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Old 01-22-2012, 09:51 PM
 
172 posts, read 348,849 times
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Does Rite Aid (who of course bought K&B) sell a lot of groceries, (not K&B) ice cream among them, in New Orleans? I thought they might because of the lack of supermarkets.
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Old 01-22-2012, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,301 posts, read 2,204,178 times
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I don't think Rite Aid/CVS/Walgreen's (the only franchise drug stores) sell more groceries than they would in another city, grocery stores are common enough in New Orleans. Where did you live/are you from magicoz? I definitely don't mean any disrespect by this but your posts would indicate to me that you've visited/read about New Orleans but never lived there.
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Old 01-22-2012, 10:17 PM
 
172 posts, read 348,849 times
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I was born in Houston to a family from Philadelphia, moved to the latter at an early age, and now want to move to New Orleans. Also, not to be rude but Rite Aid is not a "franchise". It is just a chain. A franchise is a chain business that is split into local chapters, where each location or group of locations is run by a certain individual or family.
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Old 01-23-2012, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
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Noted. Thank you, I don't consider that rude. Either way, the drug stores in the city I don't think serve the role that our beloved KB did...there is no rite aid brand beer for example, haha. I would say even if Popeye's isn't as good as ya mama's house, there's nothing wrong with it and it gives a decent view of some of our cuisine. Heck, most natives live off of it during Mardi Gras. I can't tell you if the flavor differs out of state...I don't think the places out of state have items like etouffee and seafood poboys do they? My assumption is that is the menu differs in Louisiana.
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Old 01-23-2012, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,433 posts, read 20,920,354 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
Noted. Thank you, I don't consider that rude. Either way, the drug stores in the city I don't think serve the role that our beloved KB did...there is no rite aid brand beer for example, haha. I would say even if Popeye's isn't as good as ya mama's house, there's nothing wrong with it and it gives a decent view of some of our cuisine. Heck, most natives live off of it during Mardi Gras. I can't tell you if the flavor differs out of state...I don't think the places out of state have items like etouffee and seafood poboys do they? My assumption is that is the menu differs in Louisiana.
They have the poboys here. Popeyes has etouffee?
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Old 01-23-2012, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
19,083 posts, read 28,400,412 times
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Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
They have the poboys here. Popeyes has etouffee?
Popeyes been serving etoufee for a while.
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Old 01-23-2012, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Popeyes been serving etoufee for a while.
Well it's not my favorite so I'm not surprised I missed it.
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Old 01-23-2012, 02:37 PM
 
53,965 posts, read 48,761,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Many similarities between the two, both historically and modern.
European, African, and indigenous roots are what Louisiana shares with Brazil, though in different ways. In Brazil, the Portuguese(and to a smaller extent, the Dutch) colonized Brazil. The French(and later the Spanish, and then the French again) colonized Louisiana. The indigenous peoples are different, and both have had their influences in both places. Both places have strong African influences. In New Orleans, African traditions survived through Congo Square, where slaves were allowed to play their drums. African and European influences gave birth to jazz. In Brazil, African roots have remained even stronger, as African slaves in Brazil kept some of their African customs. Bossa nova is similar(but different) to jazz and evolved from samba. Samba has African roots

Both places grow sugar cane and sugar cane was a major part of the economy. Slaves in Brazil were harvesting the sugar cane. Many slaves in Louisiana were harvesting sugar cane.

The food has some similar, although somewhat different influences. Louisiana's cuisine has French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, African, and indigenous elements. In Louisiana, there is a dish called shrimp Creole, which has tomatoes, onion, celery and bell pepper,Tabasco sauce, and of course, the shrimp. It is served with rice.
Food in Brazil has Portuguese, African, German, Italian, indigenous, and Spanish influences. Like Louisiana, rice in an important part of the cuisine. In northeast Brazil, shrimp and shellfish are important elements of the cuisine.
In Brazil, Italian immigrants came up with the mortadella sandwich. In New Orleans, Italian immigrants came up with the muffaletta.
The African influences in the food are evident in both places. In Louisiana, gumbo is a big part of the cuisine. Nkombo means okra, and okra is the ingredient for gumbo. It is a West African influence.
Red beans and rice are a staple in Lousiana, not unlike the Brazilian dish feijoada, made from beans, rice, and the economy cuts of meat.

Before Louisiana became part of the USA, the races mixed alot. In Louisiana, there was something called a placage. Rich French men in Louisiana would go to quadroon balls and "placees", quadroon women(women mixed with European and African ancestry) would be placed with them. Some of these men kept these women as their mistresses. In Louisiana today, there are many people who have mixed ancestry. My mother is from Louisiana and I have some French Creole, African, Irish, and Native American ancestry. Before the Louisiana Purchase, Louisiana had a society not unlike Brazil, with a three-tiered society. You have mixed-race people, Europeans, and Africans.
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Old 01-23-2012, 02:52 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,414,747 times
Reputation: 1418
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
European, African, and indigenous roots are what Louisiana shares with Brazil, though in different ways. In Brazil, the Portuguese(and to a smaller extent, the Dutch) colonized Brazil. The French(and later the Spanish, and then the French again) colonized Louisiana. The indigenous peoples are different, and both have had their influences in both places. Both places have strong African influences. In New Orleans, African traditions survived through Congo Square, where slaves were allowed to play their drums. African and European influences gave birth to jazz. In Brazil, African roots have remained even stronger, as African slaves in Brazil kept some of their African customs. Bossa nova is similar(but different) to jazz and evolved from samba. Samba has African roots

Both places grow sugar cane and sugar cane was a major part of the economy. Slaves in Brazil were harvesting the sugar cane. Many slaves in Louisiana were harvesting sugar cane.

The food has some similar, although somewhat different influences. Louisiana's cuisine has French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, African, and indigenous elements. In Louisiana, there is a dish called shrimp Creole, which has tomatoes, onion, celery and bell pepper,Tabasco sauce, and of course, the shrimp. It is served with rice.
Food in Brazil has Portuguese, African, German, Italian, indigenous, and Spanish influences. Like Louisiana, rice in an important part of the cuisine. In northeast Brazil, shrimp and shellfish are important elements of the cuisine.
In Brazil, Italian immigrants came up with the mortadella sandwich. In New Orleans, Italian immigrants came up with the muffaletta.
The African influences in the food are evident in both places. In Louisiana, gumbo is a big part of the cuisine. Nkombo means okra, and okra is the ingredient for gumbo. It is a West African influence.
Red beans and rice are a staple in Lousiana, not unlike the Brazilian dish feijoada, made from beans, rice, and the economy cuts of meat.

Before Louisiana became part of the USA, the races mixed alot. In Louisiana, there was something called a placage. Rich French men in Louisiana would go to quadroon balls and "placees", quadroon women(women mixed with European and African ancestry) would be placed with them. Some of these men kept these women as their mistresses. In Louisiana today, there are many people who have mixed ancestry. My mother is from Louisiana and I have some French Creole, African, Irish, and Native American ancestry. Before the Louisiana Purchase, Louisiana had a society not unlike Brazil, with a three-tiered society. You have mixed-race people, Europeans, and Africans.
I've always seen Louisiana, more particularly New Orleans, consisting of a large Carioca mentality inside of a Baiano environment.
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Old 01-23-2012, 02:56 PM
 
53,965 posts, read 48,761,930 times
Reputation: 16793
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Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
I've always seen Louisiana, more particularly New Orleans, consisting of a large Carioca mentality inside of a Baiano environment.
That is similar to how I see New Orleans, and Louisiana, in general, comes off as more Latin in feel than most places.
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