwest Louisiana
2,881 posts, read 2,598,907 times
Reputation: 833
You're right it isnt, but at the same time, it does kind of stand on it's own when compared to places like Houston, NYC, or Chicago. So it isn't as unique as some would like to believe as one would like to believe. What about Savannah, GA and Charleston, SC? Those are also unique southern cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2010, 09:11 AM
 
Location: City of Central
1,845 posts, read 3,793,597 times
Reputation: 949
Obviously N.O. does stand on it's own compared to Houston , Chicago , or NYC . You could say that about the community of Frogmore , La. as well . You're comparing apples to asparagus .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2010, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,213 posts, read 2,128,461 times
Reputation: 1325
What makes New Orleans unique though is the melange of Spanish, French and Creole architecture. Keep in mind fires have destroyed large swaths of the Quarter and different ideas and styles have been used to re-invent things. The 1762 date must've been after a fire when much had to be rebuilt, but the city was founded in 1718, only 4 years after Nachitoches. There are buildings older than 1762 in the mix. Actually several years ago some local attorneys were asked to legally settle a dispute between different architects and historians, some who believed that after the fire the French Quarter was Spanish architecture, others who believed it was French. The final decision was that is was neither in a pure form, but rather a hybrid unique in some of its architectural traits. When I was in Rome certain parts felt like I was in New Orleans as well, there's a lot more than just one source of ideas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2010, 06:55 PM
 
Location: City of Central
1,845 posts, read 3,793,597 times
Reputation: 949
Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
What makes New Orleans unique though is the melange of Spanish, French and Creole architecture. Keep in mind fires have destroyed large swaths of the Quarter and different ideas and styles have been used to re-invent things. The 1762 date must've been after a fire when much had to be rebuilt, but the city was founded in 1718, only 4 years after Nachitoches. There are buildings older than 1762 in the mix. Actually several years ago some local attorneys were asked to legally settle a dispute between different architects and historians, some who believed that after the fire the French Quarter was Spanish architecture, others who believed it was French. The final decision was that is was neither in a pure form, but rather a hybrid unique in some of its architectural traits.
Brush up on your N.O. history .
FrenchQuarter.com: Brief History of the French Quarter
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-30-2010, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,213 posts, read 2,128,461 times
Reputation: 1325
What specifically do I need to know? The first line says the city was founded in 1718. The only thing that happened in 1762 was a switching from French to Spanish. Yes, the fires came later, I did learn something there. Anything else?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Louisiana > New Orleans
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top