U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Louisiana > New Orleans
 [Register]
New Orleans New Orleans - Metairie - Kenner metro area
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-14-2012, 10:03 PM
 
172 posts, read 347,514 times
Reputation: 49

Advertisements

Why are A&P and Albertsons gone? I am surprised by the lack of those chains and Safeway, Kroger, etc. Grocery prices here worry me. Rouses seems to own the only decent stores at all in this area (I don't live here but may move here) and judging by their French Quarter store, their prices are rather high.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-14-2012, 10:56 PM
 
141 posts, read 255,210 times
Reputation: 113
Its called Wally World. Businesses cease to exist when they cannot make a sustainable profit. The 6 Walton heirs have more wealth than the bottom 30% bracket in the entire USA. That says something BIG.

Six Walton Heirs Have More Wealth than the Bottom 30% of Americans
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2012, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,482,523 times
Reputation: 4551
Quote:
Originally Posted by polizzio View Post
Its called Wally World. Businesses cease to exist when they cannot make a sustainable profit. The 6 Walton heirs have more wealth than the bottom 30% bracket in the entire USA. That says something BIG.

Six Walton Heirs Have More Wealth than the Bottom 30% of Americans
Yeah it sucks but this is true. Oklahoma City lost nearly all of its grocery stores after Wal-Mart saturated the area with supercenters. When given the choice, most people will choose Wal-Mart because of lower price.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2012, 07:47 AM
 
141 posts, read 255,210 times
Reputation: 113
And I do 95% of my grocery shopping there too, because of the low prices. But think of all the mom and pop hardware stores and grocery stores put out of business in the last 25 years by the likes of WM, home depot, and lowes. Their putting hurt on many of the larger chain grocery stores too. One day WM/Sams will totally control our grocery shopping, then it will be really interesting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Destrehan, Louisiana
2,192 posts, read 6,409,323 times
Reputation: 3629
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Yeah it sucks but this is true. Oklahoma City lost nearly all of its grocery stores after Wal-Mart saturated the area with supercenters. When given the choice, most people will choose Wal-Mart because of lower price.

This is not always true. I can find things cheaper at other stores. And the quality of meat ay Wal Mart is not as good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2012, 02:50 PM
 
Location: USA
2,815 posts, read 6,928,588 times
Reputation: 1965
Walmart is definitely to blame. But you can't blame people for not wanting to pay a premium price for groceries. Frankly, I can't stand the crowds and the slow check-outs at WM so I don't shop there for that reason. My sanity is more important than savings
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2012, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,343 posts, read 20,775,930 times
Reputation: 9223
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
Walmart is definitely to blame. But you can't blame people for not wanting to pay a premium price for groceries. Frankly, I can't stand the crowds and the slow check-outs at WM so I don't shop there for that reason. My sanity is more important than savings
That's a really good point. I hate going to Wolly World because it's always packed and most of the registers are empty. I don't see why they have them in the first place, they should do like Target and only have a few. I like going to Kroger, HEB, or any other store..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2012, 06:36 PM
 
172 posts, read 347,514 times
Reputation: 49
Compared to 20-50 years ago, grocery stores now do have a lot more "bells and whistles" than before, but if you think the big chains are "expensive" then I feel sorry for you. Nevertheless, many big cities have a significant portion of their population on food stamps. A lot of poor and minority areas (all over the USA) don't have any grocery stores due to shoplifting, even though there are chain drugstores on every corner. But different chain store units have different levels of security depending on the neighborhood. For example, in most of New Orleans, the cigarettes, booze, and even baby formula are kept in a locked case.

I used to live in The Woodlands Texas (one of the only big suburbs of Houston) and in the 80's, it had a shopping center with a Kroger at one end and a Wal-Mart/Walmart at the other. But in the very early 90's, Wal-Mart/Walmart moved across the street to a bigger store. The Kmart that was almost directly next to the "old" store, and was directly across from the new store, quickly closed. In the 2000s, the Wal-Mart/Walmart moved again, this time to a Supercenter, and sure enough the Kroger (which had NEVER been updated since 1984) closed within a year. I also credit the arrival of a brand new Supercenter in Coatesville, Pennsylvania (near where I live now) about 10 years ago to the death of the nearby Acme supermarket. Acme is a big chain based in Philly that has a long history, but this particular store was a VERY outdated 60's model, so its closing wasn't too surprising. And it was very far from the next closest Acme location. Older Acmes are/were beautiful though. There are several websites dedicated to their memory. Acme years ago was like Philadelphia's own version of A&P, which was a New York chain and their biggest competitor. Food Fair (later called Pantry Pride) and Penn Fruit were two other unique Philly chains. All four companies had really nice architectural trademarks for their stores. Acme used to be all over PA, NJ, NY (EXCEPT for NYC), DE, MD, and the VA suburbs of DC, but is now restricted to the official Philly metro area with a few exceptions. I am amazed at how many of their old buildings are still standing long after Acme left other towns. A&P was all over the South and Northeast long ago. Food Fair (which in their later years used the name Pantry Pride, bought Penn Fruit, and paired their stores with JM Fields big-box stores) dotted the East Coast from Florida to Maine. Penn Fruit's stores were almost all in Philadelphia itself, but Delaware County was a huge market for them. They had only one or two stores each in Montgomery County PA, New Jersey, and Delaware. The farthest unit from headquarters was a store all by itself in Allentown.

Last edited by magicoz; 01-15-2012 at 07:22 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2012, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,343 posts, read 20,775,930 times
Reputation: 9223
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicoz View Post
Compared to 20-50 years ago, grocery stores now do have a lot more "bells and whistles" than before, but if you think the big chains are "expensive" then I feel sorry for you. Nevertheless, many big cities have a significant portion of their population on food stamps. A lot of poor and minority areas (all over the USA) don't have any grocery stores due to shoplifting, even though there are chain drugstores on every corner. But different chain store units have different levels of security depending on the neighborhood. For example, in most of New Orleans, the cigarettes, booze, and even baby formula are kept in a locked case.

I used to live in The Woodlands Texas (one of the only big suburbs of Houston) and in the 80's, it had a shopping center with a Kroger at one end and a Wal-Mart/Walmart at the other. But in the very early 90's, Wal-Mart/Walmart moved across the street to a bigger store. The Kmart that was almost directly next to the "old" store, and was directly across from the new store, quickly closed. In the 2000s, the Wal-Mart/Walmart moved again, this time to a Supercenter, and sure enough the Kroger (which had NEVER been updated since 1984) closed within a year. I also credit the arrival of a brand new Supercenter in Coatesville, Pennsylvania (near where I live now) about 10 years ago to the death of the nearby Acme supermarket. Acme is a big chain based in Philly that has a long history, but this particular store was a VERY outdated 60's model, so its closing wasn't too surprising. And it was very far from the next closest Acme location. Older Acmes are/were beautiful though. There are several websites dedicated to their memory. Acme years ago was like Philadelphia's own version of A&P, which was a New York chain and their biggest competitor. Food Fair (later called Pantry Pride) and Penn Fruit were two other unique Philly chains. All four companies had really nice architectural trademarks for their stores. Acme used to be all over PA, NJ, NY (EXCEPT for NYC), DE, MD, and the VA suburbs of DC, but is now restricted to the official Philly metro area with a few exceptions. I am amazed at how many of their old buildings are still standing long after Acme left other towns. A&P was all over the South and Northeast long ago. Food Fair (which in their later years used the name Pantry Pride, bought Penn Fruit, and paired their stores with JM Fields big-box stores) dotted the East Coast from Florida to Maine. Penn Fruit's stores were almost all in Philadelphia itself, but Delaware County was a huge market for them. They had only one or two stores each in Montgomery County PA, New Jersey, and Delaware.
Pearland, Sugarland, Humble, Cypress, Pasadena, League City, Mo City, Spring, and Katy?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2012, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,866 posts, read 58,371,867 times
Reputation: 19202
Folks please keep to topic, which is lack of independent stores in New Orleans.
__________________
Moderator for Utah, Salt Lake City, Diabetes, Cancer, Pets forums
//www.city-data.com/forumtos.html

Realtors are welcome here but do see our Realtor Advice to avoid infractions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Louisiana > New Orleans
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:49 PM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top