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Old 06-25-2011, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Ohio
13,900 posts, read 11,989,960 times
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There is no other city in the world like NYC and everyone should be so lucky as to experience it atleast once in their life. It has always been a very successful city and there are many people who would like to live there, but sadly, few can what with the cost of living being one of if not the highest in the country. The city is filled with educated , affluent, and powerfull people with even more powerfull jobs and careers, and this is what drives that C-O-L up so high. I realise that this may keep an " only-the-elite " citizenship, but isnt it sort of unfair for the average person who would love to enjoy working and living in what is argueably the greatest city in the world? The fact is that the average person, with an average education, pretty much has no chance of making it there.

What do you all think?
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Old 06-25-2011, 11:28 PM
 
551 posts, read 1,085,526 times
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I have to agree with you here. There are very big downsides to being too successful as a city that I feel very sorry for NYC's less affulent residents. Having many rich and famous people in NYC can be a glamourous thing but too much without limits can quickly make it unlivable.
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Old 06-26-2011, 05:26 AM
 
3,324 posts, read 4,177,981 times
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Maybe that's true for Manhattan or parts of Brooklyn, but regular people make sacrifices to live there too (like really small apartments/roomates etc.) Last night I saw a lady on TV who's whole apartment was 90 square feet. Regular people also can live pretty well in less expensive parts of the city, but these parts aren't cool, so some people talk like they don't even exist.
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Old 06-26-2011, 07:20 AM
 
90 posts, read 193,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
Maybe that's true for Manhattan or parts of Brooklyn, but regular people make sacrifices to live there too (like really small apartments/roomates etc.) Last night I saw a lady on TV who's whole apartment was 90 square feet. Regular people also can live pretty well in less expensive parts of the city, but these parts aren't cool, so some people talk like they don't even exist.
Nail on head!

It's like a lot of these transplants live in an alternate reality where they can only see a narrow range of companies to work at and neighborhoods to live in. I am a landlord in two unfabulous neighborhoods (Borough Park and Gravesend) and an employer in an unfabulous industry (beverage wholesale). To read this forum you would think there was a waiting list a mile long for decent jobs and decent apartments. And yet I had a vacancy in one of my units for several months last year and my company had to hire a temp for two months even though we were advertising an admin position in Manhattan with excellent pay and a Cadillac health plan! And the girl we did ultimately hire gets flak from her transplant pals for working in a warehouse! Bad craziness, I tell you.
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Old 06-26-2011, 07:58 AM
 
Location: NY,NY
2,896 posts, read 9,267,376 times
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Your rental problem had more to do with coinciding with financial/mortgage mess, than anytthing else.

In Astoria, a hot area, the same thing occurred and frankly in the older buildings things are only mildly better.

Also, the fact that you think of your employee as a "girl" may have something to do with it. Also, any career opportunity?

If I saw your ad, I'd think gum poping, not too bright, local native woman, working to supplement her city government worker husband's salary. Isn't that sort of atypical? Problem is those sorts are becoming harder to find as they have, for the greater part, left the city for suburban parts.

I don't think your girl's transplant friends' attitude is too different than a white collar native's attitude would be.

I think what you are experiencing is just the shrinking of the blue collar (even if they work white collar) white ethnic NYC world.

Might find candidates within the Russians of Brighton Beach/Sheepshead Bay or the eastern Euros in Astoria. Reaching them may mean an ad in their native language paper or web site.
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Old 06-26-2011, 08:18 AM
 
90 posts, read 193,105 times
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Originally Posted by jcoltrane View Post
s.

I don't think your girl's transplant friends' attitude is too different than a white collar native's attitude would be.
Oh? Being the son of a dentist and a psychotherapist, having a college degree, and working in upper management I think I qualify as a "white collar native" no? And I would never disparage anyone who does honest work, in a warehouse or anywhere else, because said dentist and therapist didn't raise me in a barnyard.
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Old 06-26-2011, 08:51 AM
 
7 posts, read 10,352 times
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I think history has shown that the affluence of different parts of the city ebbs and flows over time, but yes, the most popular parts of the city are really not an option for most normal people. I think it's an exaggeration to say that normal people can't make it here, however. You just have to be willing to consider a wider range of neighborhoods, and judge them for yourself.

I do wish the city would do more to encourage mixed-income neighborhoods, as well as to strengthen and expand rent stabilization. We need a bulwark against gentrification. The flipside of a cleaner, safer neighborhood shouldn't be that it is uninhabitable for its original residents.
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Old 06-26-2011, 09:12 AM
 
Location: New York City
1,556 posts, read 3,345,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhipperSnapper 88 View Post
There is no other city in the world like NYC and everyone should be so lucky as to experience it atleast once in their life. It has always been a very successful city and there are many people who would like to live there, but sadly, few can what with the cost of living being one of if not the highest in the country. The city is filled with educated , affluent, and powerfull people with even more powerfull jobs and careers, and this is what drives that C-O-L up so high. I realise that this may keep an " only-the-elite " citizenship, but isnt it sort of unfair for the average person who would love to enjoy working and living in what is argueably the greatest city in the world? The fact is that the average person, with an average education, pretty much has no chance of making it there.

What do you all think?
Check out my post on the "would you encourage people to move to NYC thread"! Yes it is unfair that this city is quickly turning into a place where only the rich will be able to live...but life is not fair. With popularity comes demand to live here....with demand to live here comes skyrocketing prices and ridiculous cost of living. Regarding whether or not the average person can live here......sure, I know a lot of average people who live here (they were born here) but the real question is do they live well here? The answer is no! This is why I said in the other thread.....you need to be above average to live here (good paying job).

We are to blame for why the cost of living is so high in this city. NY is a big state, there is plenty of room upstate NY (above West Chester county) that can be developed but us New Yorkers would rather continue to live over 8 million in the 5 boroughs and complain about how expensive it is here. Just like it took NYC many years to become the city it is today and somebody had to develop it.....the same can be done in upstate NY. There is more than enough room in this state for everybody to live...if people will begin to think outside the box.
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Old 06-26-2011, 09:17 AM
 
Location: New York City
1,556 posts, read 3,345,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lonesome_dove View Post
I think history has shown that the affluence of different parts of the city ebbs and flows over time, but yes, the most popular parts of the city are really not an option for most normal people. I think it's an exaggeration to say that normal people can't make it here, however. You just have to be willing to consider a wider range of neighborhoods, and judge them for yourself.

I do wish the city would do more to encourage mixed-income neighborhoods, as well as to strengthen and expand rent stabilization. We need a bulwark against gentrification. The flipside of a cleaner, safer neighborhood shouldn't be that it is uninhabitable for its original residents.
The only way to fix the high cost of living here is for some of the over 8 million who live in the 5 boroughs to move someplace else. Lower demand to live here will mean lower cost of living. Until people move someplace else and the population numbers in this city goes down nothing is going to change. Too many people are becoming rich off of the demand of people who want to live here!
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Old 06-26-2011, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Ohio
13,900 posts, read 11,989,960 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonesome_dove View Post
I think history has shown that the affluence of different parts of the city ebbs and flows over time, but yes, the most popular parts of the city are really not an option for most normal people. I think it's an exaggeration to say that normal people can't make it here, however. You just have to be willing to consider a wider range of neighborhoods, and judge them for yourself.

I do wish the city would do more to encourage mixed-income neighborhoods, as well as to strengthen and expand rent stabilization. We need a bulwark against gentrification. The flipside of a cleaner, safer neighborhood shouldn't be that it is uninhabitable for its original residents.
Something you have to define is, what is normal for NYC? What is normal for NYC may not be normal for other parts of the country. For example, here in Ohio, " normal " is the middle class, blue collar, hard working family who make enough at their factory jobs or what have you you to support an average family of four to five and pay the mortage on their house. They live comfortably, but certainly not extravagantly. I have a feeling that normal in NYC is very diffrent, probly comparable to lower class in most other parts of the country.
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