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Old 01-14-2021, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Louisiana to Houston to Denver to NOVA
16,508 posts, read 26,308,869 times
Reputation: 13293

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo_1 View Post
We can agree to disagree. I was just trying to point out some positive developments I see happening in the city (you know, cause I actually live here). But I guess that's not allowed, it doesn't fit the narrative.

It's good you're happy where you moved, surprisingly many Louisianians and New Orleanians are still happy and by god even prospering living here.
No need to get snarky with the you live there comment. It doesn't take living somewhere to find out its stagnant. Not allowed? Dude were having a conversation.

No one said people can't be happy in Louisiana. Calm your ****.
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Old 01-14-2021, 08:20 PM
 
53 posts, read 49,207 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgibs View Post
New Orleans isn't getting the growth of it's Southern peers such as Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, and Miami. Atlanta and Dallas have well diversified economies which helps their growth. Houston's economy isn't as well diversified but it's much more livable and growing faster than New Orleans.
Try tearing down those slummy crime havens and murder habitats down there and replace them with habitable apartments and houses. I used to live in Gert Town
and murder after murder, drive-by after drive-by and on.
The city lacks good city planners and they do not have a vision for the city. The area of Holly Grove should be torn down and rebuilt, Gert Town too and certainly by CLAIBORNE where there's nothing but CRIME, DRUGS and all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bgibs
Miami has a weak economy with low wages but it's growing alot more than New Orleans is. New Orleans's metro should at least be the size of Charlotte's metro. With the unique, valuable trademark New Orleans has, it should be bigger than what it is. New Orleans is one of the most unique, cultural cities in the Southeast but the QOL is one of the worst with bad schools, poverty, and crime. From the 70s to early 90s, Atlanta was a murder capital similar to New Orleans. Atlanta improved after the Olympics came through but New Orleans is still stagnant. I'm very well aware that Hurricane Katrina set New Orleans back but it's still having issues like it did pre-Katrina. New Orleans has tourism but is very blue collar and lacks corporations. How can New Orleans attract corporations? Why isn't gentrification hitting New Orleans like Atlanta? Is gentrification the only way New Orleans can grow?
Gentrification isn't a matter in Atlanta. Blacks do very well in Atlanta, Georgia as the people have a city wide goal. New Orleans is simply ran by people are too crooked and have no vision for the city. Seriously, New Orleans have to raze and rebuild Claiborne, even by Dorgenois it's very raggedy. The city need architects, planners to improve it's layout.

It's the Caribbean of The South without visionaries at all.
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Old 01-15-2021, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
1,522 posts, read 2,244,294 times
Reputation: 1041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deerhound View Post
Try tearing down those slummy crime havens and murder habitats down there and replace them with habitable apartments and houses. I used to live in Gert Town
and murder after murder, drive-by after drive-by and on.
The city lacks good city planners and they do not have a vision for the city. The area of Holly Grove should be torn down and rebuilt, Gert Town too and certainly by CLAIBORNE where there's nothing but CRIME, DRUGS and all.


Gentrification isn't a matter in Atlanta. Blacks do very well in Atlanta, Georgia as the people have a city wide goal. New Orleans is simply ran by people are too crooked and have no vision for the city. Seriously, New Orleans have to raze and rebuild Claiborne, even by Dorgenois it's very raggedy. The city need architects, planners to improve it's layout.

It's the Caribbean of The South without visionaries at all.
Gentrificaton is absolutely an issue in Atlanta...driven in its current form by that bull**** Beltline project. What you may think is a "city-wide" goal is actually not. The goal is to do exactly what the popular form of Gentrification does: remove certain demographics from logisticall loacted inner city properties. The tend in ATL is that people wanted to move back intown from the exurbs like Lawrenceville, Alpharetta, Kennesaw, etc. I own properties in a Beltline neighborhood, it adds no value whasoever. And to be clear, Blacks have done well in ATL for some time. The aftermath of the 96 Olympics just highlighted it for everyone to see as it became THE destination for upwardly mobile blacks wanting a better COL and QOL.

I agree, growing up in NOLA that the city as well as the state of La have always had a crooker politician problem. Not all of them but far too many to enact any economic progression. But what I do not agree with is completely "razing" parts of teh city. Katrina did that already. The city never really had a strong push for revitalization. But to say they need to completely tear down a part of the 17th is crazy. The city needs to actually plan, and bring in someone who can walk and chew gum at the same time; meaning they can keep the historic charm of the city whilst revitalizing it and ensuring that all can continue to live there.

One last thing, the areas you stated, as well as parts of the 7th ward, 6th ward, 8th ward, 9th ward, and even the East look how they look specifically because of absentee landlords. Thats another area that HUD and other departments could ramp up enforcement to begin to rectify the issue. Its way more nuanced than you allude to in your comments but I can agree on a few points.
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Old 01-15-2021, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Atlanta Metro Area (OTP North)
1,901 posts, read 3,086,131 times
Reputation: 1688
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
Gentrificaton is absolutely an issue in Atlanta...driven in its current form by that bull**** Beltline project. What you may think is a "city-wide" goal is actually not. The goal is to do exactly what the popular form of Gentrification does: remove certain demographics from logisticall loacted inner city properties. The tend in ATL is that people wanted to move back intown from the exurbs like Lawrenceville, Alpharetta, Kennesaw, etc. I own properties in a Beltline neighborhood, it adds no value whasoever. And to be clear, Blacks have done well in ATL for some time. The aftermath of the 96 Olympics just highlighted it for everyone to see as it became THE destination for upwardly mobile blacks wanting a better COL and QOL.

I agree, growing up in NOLA that the city as well as the state of La have always had a crooker politician problem. Not all of them but far too many to enact any economic progression. But what I do not agree with is completely "razing" parts of teh city. Katrina did that already. The city never really had a strong push for revitalization. But to say they need to completely tear down a part of the 17th is crazy. The city needs to actually plan, and bring in someone who can walk and chew gum at the same time; meaning they can keep the historic charm of the city whilst revitalizing it and ensuring that all can continue to live there.

One last thing, the areas you stated, as well as parts of the 7th ward, 6th ward, 8th ward, 9th ward, and even the East look how they look specifically because of absentee landlords. Thats another area that HUD and other departments could ramp up enforcement to begin to rectify the issue. Its way more nuanced than you allude to in your comments but I can agree on a few points.

+1


I do disagree about the Beltline, though. I think the biggest issues right now is the gentrification of Bankhead and the Westside - now being billed as "West Midtown"...but that's a topic for the Atlanta forum.

I love that you mentioned the absentee landlord issue, but even that is a byproduct of those landlords not being able to comfortably live in the city they own property in. I've considered it myself. You want to own a part of your home city, while also in some way contributing to the local economy...though it just doesn't work out as well as envisioned.

The area you own property in, as well the surrounding city, just continues to decline. Property value is lost instead of appreciated and soon you're stuck with the worst kind of tenants...and the elements they bring with them.

This is a huge issue that isn't easily fixed by kumbayas and well-wishes...nor by anecdotal examples of a building project here and there. Especially when we've seem several recent projects quickly devolve right back into the ghetto...
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Old 01-15-2021, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
1,522 posts, read 2,244,294 times
Reputation: 1041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chilly Gentilly View Post
+1


I do disagree about the Beltline, though. I think the biggest issues right now is the gentrification of Bankhead and the Westside - now being billed as "West Midtown"...but that's a topic for the Atlanta forum.

I love that you mentioned the absentee landlord issue, but even that is a byproduct of those landlords not being able to comfortably live in the city they own property in. I've considered it myself. You want to own a part of your home city, while also in some way contributing to the local economy...though it just doesn't work out as well as envisioned.

The area you own property in, as well the surrounding city, just continues to decline. Property value is lost instead of appreciated and soon you're stuck with the worst kind of tenants...and the elements they bring with them.

This is a huge issue that isn't easily fixed by kumbayas and well-wishes...nor by anecdotal examples of a building project here and there. Especially when we've seem several recent projects quickly devolve right back into the ghetto...
I can agree to disagree on it. Ive commented on it on the ATL thread over the years as well. Beofe moving to NYC, I owned multiple properties, living in one, in the Mechanicsville and Pittsburgh neighborhoods. The areas STILL have blight issues yet rehabbed properties like mine are selling for >$300K?? Its crazy. I have all kinds of issues with the Beltline....the city dropped the ball by not forcing the issue that it begin in lower income areas to spark economic investment and revitalization since they were begging for public funds. Then, they have not kept their word with the 30% affordable housing promise they made for development, and they defaulted on their payments of the advanced funds they got (which were tax dollars from APS) and had to be litigated. Beltline Inc gets no love from me. I was very active in my NPU and we meyt with them and the city many. many times over the years. But I wont relitigate it in the NOLA thread.

Aas far as the absentee landlord issue, I agree that its 2 fold but its part of homeownership and the city can affect the issue with its outside influence. Some homeowners aspire to be residents and others aspire to be investors. For that that want to live in the city, we have an oligation and fiduciary duty to a degree to ensure we upkeep our investments. An the city has code enforcement to regulate that. Its also incumbent on us as landlords to ensure we vet, to the best of our abilities potential tenants. Its very nuanced but being someone who was a renter and is now a landlord, the main culpability lies with us, then the city, then the tenant.

NOLA really needs to revamp their Urban Development strategy and department. Get serious about finally tackling the issues the city has. I remember growing up Uptown on Baronne and Louisiana ave...catching the buses all the way to the East on the wekend to go to the Plaza...walking from Chef down Read, we were amazed at the nighborhoods btween Lake Forest and Chef....the East was a different world. The city officials seem to have lost their ambition and imaginations. I think she has tons of potential but it starts at the top....
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Old 01-15-2021, 04:14 PM
 
53 posts, read 49,207 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
Gentrificaton is absolutely an issue in Atlanta...driven in its current form by that bull**** Beltline project. What you may think is a "city-wide" goal is actually not. The goal is to do exactly what the popular form of Gentrification does: remove certain demographics from logisticall loacted inner city properties. The tend in ATL is that people wanted to move back intown from the exurbs like Lawrenceville, Alpharetta, Kennesaw, etc.
New Orleans is suffering because of the many crooks mismanaging the wealth pouring in from tourism. The city is a giant ghetto outside of the Garden District and The French Quarter
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Old 01-15-2021, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
1,522 posts, read 2,244,294 times
Reputation: 1041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deerhound View Post
New Orleans is suffering because of the many crooks mismanaging the wealth pouring in from tourism. The city is a giant ghetto outside of the Garden District and The French Quarter
Growing up there I understand that all too well. The other part of the problem is access to economic ops. I stated earlier in the thread that the President of UNO, when I got my last degree in 2005 was questioning the business community and others in his commencement speech as to why the city ws losing its educated to other cities...brain drain. The city always had money. I grew up a few blocks from St. Charles on Louisiana Ave. The disparity is ridiculous. It has a lot to do with politicians running companies away from investment by shaking them down, but also politicians mismanaging the city from a fiscal and fiduciary perspective as well. And to broadly say the city is a ghetto outside of the Quarter and Garden District is a bit of a reach....even before Katrina. It has its issues but thats a reach...
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Old 01-19-2021, 08:06 PM
 
6,632 posts, read 4,300,748 times
Reputation: 7087
The assumption here is that native New Orleanians and government officials want it to grow economically. I was a resident of south LA for 35 years. You can’t compare it to Atlanta, Houston, other large southern cities... I’m convinced there is not a large desire for it to grow, and that’s ok. Even with its high crime rate and relative low economic growth, it’s still a national treasure, with it’s food, culture, people, music, traditions...much of which many of these other southern cities simply can’t offer, at least to the same extent.

Last edited by Lizap; 01-19-2021 at 08:18 PM..
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Old 01-21-2021, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
1,522 posts, read 2,244,294 times
Reputation: 1041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizap View Post
The assumption here is that native New Orleanians and government officials want it to grow economically. I was a resident of south LA for 35 years. You can’t compare it to Atlanta, Houston, other large southern cities... I’m convinced there is not a large desire for it to grow, and that’s ok. Even with its high crime rate and relative low economic growth, it’s still a national treasure, with it’s food, culture, people, music, traditions...much of which many of these other southern cities simply can’t offer, at least to the same extent.
I believe the adminstrations that have led the city do want to see it grow, economically. Whether or not they are interested in ensuring a robust portion of the population participate and benefit from that growth, IDK. The city can keep its intrinsice culture and charm AND increase its economics. I believe its all about revitalization, not gentrification. The city needs someone who can completely change the HUD department and leadership serious about tackling inherent socioeconomic issues.
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Old 01-21-2021, 06:44 PM
 
6,632 posts, read 4,300,748 times
Reputation: 7087
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
I believe the adminstrations that have led the city do want to see it grow, economically. Whether or not they are interested in ensuring a robust portion of the population participate and benefit from that growth, IDK. The city can keep its intrinsice culture and charm AND increase its economics. I believe its all about revitalization, not gentrification. The city needs someone who can completely change the HUD department and leadership serious about tackling inherent socioeconomic issues.
I don’t see this happening... it’s not just a NOLA problem-it’s a Louisiana issue. Just don’t see a lot of motivation to change things. Bobby Jindal tried to shake things up, but made very little, if any, progress in my opinion. People are more interested in family, food, fun, sports, etc., and that’s ok. It does make for a great lifestyle, provided you have a good way to make a living. Not sure how long you’ve been gone, but we lived on the Northshore and raised our family there. I will always have many wonderful memories of living there.
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