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Old 08-27-2014, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Anybody that thinks New Orleans is the "un-south" and moves for that reason will have quite a shock.
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neworleansisprettygood View Post
New Orleans up until around 1950 was the de facto "capital" of the South, but if you're thinking of southern belles sitting on their porches sipping sweet tea or mint juleps, no, that really isn't the thing here.
That's an interesting image. If someone were to describe that image, the very first thing I'd think would be, 'Georgia'...maybe to a lesser extent, 'South Carolina'

When I think 'New Orleans', my mind immediately rushes to music, trumpets, food, etc. Even when I think of 'Louisiana', it doesn't go to that image...it would go to perhaps Alligators, Swamps, Cajun, etc.
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
I've always seen Louisiana, more particularly New Orleans, consisting of a large Carioca mentality inside of a Baiano environment.
Wow, as a person who spent six months in Brazil, and spent time in both RIO & Bahia....simply WOW! Sounds like heaven!
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
That is a shame. Louisiana was the first place Filipinos were settling in. Some Filipinos escaped from Spanish galleons(The Philippines used to be the Spanish East Indies and alot of Filipinos have Spanish surnames for this reason and are Roman Catholic) and went to the swamps. There were other Filipino settlements, such as Manila Village in Barataria Bay, Alombro Canal and Camp Dewey in Plaquemines Parish. St. Malo is the oldest and Manila Village was the largest. Hurricanes did deal some nasty blows.

Plaquemines Parish in general is quite diverse in its own way. It was the gateway to New Orleans. Early in its history, you had the French, Islenos, African slaves, Italians, Croatians(Empire has one of the largest percentage of people with Croatian ancestry), Filipinos, and this was early on. There has also been immigration from Vietnam to Louisiana.

One thing that has scared me is that such an interesting culture, unlike anything in the South, could be lost.
Had to look up that town of Empire, Louisiana. Real small - 2,211 people in 2000, and 993 people in 2010.

The reference to a large Croat community made me interested in it.
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Old 08-27-2014, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Originally Posted by kleinberglowenstein View Post
I concur with Magicoz that the Philadelphia accent is an abomination. The locals can't say "the" correctly... it comes out sounding like "duh". Perhaps this can be traced to a European language (perhaps Italian) where the equivalent words for "the" mostly start with D? Here is a reason why we would all be better off if this accent died: I met a man at the Philly airport (I don't live in Philly) who told me he was once detained by airport security for this reason: he had some confusion about his flight, asked a receptionist, and she asked for his last name. His last name was "Allegrini" which in Italo-Philly speak sounds like "ALLAH-greeny". Now you are probably wondering why he almost got arrested. The TSA profiles people based on names which are similar to those of terrorists. Cat Stevens, now known as Yusuf Islam, was once confused with one of these wanted men.

Also, I don't mean to be racist or anything, but a lot of the people in Philadelphia are creepy. One fellow I met on my trip there (a recently retired Italian American) reminded me of the rapist/murderer played by Stanley Tucci from the movie The Lovely Bones, which took place in the Philly area. Maybe mustaches are not yet considered uncool in older Italo-American culture. The guy I met kept talking to himself too. Also, I can't stand the sense of humor that older white Philly people have. They always seem to have an attitude and are sarcastic about everything. Even the way they talk sounds whiny. And they are UNBELIEVABLY rude. An old lady at the airport (a total stranger) started arguing with me when I said no when she asked me to reserve a seat for her in the terminal. I was already busy and lost and that really was asking too much. And an old lady at the supermarket there pushed me out of her way. Didn't even say a word.
Funny...this is some good stuff. I'm interested in Philadelphia just as much as I am in New Orleans.

But, as I've been trying to get to know Philadelphia more, I see that kind of stuff. Particularly the sense of humor, the attitude and sarcastic. I still haven't been able to put my finger on it exactly, but you've given me a lot of stuff for thought on it!
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Old 08-27-2014, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Just the climate of New Orleans puts it in the south, no matter how different the culture.
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Old 08-29-2014, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
NO has a strong Frenchness about it, but where in the Northeast feels authentically "French"? It also has a good mix of, well, mixed race people's. When I think of a light-skinned mixed race Black Creoles, I don't think of NYC or the Northeast, I automatically think of Black Southern Belles like Beyonce quite honestly.

All in all, outside of the Italian population, and the Yat accent of the Whites that live there, NO doesn't really remind me of the Northeast. Take into account that it's predominantly Black, and the Blacks don't speak with the Yat.
Two questions!

What's a Yat accent?

Beyonce....Creoles...is that common in the Louisiana area? I mean that Creoles might have a Beyonce look?
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Old 08-29-2014, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Metairie, LA
1,087 posts, read 1,993,786 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Two questions!

What's a Yat accent?

Beyonce....Creoles...is that common in the Louisiana area? I mean that Creoles might have a Beyonce look?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpFDNTo4DNg
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Old 08-29-2014, 05:22 PM
 
86 posts, read 83,182 times
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New Orleans is a historical democratic city. If we disregard a few independents (with ties to the Democratic Party) it has seen Democratic mayors since 1872. It has to mention that Republicans were before the 1930 those who argued for tolerance and not Democrats. New Orleans is an historical progressive city in the sense that it was an outpost for “racial tolerance” in the very racist Deep South since it foundation in 1718. Under the slave-era, whites, mulattos and blacks could intermix and socialize freely in New Orleans, which was not possible in most of Southern United States. New Orleans is not Jackson, Mississippi but is also not New York, Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Portland, Minneapolis, Chicago, San Diego, Washington DC or any other liberal or progressive metropolis. Once upon a time New Orleans was the New York of the South. It was a multicultural, cosmopolitan, aristocratic city with deep ties to the old colonial powers (in particular France) and their colonies in the West Indies. Today, New Orleans is a 60 percent black city. A third is white and the rest is Latinos and Asians. French was abolished in schools after the civil war and many of the old white French aristocrats took their colored wives and returned to France. The only “French colonial culture” that is left in New Orleans is the French Quarters and maybe a few surrounding neighborhoods. New Orleans is nothing like Montreal and Quebec or historical French colonies that still exist.

In my view New Orleans has a great dense downtown but it also a city stricken with poverty, crime and social injustice and you noticed it even when you are a tourist. I cannot say I enjoyed all the tourists and there are plenty of them in downtown New Orleans. The weather is extremely humid and uncomfortable under the summer. It is also a pretty dirty town (not the downtown because New Orleans lives on tourist and therefore keep it clean) and in particular areas just outside the downtown. The Katrina-Hurricane in 2005 did add some new job-opportunities (someone has to rebuild the city) but the unemployment-rate (just as in the rest of United States) continued to be high. For a person with a college degree - New Orleans is not the right place. Most jobs in New Orleans are just above minimum-wage jobs within the tourist-industry and they are seasonally. Housing in New Orleans is rather expensive comparing to the medium-income. Housing is expensive because it has been driven up by tourists. In my humble opinion I think New Orleans is a “most do” for any tourist but live there? It is like living in a crime-stricken and poor Las Vegas with some history and cool neighborhoods so I don’t understand why New Orleans is so romanticize.
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Old 08-29-2014, 05:43 PM
 
53,285 posts, read 48,430,536 times
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Had to look up that town of Empire, Louisiana. Real small - 2,211 people in 2000, and 993 people in 2010.

The reference to a large Croat community made me interested in it.
I was talking in terms of percentage.
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