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Old 07-10-2008, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
1,357 posts, read 5,002,722 times
Reputation: 372

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Quote:
Originally Posted by High Springs Gator View Post
Are you referring to those who are legal, or illegal. I would assume many legal Hispanic workers would want to stay.
A mixture of both.
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Old 07-10-2008, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
1,357 posts, read 5,002,722 times
Reputation: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpruett View Post
Brman-please don't tell that houses today could actually be sitting on swamps! Okay that freaks me out a little bit, but I agree with your post. If we move to La, yes I might deal with hurricanes but I will be leaving tornados right> hey do you guys get a lot of tornados like Arkansas does? I live on the New Madrid fault line too right now. There are always possiblities of natural disasters no matter where you live.
In Orleans and Jefferson, absolutely - most of the settled area is on drained swamp. As is St John, St Charles, St Bernard, and parts of St Tammany.

Louisiana on average gets a nasty hurricane every few years (Andrew in 1992, Opal/Lili in 2002, Katrina/Rita in 2005). Every so often there are tornadoes, but that tends to be more up north.
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Old 07-10-2008, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Da Parish
1,127 posts, read 4,632,621 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpruett View Post
What are the Corps going to do about levees there now?
They claim that the levees will be better than Pre-K condition by 2009, 2010, 2011, etc. They also have constructed the MRGO levee with the wrong soil/clay, and used newspaper in the expansion joints, both efforts were strongly defended by the Corps until the public got wind of it. Some of the funding for rebuilding levees has been siphoned off to Iraq by congress. levees.org is the web site for a local grass roots org that has been keeping track of what the Corps has been doing. Personally I trust the Corps about as much as I would trust Warren Jeffs with my teenaged daughter.
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Old 07-10-2008, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Louisiana and Pennsylvania
2,830 posts, read 5,515,521 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miami305Kid View Post
Do you think that New Orleans will ever recover population wise from Hurricane Katrina and that its crime rate will drive out even more residents? Or do you think that time will heal N.O and that the city will have more people than it used to? Will N.O ever be the same?
N.O. will never be the "same" place many of us once knew, but I feel even with the devastation of Katrina, the city is re-inventing itself and will be vastly different from the N.O. of yesteryear, and in a great way.
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Old 07-12-2008, 11:36 PM
 
48,509 posts, read 86,720,312 times
Reputation: 18115
I thnik its well to remember that NO was nt hit directly by the storm and if the levys won't have brok it wouldn't have flooded. But that means that a dirct hit would do much worse thigs to new orlens. I thnik the floodgate syatem that would have keep the water from climbing in the canals is teh solution. But then teh environmantalist got a injunstion in the 60's to stop it. NO isn;t the only area of the country with levy's and the corp isn't going to ever have a budget to make any 100% safe. Look at the leveys that broke in the midwest. Then there are alot more leveys up the mississippi were they blew them in 1927 flood to save NO. Then also alot of wetlands that helped prevent such storm suge fron effecting the levys has been destroyed over the years. Personally there are alot of places just like in other flood plan area that should not be rebuilt on.The fact is NO without floodgates across the lake is never going to have alot of protection and a storm that hits more directly can do even more damge.Alot of things have changed over the years to the sorrounding area that makes NO more prone to floodig from storm surge than in the past. This was just what had been predicted to happen to NO one day because of all the problem living in a bowl.With all the leveys the corp has to now work on I wouldn't look for the levys to ever get the attention they really need.
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Old 07-15-2008, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,234 posts, read 14,463,383 times
Reputation: 25909
I think Katrina has changed New Orleans to a degree. It's opened up the city to possible, already-subtle changes in its culture, and THAT bothers me. Other than being a unique city with a unique history, it's culture was/is unique.

It's cuisine is unique. Not only is much of its music unique ~ zydeco, New Orleans-style jazz, Cajun, brass band music ~ but it was also the breeding ground for rock 'n' roll. Anyone who's never heard of the music of the Mardi Gras Indians, check it out on the website, especially the Wild Magnolias (the sound and style is indescribable). The Mardi Gras Indians is a perfect example of a culture within a culture that doesn't exist anywhere else in the states.

The people of New Orleans and the surrounding areas are tough and determined to carry on their legacy of all these special things they offer. Already there are challenges. The street parades it is famous for now require exhorbitant, outrageous fees, and if that keeps up it will be a matter of time before they're almost gone.

As more outsiders pour in, the bigger the threat of some of these unique features, because they won't understand it or deem it important. And if the Hispanic population swells big enough, expext a big crowding-in for THEIR culture in due time.

Things change everywhere with the passage of time.
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Old 07-22-2008, 05:05 PM
 
110 posts, read 356,073 times
Reputation: 28
FederaL,and Local Government would want to put a growth plan in place for NEW ORELANS, to put more people in harms way with out the proper infastructure would be foolish.
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Old 08-02-2008, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
1,734 posts, read 5,178,073 times
Reputation: 655
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
We have laws around here about building in a flood prone area. I should think that common sense should tell people not to go rebuilding where flood is a danger, except for tourist property where a profit can be made before that happens. So thinking logically, I would think that no New Orleans will never be the same again and it should not ever be the same again. There is lots of land in America, so at least try to build on solid ground.

Yes disasters happen, but a little common sense will keep unnecessary disasters from happening over and over again. Entire towns have been known to move when the place they were built has been found to be unsafe for one reason or the other.
Okay then, that's fine. Just go break the news to San Fran (earthquake central), Miami (Hurricane Central) , Oklahoma City (Tornado central) and you can get to work bulldozing.
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Old 08-02-2008, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
1,734 posts, read 5,178,073 times
Reputation: 655
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
I thnik its well to remember that NO was nt hit directly by the storm and if the levys won't have brok it wouldn't have flooded. But that means that a dirct hit would do much worse thigs to new orlens. I thnik the floodgate syatem that would have keep the water from climbing in the canals is teh solution. But then teh environmantalist got a injunstion in the 60's to stop it. NO isn;t the only area of the country with levy's and the corp isn't going to ever have a budget to make any 100% safe. Look at the leveys that broke in the midwest. Then there are alot more leveys up the mississippi were they blew them in 1927 flood to save NO. Then also alot of wetlands that helped prevent such storm suge fron effecting the levys has been destroyed over the years. Personally there are alot of places just like in other flood plan area that should not be rebuilt on.The fact is NO without floodgates across the lake is never going to have alot of protection and a storm that hits more directly can do even more damge.Alot of things have changed over the years to the sorrounding area that makes NO more prone to floodig from storm surge than in the past. This was just what had been predicted to happen to NO one day because of all the problem living in a bowl.With all the leveys the corp has to now work on I wouldn't look for the levys to ever get the attention they really need.
Technically, though the city was to the East of the eye, you have the funnel effect that came from the MRGO, which is now (or is soon to be) plugged up so that can't ever happen again. That was an expressway for the open gulf water to go directly into the port of New Orleans. With that blocked, as well as floodgates at the mouth of all drainage canals, alot of water has been taken out of the picture should another Katrina sized storm strike. I don't predict the main section of New Orleans ever seeing that much flooding ever again. I don't think it is impossible for Plaquemines and St. Bernard to suffer flooding like that seen in Katrina, but New Orleans itself has reduced it's risk significantly.
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Old 08-02-2008, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
1,734 posts, read 5,178,073 times
Reputation: 655
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesbabe View Post
I think Katrina has changed New Orleans to a degree. It's opened up the city to possible, already-subtle changes in its culture, and THAT bothers me. Other than being a unique city with a unique history, it's culture was/is unique.

It's cuisine is unique. Not only is much of its music unique ~ zydeco, New Orleans-style jazz, Cajun, brass band music ~ but it was also the breeding ground for rock 'n' roll. Anyone who's never heard of the music of the Mardi Gras Indians, check it out on the website, especially the Wild Magnolias (the sound and style is indescribable). The Mardi Gras Indians is a perfect example of a culture within a culture that doesn't exist anywhere else in the states.

The people of New Orleans and the surrounding areas are tough and determined to carry on their legacy of all these special things they offer. Already there are challenges. The street parades it is famous for now require exhorbitant, outrageous fees, and if that keeps up it will be a matter of time before they're almost gone.

As more outsiders pour in, the bigger the threat of some of these unique features, because they won't understand it or deem it important. And if the Hispanic population swells big enough, expext a big crowding-in for THEIR culture in due time.

Things change everywhere with the passage of time.
I agree, New Orleans people are some of the toughest around. Trying to tell them what to do isn't really a good idea because that will just be more incentive for them to do it anyway. lol.
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