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Old 08-04-2008, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Hell with the lid off, baby!
2,193 posts, read 5,333,680 times
Reputation: 379

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Take it from someone who lives in an area that suffered a mass exodus of its citizens. All-be-it under different circumstances, Pittsburgh, PA was once in the same boat, as far as population loss, as New Orleans currently is. During the early 80s Pittsburgh had a population of over 600k. Then the U.S. Steel industry collapsed, for several different reasons, over the course of the rest of the decade. Pittsburgh's population plunged to just about 300k by the end of the 90s. Today, a decade and a half later, the bleeding has finally stopped, and things are starting to turn around for the better. The Pittsburgh area's economy is growing once again, has a bright future and our housing market is stable and very affordable, unlike most of the country's. Our population is showing signs of becoming younger again, and increasing slightly. All this despite our nation being in a major recession. New Orleans, and other parts of Mississippi and Alabama that suffered from Katrina, it will take time. Lot's of time. But those of you that have stayed, are moving back, or are new to the area; I wish you good luck. I've recently welcomed a young couple and their family to Pittsburgh, from New Orleans, and I hope that you extend the same courtesy to anyone coming to New Orleans. Peace
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Old 08-05-2008, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Cordova TN
7 posts, read 19,698 times
Reputation: 26
(1) People are rebuilding in New Orleans - and its suburbs because either (a) plain and simple, it's home - were born & raised there, or (b) the zest for life, love, food etc. is a true celebration among natives, like nowhere else, or (c) they've moved from somewhere else and agree with point (b.)
(2) Crime? Yes. Does exist. Was a problem before Katrina and remains one now. Less of a problem in suburbs, like Jefferson Parish, where government in general admittedly works better than in Orleans Parish. In general, though, most of it is in the same neighborhoods as when I was a little boy... I'm now in my 50's. Go to any city in the U. S. larger than about 16,000, turn on local news, and you'll find that all the same things happen- only the names of the neighborhoods and streets are different.
(3) Flooding? There is street flooding in some areas every time there's a hard rain, to be expected when most of the area is below sea level. Other than the great rain of 1995 and - of course - Katrina - it usually doesn't get into residences or businesses.

BTW, about building below sea level- is anybody outlawing people building on the hillsides and deserts of California, subject to wildfires, mudslides, and last but certainly not least, earthquakes? Under the reasoning of one poster from "Metrolina" (where is that? Charlotte?) the cities of Los Angeles Miami, and the entire Florida Keys would also need to be relocated. Hey, let's move Minneapolis and Detroit, while we're at it, due to the face-numbing life-threatening winters. Good idea? Maybe. Likely to occur? What do you think?
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Old 09-05-2008, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
8,689 posts, read 17,460,687 times
Reputation: 6072
Quote:
Originally Posted by High Springs Gator View Post
Are you referring to those who are legal, or illegal. I would assume many legal Hispanic workers would want to stay.
The illegals ones will want to stay as well. You have both legal and illegal workers migrating all over the country.
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Old 09-06-2008, 12:41 AM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,234 posts, read 14,464,621 times
Reputation: 25909
Quote:
Originally Posted by geno722 View Post
BTW, about building below sea level- is anybody outlawing people building on the hillsides and deserts of California, subject to wildfires, mudslides, and last but certainly not least, earthquakes? Under the reasoning of one poster from "Metrolina" (where is that? Charlotte?) the cities of Los Angeles Miami, and the entire Florida Keys would also need to be relocated. Hey, let's move Minneapolis and Detroit, while we're at it, due to the face-numbing life-threatening winters. Good idea? Maybe. Likely to occur? What do you think?
You should see the houses-on-stilts along hillsides here in Portland, Oregon, that were once considered "unbuildable". This is an area prone to mudslides, and these houses have been built since the 80's. No excuse for it. Not only are they eye-sores ~ they didn't NEED to be built there. And I guess the point I'm making is that some places are still building homes ~ today ~ in areas of great risk, to fill the pockets of developers. Yes, it's true that no area in the states is protected from some type of disaster, but whenever I see construction like this, it's obvious that common sense doesn't matter.
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Old 09-06-2008, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
1,479 posts, read 7,255,076 times
Reputation: 1923
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesbabe View Post
You should see the houses-on-stilts along hillsides here in Portland, Oregon, that were once considered "unbuildable". This is an area prone to mudslides, and these houses have been built since the 80's. No excuse for it. Not only are they eye-sores ~ they didn't NEED to be built there. And I guess the point I'm making is that some places are still building homes ~ today ~ in areas of great risk, to fill the pockets of developers. Yes, it's true that no area in the states is protected from some type of disaster, but whenever I see construction like this, it's obvious that common sense doesn't matter.
It's definitely unsettling to contemplate the end result of building in such untenable areas. Developers wouldn't build in such places if people didn't buy the houses they built. Lacking local government oversight, it becomes the responsibility of the purchaser to determine the suitability of the location and often people are blinded to the practicality and safety of a location by the emotional impact of a wonderful view. I wonder how insurance rates are calculated, though. Do homes in these locations require homeowners insurance through an assigned risk pool? The rates must be astronomical !
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