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Old 04-30-2011, 11:20 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,809 times
Reputation: 10

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Hey everyone,

First, I do realize that there has already been many threads of this nature as well as a sticky devoted to the topic. However, the other threads that I've read do not seem to fit my situation and the sticky is far too long. So please excuse the somewhat redundant thread.

My soon-to-be wife and I will be moving to New York City in the summer from LA. I will be working in Gramercy around 23rd and Madison and she will be in Midtown around 41st and Madison. Due to the long hours required of my job, it is essential that we live in Manhattan, and preferably closer to my work than hers. We have a budget of $2500 and are looking for either a studio or a one bedroom. With the above in mind, I was hoping to have a few questions answered:

1. Given the location of my work, our top choice of neighborhoods are Gramercy, Murray Hill, and East Village. However, we are also intrigued by the lower prices on the Upper East Side. What do you guys think about the commute from the UES to my work and would it be worth the better deals?

2. What are the pros and cons of broker vs. no broker vs. no-fee broker? Obviously we would prefer to not have to pay a broker fee, but is it possible to find a good place without one? We are planning a 3 day trip to NYC to look at apartments, but other than that, we don't really have the luxury of walking around neighborhoods and just asking the building manager if they have vacancies.

3. I've heard that a lot of what's on Craiglist are scams. What are some other websites we should check out?

Thank you all so much in advance for your help.
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Old 05-01-2011, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
25,387 posts, read 37,130,658 times
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Being an out-of-towner and having limited time to search, I recommend you take whatever you find and live here for a year's lease-time. In that time you will be able to better understand what you really want in a New York home.
Some of us have spent YEARS trying to find a good fit. The longer you look the better your chance of finding a good apartment at a good price...or at least a tolerable apartment at a tolerable price.

Do not be too swayed by the bargains in the UES...the area is not cheaper than the others you are considering and some prices are beyond astronomical.

Since you both work on the East Side, proximity to the Lexington Avenue subway (4,5,6 trains) is a BIG plus because walking 3 or 4 avenues twice a day gets old fast.

You will eventually find a 1 bedroom for $2500 but not without compromises and a LOT of search time.

Good Luck.
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Old 05-01-2011, 09:35 AM
 
Location: NY,NY
2,896 posts, read 9,820,970 times
Reputation: 2074
Quote:
Originally Posted by 'Pac View Post
Hey everyone,

First, I do realize that there has already been many threads of this nature as well as a sticky devoted to the topic. However, the other threads that I've read do not seem to fit my situation and the sticky is far too long. So please excuse the somewhat redundant thread.
All of your questions can be answered by reading the forum. Time and effort is all that's required.

One thing I will say is that all you potential NYers really need to familiarize yourselves with the geography, and especially the 'nature' of the neighborhoods of this city,

For example, UES is a neighborhood as well as a physical/geograhic location. The UES is truuly the most expensive real estate in the city, and has great appeal. Because of this appeal the name is usurped and bandied about to mean somthing it is not.

Example, cheap rent on the UES is to be had in only two circumstances. One, in an area called Yorkville, which used to be primarily a German and working class area on the far east side. While it is technically on the UES it is a separate neighborhood. Those who want to profit from the reputation of the UES will present Yorkville as the UES, as if the fringe area has the same appeal---it does not.

Yorkville, today, is no longer a German, nor a working class neighborhood. Though some remnants remain. The reason rents in Yorkville are lower than, most of the rest of the UES is that, it is subway inconveniet, and has housing originally built for working class residents. Today much of this housing has been renovated/modernized, but still remaiins small in space, sometimes dark, but generally not appealing to the typical UES renter with a high income and standard.

The second instance of affordability on the UES is, generally, other ex-working class housing located here and there in specific spots mostly at the western and upper edge of the UES core, which is liberally from 5th Ave to Lexington, 59Th to 86th Street. In this area there are sporadic buildings which have low rents maintained by rental laws. Outside of this main area there is more of this housing.

It is this sort of housing and location, which you will find at seemingly affordable rents. But it is NOT *the* Upper East Side of Rockerfellers and Kennedys which is the normal NYer connotation.

So, when considering the UES, it is important to ask and comprehend where exactly is the location; and, that affordable UES rent comes with compromise, such as isolation and/or railroad apartments, just for example.
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Old 05-01-2011, 09:55 AM
 
420 posts, read 805,928 times
Reputation: 444
I would personally recommend Gramercy Park or Murray Hill (just stay west of 3rd Avenue, the neighborhood becomes very post-college east of 3rd Avenue). By living in Murray Hill, near 34th and Park for example (which is a very pretty and convinient area), you both would be able to walk to work which is a nice perk on nice days. And you have everything you would ever need very close by. For $2500/month you should be able to find a nice 1-bedroom or a large studio.

In terms of brokers, I would call up any real estate agency and specifically tell them that you are looking for a no-fee apartment (which means the owner of the apartment/building pays the broker fee).
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Old 05-01-2011, 10:38 AM
 
215 posts, read 519,950 times
Reputation: 115
UES is definitely cheaper than Murray Hill. You will have to live near 2nd or 1st ave though. Which is fine by me, walking to subway takes only around 5-10 minutes. It is good for your health to walk more!

For 2500 you should be able to get a 1 bedroom on Upper East Side in a relatively new building (not "working-class housing") with elevator, laundry and maybe doorman.
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Old 05-01-2011, 10:40 AM
 
215 posts, read 519,950 times
Reputation: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by PsychDoc View Post
I would personally recommend Gramercy Park or Murray Hill (just stay west of 3rd Avenue, the neighborhood becomes very post-college east of 3rd Avenue). By living in Murray Hill, near 34th and Park for example (which is a very pretty and convinient area), you both would be able to walk to work which is a nice perk on nice days. And you have everything you would ever need very close by. For $2500/month you should be able to find a nice 1-bedroom or a large studio.

In terms of brokers, I would call up any real estate agency and specifically tell them that you are looking for a no-fee apartment (which means the owner of the apartment/building pays the broker fee).
Nice 1br for 2500 on Park Avenue? You must be kidding.
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Old 05-02-2011, 06:10 PM
 
2 posts, read 3,809 times
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Thanks for the responses guys.

Any comments on commute time from UES (maybe mid 70's) to Madison and 23rd?
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Old 05-02-2011, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC & New York
10,914 posts, read 31,430,151 times
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The only thing to remember with an UES commute via the 4-5-6 during rush hour is that no scheduler is correct. Theoretically, if you're close to Lexington Avenue, the trip to 23rd Street should take about 15-20 minutes. The problem is that this line is very congested, and sometimes one has to wait to board a train. If you leave earlier in the morning, as opposed to peak times, it may not be as much of an issue for your commutes.

The buses that traverse this area, particularly the M101, can be convenient, but I don't think the local buses could outrun an approaching glacier, as they seem to stop every twenty feet. If you're on the far east UES, you could consider the M15 Select bus, which is a bit faster than a regular city bus because you pay before boarding, and the bus makes limited stops from the bus lane. It might be faster than walking to the subway and waiting, again depending upon the time of your commute, and how quickly you walk.
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Old 05-03-2011, 12:44 PM
 
2,848 posts, read 7,587,115 times
Reputation: 1673
Quote:
Due to the long hours required of my job, it is essential that we live in Manhattan, and preferably closer to my work than hers.
What kind of long hours? I would suggest you rethink only Manhattan and expand your search. Unless you prefer at least for your first year, being unfamiliar with the city and neighborhoods, to live in Manhattan at first. I lived in Manhattan for years thinking the same thing about being close to work, but my husband and I have now lived in Queens the last few years in a much bigger, more comfortable, more "home"-like apartment. I get to work between 7:30-8am and I am frequently in the office until nearly midnight or after, although some days are more 12 hour days. My commute is ~30 minutes door to door on the express train. Sometimes less, sometimes a few minutes more depending on the "train traffic ahead of us". For the saved money and more bang for your buck, I would keep the outer boroughs in your search.

As a side note, we actually never gave up our midtown Manhattan one bedroom apartment. We short-term sublet it, but rarely desire to stay there.

Quote:
What are the pros and cons of broker vs. no broker vs. no-fee broker?
You can sometimes use a broker without paying the fee, or feeling like you're paying it rather. I used a broker once where the apartment was throwing in a month free, so the one month fee I paid the broker felt like nothing when we didn't pay rent the first month. Other brokers also have No Fee listings.

Also be prepared to make an immediate decision on an apartment. You can say you'll decide over a cup of coffee in the afternoon, but in that hour, the apartment may be grabbed by someone else. Being from out of town and only visiting for a few days for your search, you unfortunately don't have too much flexibility.

Quote:
I've heard that a lot of what's on Craiglist are scams. What are some other websites we should check out?
You can usually tell which listings on Craigslist are scams. You can also go to some buildings websites directly to see what is available. There are plenty of no fee rental websites.


Good luck. Be realistic and realize every first place is a compromise in some way, and you'll be fine.
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Old 06-23-2015, 11:21 PM
 
31,957 posts, read 27,093,183 times
Reputation: 24864
Quote:
Originally Posted by 'Pac View Post
Hey everyone,

First, I do realize that there has already been many threads of this nature as well as a sticky devoted to the topic. However, the other threads that I've read do not seem to fit my situation and the sticky is far too long. So please excuse the somewhat redundant thread.

My soon-to-be wife and I will be moving to New York City in the summer from LA. I will be working in Gramercy around 23rd and Madison and she will be in Midtown around 41st and Madison. Due to the long hours required of my job, it is essential that we live in Manhattan, and preferably closer to my work than hers. We have a budget of $2500 and are looking for either a studio or a one bedroom. With the above in mind, I was hoping to have a few questions answered:

1. Given the location of my work, our top choice of neighborhoods are Gramercy, Murray Hill, and East Village. However, we are also intrigued by the lower prices on the Upper East Side. What do you guys think about the commute from the UES to my work and would it be worth the better deals?

2. What are the pros and cons of broker vs. no broker vs. no-fee broker? Obviously we would prefer to not have to pay a broker fee, but is it possible to find a good place without one? We are planning a 3 day trip to NYC to look at apartments, but other than that, we don't really have the luxury of walking around neighborhoods and just asking the building manager if they have vacancies.

3. I've heard that a lot of what's on Craiglist are scams. What are some other websites we should check out?

Thank you all so much in advance for your help.
Have lived on the UES for years and worked on the Eastside, your commute will be fine.

The IRT runs down Lexington Avenue then Park Avenue South (below Grand Central Terminal) and stops at 23rd Street and Park Avenue South. You can then just walk one block west to Madison.

Yes, the local (#6 train) is pretty packed but the new Second Avenue Subway when it opens should take some of the pressure off.

Going home if you don't want to take the train and or depending on where on the UES you land an apartment there is bus service both "Limited" (fewer stops) and local that runs north on Madison Avenue right through the UES. You can also walk over to Third Avenue and again take a bus north.

Housing wise you'll probably get more for your money on the UES if you look at Yorkville (roughly starting at 79th Street and Third Avenue going north to 96th Street, then from Third Avenue to York or East End. Here you will find a mix of rentals with everything from walk up tenements to high rise buildings with elevator, doorman... that is a full service building.

Broker vs. not using one; the choice is up to you. However if you aren't familiar with NYC/Manhattan and have a limited amount of time to look there are benefits to having someone do the legwork. Using a good broker will allow you to arrive and hit the ground running as it were; with apartments lined up for you to see. The broker will also "know" (or should) what the LL is looking for in terms of a tenant. A broker will also have all your information collected (employment, wage, references, etc... ) ready to present to a LL.

This being said have passed countless high rise buildings all over the UES/Yorkville that have "apartments for rent" signs out front. Some even add "luxury"! *LOL*

These are usually buildings owned/managed by the large real estate/property owners such as Glenwood, Douglas Elliman, Related and so forth

Glenwood Rental Apartments in Manhattan, New York; Affordable luxury apartment rentals in New York City's most desirable neighborhoods

New York, South Florida, California, Connecticut and Aspen Real Estate | Douglas Elliman

Related Real Estate, Apartments For Rent & Condos


These all have in house leasing offices/contacts that usually deal with both brokers and the public directly, that is they have in-house brokers.
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