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Old 09-12-2010, 01:52 AM
 
6 posts, read 22,045 times
Reputation: 15

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Hi!

So I am planning to move into an apartment in the Manhattan area (don't know the area yet... but that's another post) and am wondering what breed would be a good fit for my situation. I feel that since I do not have a place yet now would be a good time to find out so that when i do look for apartments I can let the landlord/super know my intentions. (I know that this may slow my finding an apartment but i am in relatively no rush (I currently live at home in Westchester so it is relatively close enough to the city and my university). Also, i know the cost that are incurred with a dog (I had a Shih Tzu for 10 years).

Ok so now that the preliminaries are out of the way here are a few things I should note: I will be a female college student living by myself (i am 21 and have 1.5 years left) so I feel as if a big dog would be good (visuals are key and the dog would act as a deterant). I will have friends over relatively often so dogs that are bad with other people probably wouldn't be the best for me. I wouldn't mind taking the dog on walks (even in the rain and the winter). And I'm sure that my neighbors would not appreciate a nosy dog. I am prepared to take the dog to training classes as well as grooming needs and of course the vet. Most of all, i want a new best friend that I can love abundantly (and yes I will be getting the cute sweaters from the pet store ^_^)

I know that's a lot of reading but I don't want to get a dog that wouldn't do well in my situation. That would be very unfair for the dog. So if there is a dog that is close to my description please don't hesitate to let me know i am open to all ideas and suggestions. Thank you very much!

(oh and I am not opposed to adopting a shelter dog if anyone knows any places... I was thinking of adopting a young or adult dog. That way it has energy (unlike a senior dog) but won't need the constant catering to (like a puppy)... )
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Old 09-12-2010, 07:29 PM
 
769 posts, read 1,897,908 times
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Get whatever dog you want and then find an apartment that will take him/her. The only thing you really need to stay from are "agressive" breeds. We have a golden retriever and haven't had problems finding places that will let us take him. Just realize that dogs living in NYC need to be walked a lot in order to exercise and burn energy. You definetely don't want a puppy/dog that has no way to burn off energy living in a small apartment- it will be a disaster. And also some apartments, not all, will charge an additional non-refundable pet deposit when you move in.

Obviously you will have more options if the dog is under 25 pounds, but I really think you should just get whatever dog you want to have.
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Old 09-12-2010, 08:25 PM
 
15 posts, read 27,418 times
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You will have no problem finding rescue shelters in the NYC area. All you really need to do is google your area.... for an ex. Manhattan:

NY ASPCA
ASPCA | New York City
424 East 92nd Street

Bideawee
Bideawee, for the Love of Pets. Adopt a Pet, Veterinary Care, NYC
410 East 38th Street

The Humane Society of New York
The Humane Society Of New York
306 East 59th Street

Animal Haven
Animal Haven, a shelter for cats and dogs
251 Centre Street

Just a few listed.
Remember, Petfinder is also a very good source.

Good luck!
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Old 09-12-2010, 08:28 PM
 
483 posts, read 776,920 times
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You can have any breed that your heart desires, even an aggressive breed. Just know that it is hard enough finding rentals with a dog let alone an aggressive breed. The upper west side is very dog friendly, almost everyone here has a dog/s. I have seen everything from Yorkies to pit bulls to a lady walking 2 large white beautiful German Shepards. As a matter of fact, I fell in love with a beautiful red nose pit bull this morning, I couldn't stop petting her. I asked the owner if she had any trouble finding an apartment with the pit bull and she said no. I'm sure though that she is the exception and not the rule.

Having a dog in the city is very expensive. A few weeks ago I brought my two to the vet and paid about $700 for both of their rabies, one got the bordetella and both got their yearly blood work. I also bought heartworm medication and frontline for them. I then spent about $350 on some canned foods, dry food, a new harness/collar, treats and "just in case" pads. I spend about $170 to get them groomed. About 3 hours ago I went to the pet store and just spent $131 on 9 cans of dog food, 3 bags of dog treats and a new harness. Just warning you.
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Old 09-12-2010, 08:53 PM
 
5 posts, read 12,462 times
Reputation: 11
Default Dog in an apartment?

It is a common misconception that if you live in an apartment, you cannot have a dog. However, there are many dogs that are well-suited to apartment life, no matter what your tastes. The key to keeping any dog in an apartment is providing enough exercise. Dogs are canine animals which retain the instinct to migrate. Therefore, even small dogs need to be taken out for daily walks. Enough daily exercise is the key to keeping any dog stable and happy. So you can choose any dog as you like.
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Old 11-13-2013, 08:21 PM
 
Location: MA
9 posts, read 10,703 times
Reputation: 15
I know this thread is old but I just wanted to add my two cents. I have adopted two dogs and each time the rescue group or shelter was very helpful in matching me to the right dog in terms of my living & working situation at the time ( ie living in apartment or house & how many hour I would be at work), the dog's temperament or personality, etc. I believe working with a good rescue group or shelter is your best bet not just because you'll be saving that dog's life but also because you can ask advice and find out more information about the particular dog.

I would also like to add on to what kristin48616 said - it is indeed a misconception that dogs especially big dogs shouldn't live in apartments. There is site I think through Petfinder that helps match possible dog breeds with your lifestyle - you answer questions about how much time you are willing to spend on walking/exercising your dog, grooming, etc and what kind of place you live. There are certain breeds and certain individual dogs for that matter (breeds aren't always accurate especially with rescue dogs, and dogs do have individual personalities) who have low indoor energy and they can be all different sizes. For example, my dogs have been 75 & 85 pounds -- medium size to me ; ) -- and totally happy living in apartments with me. My first dog moved with me to different places, from apartment in the middle of Hollywood to suburban house with a yard and what mattered to her was being with me, and me spending quality time with her going on long walks or hikes as much as possible. In the house/apartment, both she and my current dog are pretty much couch potatoes.

It's so sad to me that many landlords don't get this, and put random weight limits on dogs or don't allow them at all, often because they had a bad experience renting to someone with a dog in the past. That's a bad human, not a bad dog in many if not most cases.
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Old 11-14-2013, 12:42 AM
 
Location: Earth
7,196 posts, read 4,523,538 times
Reputation: 5322
Do you seriously need a dog?

you're college student. You're going to busy studying and partying in NYC.

Plus a dog poops and pees.

Wait until you graduate and are ready to stay in one place. Then get a dog. Its harder looking for apartments with a dog.
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Old 11-14-2013, 10:39 AM
 
2,057 posts, read 2,553,077 times
Reputation: 4150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dangerous-Boy View Post
Do you seriously need a dog?

you're college student. You're going to busy studying and partying in NYC.

Plus a dog poops and pees.

Wait until you graduate and are ready to stay in one place. Then get a dog. Its harder looking for apartments with a dog.
You are aware that this thread is over 3 years old? At this point the OP could have graduated school or even moved out of the city by now.
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