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Old 12-09-2010, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
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Okay, so I'm going to be in New York City with my daughter from Saturday, December 18 through Monday, December 20 -- not much time, I know, but we've both been there before and have spent most of our time in Manhattan in the past. I am (a very young) 62 and she is 28. I actually have been to the Bronx Zoo and to two Yankees games (one in the old stadium, one in the new one -- liked the old one better). I've also spent an afternoon shopping in Dumbo. We both like to shop, we both like art, and we both like good food. If we were to spend half of our trip (i.e. a full day and a half) in one or more of the other boroughs, what would you suggest we do?
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Old 12-09-2010, 06:24 PM
 
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Since you like art.....my suggestion isn't in a non-Manhattan borough, but it's certainly "off the beaten path." Have you ever been to The Cloisters in waaay upper Manhattan? It is beautiful. Medeival art collection in a series of cloisters that were brought over from Europe. On gorgeous, hilly, rocky land in Fort Tyron Park- you can almost picture what "New Amsterdam" looked like in the 1600's when it was still inhabited by Indians. It's also part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, so you can use one ticket for both if you go on the same day.

Or, totally going in another direction, Brooklyn Heights is one of my very favorite neighborhoods in the entire city. Best view of DT Manhattan from the promenade, gorgeous tree-line streets filled with brownstones and other churches/ homes/ public buildings with historical markers. Cute little main street for shopping and eating.

Or act like a native and explore residential Park Slope (great indie boutiques/ restaurants/ coffee shops along 7th Avenue) and Prospect Park. The Brooklyn Museum of Art and Botanical Gardens are in/near the park.
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Old 12-09-2010, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Parkway,The Bronx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
..............................

Or, totally going in another direction, Brooklyn Heights is one of my very favorite neighborhoods in the entire city. Best view of DT Manhattan from the promenade, gorgeous tree-line streets filled with brownstones and other churches/ homes/ public buildings with historical markers. Cute little main street for shopping and eating.

Or act like a native and explore residential Park Slope (great indie boutiques/ restaurants/ coffee shops along 7th Avenue) and Prospect Park. The Brooklyn Museum of Art and Botanical Gardens are in/near the park.
Good suggestion.I'd recommend a whole day and see all of the above... or as much of it as possible.If it's not too cold I'd start in Brooklyn Heights( or by walking over the Brooklyn Bridge to the Heights) and then walk down through Cobble Hill,Atlantic Ave,Carroll Gardens and then over to Park Slope,Prospect Park and the Museum with a few pit stops along the way..A really full day.Lots of walking but a delight to the senses !

The cloisters is nice but there isn't too much else up there with the exception of a few nice residential areas.

Not for this time of year, but another full day trip (in Summer) could be to the Bronx Zoo,Little Italy on Arthur Ave and 187th Street and The New York Botanical Garden.The Zoo and Botanical Garden are adjacent to each other and Little Italy is only about 5 blocks away from either.Zoo in the AM,lunch in Little Italy and then The Botanical Garden in the afternoon/evening.

Last edited by bluedog2; 12-09-2010 at 07:09 PM..
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Old 12-10-2010, 05:36 AM
 
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The suggestions for Brooklyn are excellent. Another option is to visit the Museum of Moving Image in Astoria, Queens. Astoria also has lots of small stores for shopping and good ethnic restaurants.
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Old 12-10-2010, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post
Since you like art.....my suggestion isn't in a non-Manhattan borough, but it's certainly "off the beaten path." Have you ever been to The Cloisters in waaay upper Manhattan? It is beautiful. Medeival art collection in a series of cloisters that were brought over from Europe. On gorgeous, hilly, rocky land in Fort Tyron Park- you can almost picture what "New Amsterdam" looked like in the 1600's when it was still inhabited by Indians. It's also part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, so you can use one ticket for both if you go on the same day.
I have been to the Met several times, but have never made it to the Cloisters. I love Medieval art, though, and I've always wanted to go. I've just never heard anybody say much about it, so it's wonderful to have a first-hand opinion of it. Thank you!

Or, totally going in another direction, Brooklyn Heights is one of my very favorite neighborhoods in the entire city. Best view of DT Manhattan from the promenade, gorgeous tree-line streets filled with brownstones and other churches/ homes/ public buildings with historical markers. Cute little main street for shopping and eating.

Or act like a native and explore residential Park Slope (great indie boutiques/ restaurants/ coffee shops along 7th Avenue) and Prospect Park. The Brooklyn Museum of Art and Botanical Gardens are in/near the park.[/quote]These sounds wonderful!
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Old 12-10-2010, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
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Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
The suggestions for Brooklyn are excellent. Another option is to visit the Museum of Moving Image in Astoria, Queens. Astoria also has lots of small stores for shopping and good ethnic restaurants.
Two people have mentioned the Museum of Moving Image. The name is very intriguing! What on earth is it? (Or should I just google it? )
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Old 12-10-2010, 10:15 AM
grant516
 
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Museum of the Moving Image is a great place to go but it is CLOSED until mid January.

I don't understand going to see the other boroughs out of principle.

If you are very interested in Art, and Shopping- Manhattan has the most, hands down.
Since the gallery scene is constantly rotating there is plenty you may have never seen before.
For the absolute easiest winter shopping, take the MNR to the Westchester in White Plains, or go to Long Island's Roosevelt Field if you want to shop, outside of the cold.

Food is a matter of taste.
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Old 12-10-2010, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC & New York
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If you want a condensed version of upscale Manhattan stores in an open-air environment, I would go to Manhasset, but not with the short amount of time you have available. Same with Roosevelt Field and White Plains, since you would have to get from the train station to the mall in both places.

For a more modern art museum, visit the Noguchi Museum in Queens. You can even get the museum's free shuttle bus from Manhattan.

Hours & Admission | The Noguchi Museum

I would also agree with The Cloisters, and the New York Botanical Garden has a very interesting exhibit -- the holiday train show. The train show has some trains, but the main attraction is landmarks (past and present) of New York created in miniature out of natural materials (leaves, fungus, and sticks). They are works of art, and worth a visit if you're in The Bronx.
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Old 12-10-2010, 11:17 AM
 
Location: southwest TN
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If you haven't been, I suggest going over to Liberty and Ellis Islands and perhaps a trip to Governor's Island - I think it is again open to the public.

A side note, I had to look up Dumbo (not the elephant). I never heard of that one before.
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Old 12-10-2010, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC & New York
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Governor's Island is open, but not at this time of year. It's seasonal, during the summer, and has had hosted some interesting public art exhibitions and special events. The ferry to it is free from the South Ferry Terminal, and the island will reopen in the Spring. The recent schedule was Saturday, Sunday, and some holidays, IIRC.

Liberty and Ellis Islands are great suggestions, and I have found it faster in recent weeks to take the ferry from NJ - Liberty State Park as the lines can be quite long on the Manhattan side. Liberty State Park is accessible via PATH train from Manhattan to the light rail at Exchange Place in Jersey City. The light rail has a stop at the park, where a shuttle bus meets the train to take you to the dock.
__________________
All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages.
~William Shakespeare
(As You Like It Act II, Scene VII)

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