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Old 05-11-2020, 11:01 PM
 
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What is the cultural presence of Latinos in New Orleans, if any?
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Old 05-12-2020, 02:13 AM
 
Location: DMV Area/NYC/Honolulu
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I haven't lived in New Orleans since 2014 so can't answer recently, but there definitely was a Latino presence. One of my favorite places to eat was at the Ideal Market (the hot food bar was to die for). At the time, the Latino cultural impact wasn't very big, though I can't say if it has changed since then.
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Old 05-12-2020, 03:48 AM
 
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Pre-Katrina or Post-Katrina?
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Old 05-17-2020, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
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Plenty, plenty, plenty. Hondurans have been there since the 1950s, mostly as middle men for trade. United Fruit used to be headquartered in New Orleans, and for a while there all bananas consumed in the US went through the port. Some Cubans, Venezuelans and some other Central American ethnicities in addition to Hondurans have also been there for decades (mostly well off people). From the fifties up until the early 2000s, St. Paul´s in Covington (about an hour from New Orleans) had a boarding program where rich Central American families sent their sons off to be educated Stateside...the connections to Central America are deep.

Katrina definitely brought waves of new, mostly undocumented workers into New Orleans. It also equalized the situation in terms of demographics, with many Mexicans coming and at least in the city limits it seems like they´re about even with Hondurans in terms of numbers now. The suburbs are even more Hispanic; there are schools in Metairie and Kenner that are majority Hispanic....less so on the West Bank, but "less" could still be 40% in some of the schools on the other side of the river. There are even a few Brazilians in the mix.

Tulane and especially Loyola have always had (wealthy) Latin American students, mostly from Puerto Rico and Central America.

Two things seem to be lacking though from the community...real integration and a healthy middle class. When my wife and I go visit (we live in Colombia, I´m a gringo and she´s Colombian and very "latina" looking), a lot of the day laborer types and their families look very puzzled to see us together, because the uber rich Hispanics would probably be speaking English with their "gring@" significant other, and they´d probably not even give their social class the time of day, whereas we enjoy going to their taquerías and markets and all that. I used to volunteer teach English at a church in Mid City (definitely the most heavily Hispanic neighborhood in New Orleans proper) and all the people would tell me how welcome they felt, how tolerant the city was, etc....but that their lack of English and the locals´ lack of Spanish was still a barrier. At least, they said, it wasn´t like _____ (usually a rural area in the South or Midwest) where the locals gave them dirty looks and often made them feel uneasy.

Slowly but surely though, the community will leave a bigger mark. There´s even a Mardi Gras krewe now, the Krewe of Mayahuel, that dresses up in Aztec warrior and Day of the Dead gear and marches through the streets during Carnival time. Latinos are sprinkling yet another flavor on top of New Orleans´ multicultural, historically immigrant landscape.

Last edited by aab7855; 05-17-2020 at 07:20 PM..
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Old 05-20-2020, 12:54 AM
 
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Thank you so much for the detailed response. You’re very insightful. I would have never guessed the ties with Central America were that present. I can’t wait to visit one day. The city has always intrigued me!
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Old 05-20-2020, 12:56 AM
 
6 posts, read 1,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mindraker View Post
Pre-Katrina or Post-Katrina?
I was more so thinking post Katrina...
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Old 05-20-2020, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,295 posts, read 2,197,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caligal2012 View Post
Thank you so much for the detailed response. You’re very insightful. I would have never guessed the ties with Central America were that present. I can’t wait to visit one day. The city has always intrigued me!
No problem. Feel free to message me if you want more specific tips. Honduran food is out of this world by the way.
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Old 06-10-2020, 09:12 AM
 
684 posts, read 414,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
Plenty, plenty, plenty. Hondurans have been there since the 1950s, mostly as middle men for trade. United Fruit used to be headquartered in New Orleans, and for a while there all bananas consumed in the US went through the port. Some Cubans, Venezuelans and some other Central American ethnicities in addition to Hondurans have also been there for decades (mostly well off people). From the fifties up until the early 2000s, St. Paul´s in Covington (about an hour from New Orleans) had a boarding program where rich Central American families sent their sons off to be educated Stateside...the connections to Central America are deep.

Katrina definitely brought waves of new, mostly undocumented workers into New Orleans. It also equalized the situation in terms of demographics, with many Mexicans coming and at least in the city limits it seems like they´re about even with Hondurans in terms of numbers now. The suburbs are even more Hispanic; there are schools in Metairie and Kenner that are majority Hispanic....less so on the West Bank, but "less" could still be 40% in some of the schools on the other side of the river. There are even a few Brazilians in the mix.

Tulane and especially Loyola have always had (wealthy) Latin American students, mostly from Puerto Rico and Central America.

Two things seem to be lacking though from the community...real integration and a healthy middle class. When my wife and I go visit (we live in Colombia, I´m a gringo and she´s Colombian and very "latina" looking), a lot of the day laborer types and their families look very puzzled to see us together, because the uber rich Hispanics would probably be speaking English with their "gring@" significant other, and they´d probably not even give their social class the time of day, whereas we enjoy going to their taquerías and markets and all that. I used to volunteer teach English at a church in Mid City (definitely the most heavily Hispanic neighborhood in New Orleans proper) and all the people would tell me how welcome they felt, how tolerant the city was, etc....but that their lack of English and the locals´ lack of Spanish was still a barrier. At least, they said, it wasn´t like _____ (usually a rural area in the South or Midwest) where the locals gave them dirty looks and often made them feel uneasy.

Slowly but surely though, the community will leave a bigger mark. There´s even a Mardi Gras krewe now, the Krewe of Mayahuel, that dresses up in Aztec warrior and Day of the Dead gear and marches through the streets during Carnival time. Latinos are sprinkling yet another flavor on top of New Orleans´ multicultural, historically immigrant landscape.
This is a little surprising to me..was under the impression that the NO Latino population was still overwhelmingly Honduran. Any links with numbers?
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Old 06-10-2020, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,295 posts, read 2,197,212 times
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https://www.datacenterresearch.org/d...w-orleans-now/

"In 2018, the largest Hispanic group in metro New Orleans was Honduran, representing 29 percent of the Hispanic population. In comparison, Hondurans represent only 2 percent of the national Hispanic population. These figures point to metro New Orleans as a hub of Honduran migration.

Not to be ignored, the Mexican population represents 20 percent of the Hispanic population in metro New Orleans. Nevertheless, the Mexican population is much less prominent in the metro than nationally, where it represents 62 percent of the Hispanic population."

You wonder how documented vs undocumented maybe causes the numbers to vary on paper compared to reality...

Also, note that Orleans Parish is more Mexican than Honduran, and Jefferson is more Honduran than Mexican.

Last edited by aab7855; 06-10-2020 at 03:09 PM..
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Old 06-15-2020, 08:11 AM
 
684 posts, read 414,834 times
Reputation: 934
Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
https://www.datacenterresearch.org/d...w-orleans-now/

"In 2018, the largest Hispanic group in metro New Orleans was Honduran, representing 29 percent of the Hispanic population. In comparison, Hondurans represent only 2 percent of the national Hispanic population. These figures point to metro New Orleans as a hub of Honduran migration.

Not to be ignored, the Mexican population represents 20 percent of the Hispanic population in metro New Orleans. Nevertheless, the Mexican population is much less prominent in the metro than nationally, where it represents 62 percent of the Hispanic population."

You wonder how documented vs undocumented maybe causes the numbers to vary on paper compared to reality...

Also, note that Orleans Parish is more Mexican than Honduran, and Jefferson is more Honduran than Mexican.
Good ish mane.
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