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Old 08-17-2009, 10:44 AM
 
27 posts, read 118,274 times
Reputation: 20

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We (soon to be retirees in mid-50's) are thinking of relocating from DC to New Orleans.

We like urban living - being able to walk to a lot of things - and are drawn to New Orelans due to the pleasant winter weather, character, lively street life.

Three of our criteria are:

1. A place that one can do without a car. Where there a fair amount of pedestrians around, where everyday (grocery, drugstore, etc) shopping is near at hand. We do have a car in DC, because of current work, but would gladly ditch it if we could get by with renting every once in a while if retired.

2. A place we can afford. We would like a two bedroom condo (approximately 1,200 square feet or so), move-in ready for up to about $500,000. We would not rule out a small house of the same size, but more likely a condo.

3. Good health care.

We have visited the city a few times, and read more about it (from a relocation angle) on the internet.

The neighborhoods we feel we are interested in are the CBD, French Quarter, Warehouse District, close to those areas in the Gardent district.

Would those areas fit the bill for the criteria listed above?

How is the noise factor in even the quieter parts of the French Quarter?

How is crime (we are used to living in a big city - we live in the middle of DC)?

Are there other areas to consider? Based on what I know, the areas I mention are best for not having to rely on a car.

It seems that there are no substantial supermarkets in the central parts of the city that I list. True? If true, where do people do their food shopping? (By the way, that is very different than in DC.)

Thanks for your input.
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Old 08-17-2009, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Monroe, Louisiana
887 posts, read 2,707,504 times
Reputation: 539
I was very impressed with the Warehouse District. Sorry I can't be of more help since I haven't lived in NOLA in a long time.
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Old 08-17-2009, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,865 posts, read 57,901,167 times
Reputation: 19182
"Good weather"? not so true unless you like hot and himid - think 85-90% humidity.

No supermarkets downtown. There are ones upriver from the Warehouse District. I think you would need to keep your car. Remember, people need to evacuate for hurricanes.
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Old 08-17-2009, 01:25 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,331,678 times
Reputation: 1418
There is a Rouses supermarket in the Quarter and enough Walgreens/CVS's/Rite Aid's in the CBD to go around. You might want to hold on to the car, it can come in handy depeneding on where you have to go or like SoutherBelle said in case of an evacuation. You may like Warehouse District or the CBD, but parking can be expensive depending on where you live. You might be interested in some parts of Uptown as well. The quarter can be loud, the quieter areas not as bad but relative safety declines the further toward the lake you go.
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Old 08-17-2009, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
1,734 posts, read 5,148,234 times
Reputation: 651
Definitely plan to keep the car just for emergencies. You don't want to be caught without a car in New Orleans if a Hurricane is a comin.
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Old 12-07-2013, 09:38 AM
 
11 posts, read 13,428 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by HBINDC View Post
We (soon to be retirees in mid-50's) are thinking of relocating from DC to New Orleans.

We like urban living - being able to walk to a lot of things - and are drawn to New Orelans due to the pleasant winter weather, character, lively street life.

Three of our criteria are:

1. A place that one can do without a car. Where there a fair amount of pedestrians around, where everyday (grocery, drugstore, etc) shopping is near at hand. We do have a car in DC, because of current work, but would gladly ditch it if we could get by with renting every once in a while if retired.

2. A place we can afford. We would like a two bedroom condo (approximately 1,200 square feet or so), move-in ready for up to about $500,000. We would not rule out a small house of the same size, but more likely a condo.

3. Good health care.

We have visited the city a few times, and read more about it (from a relocation angle) on the internet.

The neighborhoods we feel we are interested in are the CBD, French Quarter, Warehouse District, close to those areas in the Gardent district.

Would those areas fit the bill for the criteria listed above?

How is the noise factor in even the quieter parts of the French Quarter?

How is crime (we are used to living in a big city - we live in the middle of DC)?

Are there other areas to consider? Based on what I know, the areas I mention are best for not having to rely on a car.

It seems that there are no substantial supermarkets in the central parts of the city that I list. True? If true, where do people do their food shopping? (By the way, that is very different than in DC.)

Thanks for your input.
Did you ever retire in NOLA? I am considering doing the same, and I have the same questions you had, about "walkability" and living there without a car.
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Old 12-08-2013, 08:11 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
2,311 posts, read 4,353,383 times
Reputation: 1442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopin0913 View Post
Did you ever retire in NOLA? I am considering doing the same, and I have the same questions you had, about "walkability" and living there without a car.
I know you've been posting on the San Francisco thread, and we've already said this, but it bears repeating:

1. Housing prices are very reasonable compared to other parts of the country. You can find a place in a *walkable* section of Uptown that won't break the retiree bank. You can just get a "utility car" in case you absolutely have to go out to the burbs or evacuate. Lots of young people just ride bikes and catch rides with friends.

2. The people...we're a tourism-oriented city so just about every local will have the equivalent of a "master's degree" in showing people a good time. That's not just for show; we really do like meeting new people and having them experience the city. If you move here from somewhere else expect that treatment ×10.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk
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Old 12-11-2013, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,190 posts, read 2,994,032 times
Reputation: 2921
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neworleansisprettygood View Post
1. Housing prices are very reasonable compared to other parts of the country. You can find a place in a *walkable* section of Uptown that won't break the retiree bank. You can just get a "utility car" in case you absolutely have to go out to the burbs or evacuate. Lots of young people just ride bikes and catch rides with friends.
This is such a rare find. I've been searching the internet for too long trying to find cities near the water that are walkable and offer good public transit options. I would need at least $300,000 for a house the size of a closet in most cities.

I've been to NO once. The food, music scene, and cost of living might not be a bad trade off.
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Old 12-11-2013, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Sandy Springs (ATL)
1,887 posts, read 2,475,316 times
Reputation: 1595
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
This is such a rare find. I've been searching the internet for too long trying to find cities near the water that are walkable and offer good public transit options. I would need at least $300,000 for a house the size of a closet in most cities.

I've been to NO once. The food, music scene, and cost of living might not be a bad trade off.
New Orleans definitely offers a lot for such affordability. Its the only city that delivers this level of culture, uniqueness, year-round festivals, history, music + arts, etc. and still give you change back.
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Old 12-11-2013, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,190 posts, read 2,994,032 times
Reputation: 2921
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chilly Gentilly View Post
New Orleans definitely offers a lot for such affordability. Its the only city that delivers this level of culture, uniqueness, year-round festivals, history, music + arts, etc. and still give you change back.
Yes. I have to decide if I can live with the humidity.
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