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Old 01-25-2012, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Da Parish
1,127 posts, read 4,633,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
I've been to New Orleans, so I could understand. I have family there.

Interesting that you mention Puerto Rico. There are a group of people in Louisiana called Islenos. They are the descendants of people who immigrated from the Canary Islands of Spain. Some still speak Spanish. The Spanish that they speak sounds somewhat similar to Spanish spoken in Puerto Rico.
They sound Cajun to me, well except that they aren't speaking Cajun French. It always freaks me out when I go to the festival or some other "down da road" function and I find myself asking myself, "Geez what are all these Cajuns doing here?" You can hear the accent here, Los Islenos Heritage and Cultural Society's losislenos.org Website. The guy sounds like my relatives over in Thibodaux. There is a festival every year. I adore the Sangria and these bacon/banana/shrimp things that are heaven. The festival is a great place to have lunch, and it's only about sixteen miles away from the French Quarter. Ya know I gotta talk up Da Parish when I can.

See that man carving those ducks? My Daddy used to do that; makes me miss my Dad.

Last edited by Drouzin; 01-25-2012 at 08:47 AM..
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Old 01-25-2012, 09:12 AM
 
2,816 posts, read 5,611,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magicoz View Post
Actually Haiti is not "Francophone", but it is an ex-French colony. Haitians speak Creole which is an African language, not a dialect of French. Martinique and Guadeloupe are both still French colonies and yes they are Francophone.
I'm afraid you're wrong on two accounts:

1) Although Creole has official language status in Haiti, linguistically is a dialect of French, as are Louisiana's Creole and Cajun dialects

2) French is Haiti's official language along with Creole and is the language of Government, newspapers, etc...
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Old 01-25-2012, 09:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drouzin View Post
They sound Cajun to me, well except that they aren't speaking Cajun French. It always freaks me out when I go to the festival or some other "down da road" function and I find myself asking myself, "Geez what are all these Cajuns doing here?" You can hear the accent here, Los Islenos Heritage and Cultural Society's losislenos.org Website. The guy sounds like my relatives over in Thibodaux. There is a festival every year. I adore the Sangria and these bacon/banana/shrimp things that are heaven. The festival is a great place to have lunch, and it's only about sixteen miles away from the French Quarter. Ya know I gotta talk up Da Parish when I can.

See that man carving those ducks? My Daddy used to do that; makes me miss my Dad.
What I meant by similar is that the I notice stuff, such as the "s" being dropped in some words.

THE CANARY ISLANDERS IN LOUISIANA. LOUISIANA, SAINT BERNARD. NEW ORLEANS. DELACROIX ISLAND - YouTube
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Old 01-25-2012, 09:20 AM
 
2,816 posts, read 5,611,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
What I meant by similar is that the I notice stuff, such as the "s" being dropped in some words.

THE CANARY ISLANDERS IN LOUISIANA. LOUISIANA, SAINT BERNARD. NEW ORLEANS. DELACROIX ISLAND - YouTube
Indeed, green_mariner, the Canary Islands dialect is similar to Puerto Rican and Cuban accents. That's because many of the first Spanish settlers in those islands were from the Canaries, and later on, in the 19th century, there was a big wave of Canarian immigration to those islands.
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Old 01-25-2012, 10:03 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Geography Freak View Post
Indeed, green_mariner, the Canary Islands dialect is similar to Puerto Rican and Cuban accents. That's because many of the first Spanish settlers in those islands were from the Canaries, and later on, in the 19th century, there was a big wave of Canarian immigration to those islands.
Similar, and yet different. With Puerto Rico and Cuba, they were completely colonized by Spain for so long and the Spanish culture was the big part of those places. With Louisiana, it was colonized by Spain, but only for a short time. With so much French influence, when the Canary Islanders came, their Spanish language stayed, but there were influences from Cajun culture. The Spanish is very distinct. Some of the people sound Cajun when speaking Spanish, but the general Canary Island dialect is there and the same as you would find in Cuba and Puerto Rico. The main reason for coming was for the sugar cane harvests.
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Old 01-25-2012, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,866 posts, read 58,428,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drouzin View Post
They sound Cajun to me, well except that they aren't speaking Cajun French. It always freaks me out when I go to the festival or some other "down da road" function and I find myself asking myself, "Geez what are all these Cajuns doing here?" You can hear the accent here, Los Islenos Heritage and Cultural Society's losislenos.org Website. The guy sounds like my relatives over in Thibodaux. There is a festival every year. I adore the Sangria and these bacon/banana/shrimp things that are heaven. The festival is a great place to have lunch, and it's only about sixteen miles away from the French Quarter. Ya know I gotta talk up Da Parish when I can.

See that man carving those ducks? My Daddy used to do that; makes me miss my Dad.
What bacon/banana /shrimp thing? Never ran into that but now I'm hungry!

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Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 01-25-2012 at 07:07 PM..
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Old 01-25-2012, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Da Parish
1,127 posts, read 4,633,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geography Freak View Post
Indeed, green_mariner, the Canary Islands dialect is similar to Puerto Rican and Cuban accents. That's because many of the first Spanish settlers in those islands were from the Canaries, and later on, in the 19th century, there was a big wave of Canarian immigration to those islands.
Lol, well yeah when they are speaking Spanish they don't sound Cajun, but most of the time when I run into them at the store and such, they are speaking English and sound like Cajuns. As far as dialect in Spanish, I wouldn't know Mexican, from Cuba, from Panama, my poor Spanish teacher gave up on me halfway through the semester.

You know SouthernBelle, I wish I knew what it was called, it's really simple, take a slice of plantain, (hubby says it's a plantain and not a banana), a shrimp, put them together and then wrap them with bacon. Use a toothpick to hold it all together and bake or broil, (not sure). It's usually served with the sampler/combo platter, but last year they left off the shrimp, (please bring back the shrimp, it's better with the shrimp). The closest I can come to what it is called was, Plantain Mofongo with Shrimp, but without the mofongo sauce.

Last edited by Drouzin; 01-25-2012 at 07:12 PM..
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Old 01-25-2012, 07:56 PM
 
53,285 posts, read 48,430,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drouzin View Post
Lol, well yeah when they are speaking Spanish they don't sound Cajun, but most of the time when I run into them at the store and such, they are speaking English and sound like Cajuns. As far as dialect in Spanish, I wouldn't know Mexican, from Cuba, from Panama, my poor Spanish teacher gave up on me halfway through the semester.

You know SouthernBelle, I wish I knew what it was called, it's really simple, take a slice of plantain, (hubby says it's a plantain and not a banana), a shrimp, put them together and then wrap them with bacon. Use a toothpick to hold it all together and bake or broil, (not sure). It's usually served with the sampler/combo platter, but last year they left off the shrimp, (please bring back the shrimp, it's better with the shrimp). The closest I can come to what it is called was, Plantain Mofongo with Shrimp, but without the mofongo sauce.
I think mofongo is the closest thing I can come up with. It's a Puerto Rican dish.
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Old 01-25-2012, 10:49 PM
 
172 posts, read 347,822 times
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Does anyone really know why there are both rhotic and non-rhotic dialects? I don't get how two completely different sounds for the same letter could have evolved in the same language. But I guess I'm not really intellectual enough to understand the philosophy behind language. Once I heard a non-rhotic person get confused because he thought someone said "artistic" instead of "autistic".
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Old 01-26-2012, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Da Parish
1,127 posts, read 4,633,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
I think mofongo is the closest thing I can come up with. It's a Puerto Rican dish.
Perhaps there is a Puerto Rican/Islenos connection? There is also a Filipino influence in lower St. Bernard. Saint Malo was the first Filipino settlement in what is now the US. Hubby works with a couple of Isleno/Filipino guys. It's a shame, but back when I was in school the Islenos and Filipinos of St. Bernard were barely touched upon in LA history. Between Betsy and Katrina both communities have taken quite a blow.
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