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Old 07-01-2007, 08:00 PM
 
4 posts, read 18,492 times
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I'll be moving to the tiniest, cheapest, ***hole apartment I can find in one of the outer boroughs in about a year. Question is, will it be impossible to find a place that allows dogs? If anyone has insight or advice about renting with a dog, or about finding cheap and crappy apartments in general, I'd be really grateful.

(Not that I prefer crappy apartments, but I'm a waitress/bartender who just really wants to live in New York, and I'll do about anything to make it happen.)

Thanks!
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Old 07-09-2007, 01:35 PM
 
10 posts, read 49,180 times
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It's really not too hard to find a place that will take a dog. And unlike most cities, we don't charge pet rents or deposits. It's either dog or no dog. I will admit that it's harder to find an apartment for a dog than a cat, but you should be able to find a reasonably priced place somewhere in the Bronx, Brooklyn or Queens.
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Old 07-09-2007, 02:35 PM
 
7,079 posts, read 35,542,439 times
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Actually it's not uncommon to be asked to provide a pet deposit. Having said that, you shouldn't have too much of a problem finding a dog-friendly building.
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Old 07-09-2007, 05:01 PM
 
122 posts, read 756,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XComsgirl View Post
It's really not too hard to find a place that will take a dog. And unlike most cities, we don't charge pet rents or deposits.
I've been looking recently, and I don't think that's true. For a place I'm looking at now, the pet deposit is $500 (refundable). That's not why I don't doubt what you say, though; NYC is expensive as hell and people will charge you for whatever they can get away with. And now, my 2 cents:

From what I've found, it seems like apartments in, er, less safe neighborhoods like Bushwick and Bed-Stuy allow dogs more than in other neighborhoods. Also, when you search on Craigslist, don't only limit your search to listings that say, "dogs ok," because I've found several units that allow dogs that never said this in the original listing. This mostly applies for listings that don't mention pets at all--as for the ones that *specifically* say "no pets" or "no dogs," you're probably wasting your time.

There's a lot of asking involved; usually (if you're taking your chances and calling about a listing that doesn't mention pets), the first thing the landlord/manager/etc will ask is, "What kind of dog?" or, more annoyingly, "What size dog?" A lot of the time, they're willing to consider it. Especially if it's a small dog (which I don't get, myself, because most small dogs I know behave worse than most big dogs I know).

Another trick I know of is to contact your vet--if s/he's cool like that--and get him/her to provide a form fudging on the dog's breed. This is probably only necessary if it's a large breed that people tend to to be wary of: pit bulls, german shepherds, etc. We got the vet to write down that our dog (pit, german shep, dobie mutt) is a Manchester Terrier mix. Once people hear "terrier," they get relieved. That's discriminating crap, but, well, that's the system.

It also comes down to how much you're willing to spend on rent (in addition to what kind of dog you have). If you're looking for a studio under $1000, it's probably going to be tougher than looking for a 2-bedroom you can share with a roommate.

I'll be honest: if you have a big dog and/or can't spend a lot, you're going to hear "No, sorry" a lot. But if you stay with it you'll find something for you and your doggie. And, like someone in the pets forum told me, thanks for not getting rid of your dog like many other people do (I think moving might be the #1 reason people give up their dogs for adoption. Sue me if I'm wrong).
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Old 07-09-2007, 05:15 PM
 
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Woofenstein, you're absolutely right. I work in pug rescue and, the number 2 reason for surrendering the dog (number 1 is, 'I didn't know how expensive it is to have a dog.') is that either they're moving or the landlord wants the pug out. A PUG! So if they don't like 20 pound dogs, I can't imagine how they'd feel about a larger one!
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Old 07-09-2007, 07:59 PM
 
122 posts, read 756,160 times
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Shouldn't it be illegal to just demand that your tenants get rid of their dog after x-amount of months on the lease? That's kind of extreme. Pets should be in the contract somewhere so that kind of thing doesn't happen. Scary.
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Old 07-10-2007, 04:47 AM
 
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If there is proof that a dog has been living in a residence, with the knowlege of the manager, for three months, that dog may stay. What constitutes proof? Used in the past, most frequently, is a picture with the dog, owner and superintendent, with a newspaper from a specific day....
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Old 07-10-2007, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
956 posts, read 4,147,530 times
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We found a good home for our dog before we moved to NYC. It made it much easier to find a place to live. It also gave us more flexibility. Didn't have to worry about walking the dog at night in an ice storm etc. Didn't have to rush home afraid the dog would crap all over the apt.
However, as a single female in the city a dog can be great company and give you a sense of security.
I have a co-worker who just moved to the City from Cali. She has a dog, and is having a problem finding a dog-friendly apartment that isn't crap in a crappy building.
Good luck.
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Old 07-10-2007, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Bergen County, NJ
9,856 posts, read 23,015,662 times
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You also have to worry about whether your type of dog is good for your apartment. Generally bigger dogs and apartments don't mix well. It is much easier to have a really small dog that doesn't require a lot of outdoor activity or a cat. I used to not like cats but I've been converted. I love both now.
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Old 07-10-2007, 10:46 AM
 
7,079 posts, read 35,542,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NooYowkur81 View Post
You also have to worry about whether your type of dog is good for your apartment. Generally bigger dogs and apartments don't mix well. It is much easier to have a really small dog that doesn't require a lot of outdoor activity or a cat. I used to not like cats but I've been converted. I love both now.
This is absolutely NOT true. Greyhounds and great Danes are both incredible couch potatoes. And little Jack Russell terriers (now officially Parson Russell terriers) are probably one of the WORST apartment dogs known to man. It depends on the breed of dog. We've had big and little dogs in our apartment and, if the breed is appropriate, there's no problem. Dogs that are 'busy' and need a 'job' such as Parson Russells, border collies, fox terriers (most terriers, actually) are NOT good apartment dogs.

There are more Parson Russell terriers in rescue than anyone knows what too do with, all because of 'Moose' (who was 'Eddie'on 'Frasier'). And the only reason THAT dog was so well behaved is because he was kept busy working ALL DAY. His trainer rescued him from euthanasia. He was going to be put down because he was getting into trouble at home with his original owners: destructive and a perpetual motion machine.

It depends on the breed of the dog.
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