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Old 01-21-2009, 12:45 PM
 
127 posts, read 461,765 times
Reputation: 62

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Quote:
Originally Posted by miserylovesco. View Post
The slow death of New Orleans.

I moved to New Orleans in hopes to harness something inside.
I fought tooth and nail to be here, to live in the city that birthed Jazz, where the bars don’t close and the music is as hot as the food.
I knew what I was getting into, to truly love something; you have to love it for its flaws.
New Orleans is, a flawed city.
Yet, those of us who love it will defend it when its face is buried in the social dog **** that we’re allowing.
We cannot turn our heads any longer, crime is crippling this city and every day people are finding more and more reasons to pack their things and find a new place to celebrate life. A safer place, in a city that can barely contain somewhere between 300K and 400K (depending on who you ask) we beat the national crime average by 12%, that is a sobering number. The New Orleans murder rate is higher than the rest of the country but everyone will still proudly admit that it’s down!
This is NOT a good thing.

Last night a woman was shot and killed during an armed robbery, she lost her life over money. This instance was not in the slums, but in the bread and butter of the city: the French quarter. The place where the money is made and tourists flock to.
Three kids held her up on the way to her car, three kids who have no value on life and more than likely spent her blood money without the blink of an eye.
This is another notch in the belt of a dying city.
Leadership is a joke and no one will take responsibility of the actions of the citizens.
What can we do?
If the one place that buoy’s the local economy is under fire, then everything is lost.
It’s a sad reality to know that certain neighborhoods have to pay for private security forces to patrol as a measure to keep their residents safe.
Again, not a good thing.

Rallies don’t work, prayer doesn’t work, and the police certainly don’t work.
It’s not as simple as some might point the finger and say it’s all black people.
It’s a matter that bad people who are constantly given multiple chances to continue heinous behavior only grow worse and the company they keep only sees this and acts accordingly.
I have lived in a section of the city that had drug dealers on my stoop, people screaming at all hours.
I have heard descriptive accounts of where drugs are hidden and who wants to kill whom.
Now, I live in a “nice” part of the city. Do I buy it? Not really, I’m just waiting for the shoe to drop. Something is bound to happen in our happy little neighborhood.
It’s the New Orleans brand: nothing is perfect.





I am at a loss for what we’re expected to do outside moving away, going to live someplace where crime doesn’t stare you in the eye and places it’s finger directly in your face and you’re supposed to make a choice; deal or leave.
The people need to stand up for each other, to do something to make this place livable again. When you’re having a good night here, it’s the stuff of legend but when you have that one bad night…you could end up in a pine box.
I implore people aside from myself to do something, say something, start a movement.
Because we cannot accept this any further.

To sweep life under the rug only makes the pile larger and vile.
These are only words on a screen but they are real issues that need to be addressed and unless the city wants everyone armed and ready to end the next attacker by way of vigilante justice, something must be done and NOW.
I don’t have the answers and I wish I wasn’t writing this but this is our reality.
I am enclosing my email address; let’s start a revolution together.
I don’t know what we can do, but let’s at least talk, have a drink and see if we can think of SOMETHING that can help.
Anything at this point is a blessing.

This is life in New Orleans, murder happens.
Kidcarre@gmail.com

I am thinking of moving back to New Orleans after 14 years of living on the west coast and overseas. My mother has mixed feelings about it. Sure, she wants us (her family and grandkids closer) but the danger aspect of the city scares her. I grew up in New Orleans and left without EVER thinking I'd ever WANT to return but as I get older I long for "home" and "family." With that said I must say the murders in the city are appalling. The French Quarter is supposed to be the bread and butter of New Orleans yet there isn't enough protection for citizens and tourist!!! That just does NOT make sense to me. I live in what many would consider a "hood" out here in California and I can't go to the corner without seeing two police cars speed by. Do I feel safe 98% of the time - YES! Their mere presence is a deterrent to the thugs that want to rob, kill and destroy.

I am so upset at the utter lack of change in the city of New Orleans. The corrupt politicians, the youth that devalue life, the scum of the city "ruling" the streets and terrorizing the good citizens. Yet I am glad I don't have to deal with it. I am constantly second guessing my decision to move back. Do I want my children dealing with such backwards unintelligent thinking? Where are the progressive thinkers/ people? Where are the people that REALLY want change and are willing to do whatever it takes to get it? If that means voting out the politicians who do NOTHING but turn a blind eye to the sinking hole New Orleans has become than DO THAT!!!!!!!! Why are New Orleanians so afraid of NEW BLOOD???

I just don't get it. I have so many friends who left after Katrina never to return. They've gotten better jobs and their kids are attending better schools and they plan to make a life for themselves in those new places - a BETTER life. Doesn't New Orleans get it? The good people are gone or planning to leave? Why are you allowing thugs to take over your/ our city?
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Old 01-21-2009, 12:51 PM
 
127 posts, read 461,765 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ren1245 View Post
we are relocating to New Orleans this summer simply because thats where we feel we should be. The murder in the french quarter this weekend has really shakin us up. We were always told that for the most part as long as we stay out of bad areas that the crime should not effect us to much. We love New Orleans but have 2 sons, 17 and 10 that we want to be safe. I guess we just want some advice maybe from people that has moved from out of state like ourselves.
Same here. Starting to think it's just not worth it. Would go back to
AZ if I could. Felt very safe there.
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Old 01-21-2009, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,866 posts, read 58,421,749 times
Reputation: 19202
I saw part of the Gangland episode which featured N.O. They talked a lot about he 60-day rule and how so many people were never charged and then were let loose. When the thugs got to Houston, there was no 60-day rule and they were surprised. What is the 60-day rule for arrested people? I don't ever remember knowing about that. Or maybe it's new since I left in 1996.
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Old 01-21-2009, 01:06 PM
 
127 posts, read 461,765 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
I saw part of the Gangland episode which featured N.O. They talked a lot about he 60-day rule and how so many people were never charged and then were let loose. When the thugs got to Houston, there was no 60-day rule and they were surprised. What is the 60-day rule for arrested people? I don't ever remember knowing about that. Or maybe it's new since I left in 1996.
My husband saw that and was shocked at how ruthless these thugs are.
Apparently NOLA has some stupid rule if no witnesses come forth within
60 days to testify against you - you go free. The people are so scared they never do so the criminals get out but Texas doesn't have that rule so they stay locked up - as they should.
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Old 01-21-2009, 01:48 PM
cla
 
898 posts, read 3,026,124 times
Reputation: 561
11 homicides. I did notice a reference to homicide 37 on nola.com - but it was a story about the 37th homicide of 2008. Perhaps that is what you saw.

Check this site out for specific crimes during specific dates in N.O.

New Orleans Citizen Crime Watch
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Old 01-22-2009, 03:22 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
258 posts, read 940,353 times
Reputation: 95
I seriously have issues with how much I care about this city and how I still constantly consider moving back to Chicago. I NEVER, EVER felt like I would get mugged/killed when I'd leave some where alone at all hours of the night.

Here, I always feel like I have to keep one eye open at all times. That's a pretty sad existence if you ask me.
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Old 01-22-2009, 08:43 AM
 
6 posts, read 12,261 times
Reputation: 17
In the near future I was heavily considering a move with my young family to New Orleans. Like so many others posting here in the same situation i must say I am second guessing that thought. While reading through all the posts I thinks it's safe to say those who are current residents are tired of this crime. Many people here sound defeated and ready to give up on New Orleans, feelings which I can understand under the given environment. The problem is where are the progressive, aggressive, determined leaders of the community? Where is the real fight going on right now if things are really as bad as they are made to seem. The people must demand change, they must insist times are going to be different. If we wait for someone else to make it better, the responsibility will keep getting passed on. If politicians are not effective hold them accountable. The people of any given city or town will decide how high it soars or low it sinks.
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Old 01-22-2009, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Jackson, MS
59 posts, read 180,387 times
Reputation: 55
Like some of the other posters, I have also coinsidered moving my family to NOLA next year in order for me to attend graduate school. My children and I love NOLA. We want to be an active participant of this city. I do cringe when I hear about the murders and wonder if I should move my family there. Then, I talk to the people in my area from NOLA and they tell me about how much they miss the city and they can't wait until they return home. They tell me that I should move and be apart of her rebirth. There is crime everywhere and we can't truly escape it. In fact, I live in Jackson, MS and we just set an all time high for murders in 2008. I realize that there are many people in NOLA who wouldn't leave the city for absolutley nothing because they love it that much, flaws and all. I really want to be one of those residents. I want to come to NOLA and help bring the city back to it's full potential. I'm only one person and I know I might not be able to do much, but I do know I can do something; if it's just casting a vote for someone who really has the city's best interest at heart. I read the Times -Picayune and watch WDSU online on a daily basis, so I can keep up with what is going on. I want to be apart of a "new" New Orleans. We just witnessed change sweep across America Tuesday. Maybe NOLA can witness the same.
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Old 01-22-2009, 10:27 AM
 
Location: southern california
58,549 posts, read 77,475,915 times
Reputation: 52117
Quote:
Originally Posted by miserylovesco. View Post
The slow death of New Orleans.

I moved to New Orleans in hopes to harness something inside.
I fought tooth and nail to be here, to live in the city that birthed Jazz, where the bars don’t close and the music is as hot as the food.
I knew what I was getting into, to truly love something; you have to love it for its flaws.
New Orleans is, a flawed city.
Yet, those of us who love it will defend it when its face is buried in the social dog **** that we’re allowing.
We cannot turn our heads any longer, crime is crippling this city and every day people are finding more and more reasons to pack their things and find a new place to celebrate life. A safer place, in a city that can barely contain somewhere between 300K and 400K (depending on who you ask) we beat the national crime average by 12%, that is a sobering number. The New Orleans murder rate is higher than the rest of the country but everyone will still proudly admit that it’s down!
This is NOT a good thing.

Last night a woman was shot and killed during an armed robbery, she lost her life over money. This instance was not in the slums, but in the bread and butter of the city: the French quarter. The place where the money is made and tourists flock to.
Three kids held her up on the way to her car, three kids who have no value on life and more than likely spent her blood money without the blink of an eye.
This is another notch in the belt of a dying city.
Leadership is a joke and no one will take responsibility of the actions of the citizens.
What can we do?
If the one place that buoy’s the local economy is under fire, then everything is lost.
It’s a sad reality to know that certain neighborhoods have to pay for private security forces to patrol as a measure to keep their residents safe.
Again, not a good thing.

Rallies don’t work, prayer doesn’t work, and the police certainly don’t work.
It’s not as simple as some might point the finger and say it’s all black people.
It’s a matter that bad people who are constantly given multiple chances to continue heinous behavior only grow worse and the company they keep only sees this and acts accordingly.
I have lived in a section of the city that had drug dealers on my stoop, people screaming at all hours.
I have heard descriptive accounts of where drugs are hidden and who wants to kill whom.
Now, I live in a “nice” part of the city. Do I buy it? Not really, I’m just waiting for the shoe to drop. Something is bound to happen in our happy little neighborhood.
It’s the New Orleans brand: nothing is perfect.





I am at a loss for what we’re expected to do outside moving away, going to live someplace where crime doesn’t stare you in the eye and places it’s finger directly in your face and you’re supposed to make a choice; deal or leave.
The people need to stand up for each other, to do something to make this place livable again. When you’re having a good night here, it’s the stuff of legend but when you have that one bad night…you could end up in a pine box.
I implore people aside from myself to do something, say something, start a movement.
Because we cannot accept this any further.

To sweep life under the rug only makes the pile larger and vile.
These are only words on a screen but they are real issues that need to be addressed and unless the city wants everyone armed and ready to end the next attacker by way of vigilante justice, something must be done and NOW.
I don’t have the answers and I wish I wasn’t writing this but this is our reality.
I am enclosing my email address; let’s start a revolution together.
I don’t know what we can do, but let’s at least talk, have a drink and see if we can think of SOMETHING that can help.
Anything at this point is a blessing.

This is life in New Orleans, murder happens.
Kidcarre@gmail.com
beautiful post. a voice crying in the wilderness.
the glorification of violent crime must stop.
grotesque-- snoop dog romancing a corpse.
your post is so refreshing, so much better
than the denial posts re New Orleans
signed
a former new orleans resident
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Old 01-22-2009, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,234 posts, read 14,464,621 times
Reputation: 25909
That 60-day rule sounds like it had good intentions, but people tend to not want to get involved in crime-ridden places. New Orleans, from what I gather through much reading, has a very long history of drugs and corruption, as well as masses that relied too much on the government to take care of them. I'm not complaining here ~ it's simply how it's been. With all these things going against them, reform will not be an easy task, if at all. By 'reform', I mean CRIME. Yes, I realize that crime tends to go hand-n-hand with poor communities. I don't have the answers, either.

Reading these posts does make me a little nervous for my upcoming trip in April. We'll be there for 10 days. We were there for 10 days two years ago and immensely enjoyed it. It felt good to provide some tourism money that the city so needs. But we stay in the Marigny. I just hope we don't encounter something this year that will make it our last visit there. That would be really sad.
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