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Old 10-28-2011, 11:09 AM
 
2,247 posts, read 6,999,710 times
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I'm not a native to the area, but I find the local dialect here interesting. One feature I find particularly interesting is r-dropping after certain words.

I think I have it down to a system now.

The "r" is pronounced only
-if the word immediately after begins with an "r", OR
-if the word immediately after begins with a vowel.

Would you say this is true?
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Old 10-28-2011, 11:37 AM
 
8,743 posts, read 18,309,945 times
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I am a native New Yorker, and I find the native dialects disturbing. For the length of time I have lived here, I realized I have little to no friends which have the thick NY accents. And when I do hear them, I typically stay away. You have to wonder how someone can be 30+ years olde and still have such a thick accent...have you never left a 3 block radius around your home? Don't you associate with people outside your 3 blocks radius?

I of course have an accent, as most native NYers should have some sort of accent, but the "New Yawkah" extreme accent is disturbing.
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Old 10-28-2011, 11:51 AM
 
Location: BX
340 posts, read 1,181,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
I'm not a native to the area, but I find the local dialect here interesting. One feature I find particularly interesting is r-dropping after certain words.

I think I have it down to a system now.

The "r" is pronounced only
-if the word immediately after begins with an "r", OR
-if the word immediately after begins with a vowel.

Would you say this is true?
This is not true. The majority of us pronounce the "r"
u r talking about a small amount of people.
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Old 10-28-2011, 11:52 AM
 
2,848 posts, read 7,549,868 times
Reputation: 1672
Quote:
Originally Posted by SobroGuy View Post
I am a native New Yorker, and I find the native dialects disturbing. For the length of time I have lived here, I realized I have little to no friends which have the thick NY accents. And when I do hear them, I typically stay away. You have to wonder how someone can be 30+ years olde and still have such a thick accent...have you never left a 3 block radius around your home? Don't you associate with people outside your 3 blocks radius?

I of course have an accent, as most native NYers should have some sort of accent, but the "New Yawkah" extreme accent is disturbing.

Not commenting on the accent itself, but I can understand the accent sticking.

My grandmother moved from Ireland to the Bronx when she was 16 years old. Up until the day she died at 94 years old, she had a thick Irish brogue.

Funny story - once when in elementary school, my father, who speaks with a slight "Bronx" accent if you would even call it that, was told by his coach, who had called home recently, "What a nice brogue your mother has!" My father, surprised, responded "My mother has an accent???"


I had a problem with the sound "th" growing up. Would say things like "tirdy tird street" instead of "Thirty third". I was sent to speech therapy along with my sister to correct this!
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Old 10-28-2011, 11:58 AM
 
8,743 posts, read 18,309,945 times
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I don't think we can use grandmother's as an example, because it seems that everyone's grandmothers perpetually had accents (assuming they were from some other country), mine included. In fact, mine refused to speak english and never spoke to anyone in English until her dying day. If you wanted to talk to grandma, you better know Spanish...and she lived in this country for decades since she was 25 or so and raised all her children here!
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Old 10-28-2011, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Bronx
16,200 posts, read 22,928,658 times
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New yorkers tend to drop the r from er and ir verbs. Example fire is pronounced firah, watah,Moderator cut: Inappropriate language

Last edited by bmwguydc; 10-28-2011 at 01:23 PM.. Reason: Inappropriate language
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Old 10-28-2011, 01:07 PM
 
4,947 posts, read 10,769,082 times
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What are going on here?
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Old 10-28-2011, 01:27 PM
 
168 posts, read 521,835 times
Reputation: 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
I'm not a native to the area, but I find the local dialect here interesting. One feature I find particularly interesting is r-dropping after certain words.

I think I have it down to a system now.

The "r" is pronounced only
-if the word immediately after begins with an "r", OR
-if the word immediately after begins with a vowel.

Would you say this is true?
I think that's a pretty silly stereotype, and find it to be the exception to the norm (i.e. you rarely hear this anymore). Nevertheless, here is an interesting bit from the times that's on point: Unlearning to Tawk Like a New Yorker - NYTimes.com
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Old 10-28-2011, 01:42 PM
 
124 posts, read 218,696 times
Reputation: 92
I don't get why people are ashamed of an accent or would want to get rid of it...it's part of who you are! It shows the region your from, no need to get rid of that! I'm ridiculed all the time for the accent I have by family and friends but you know what, it's because of where I grew up and I'm proud of that.

I read someone say they went to speech therapy for not saying the th...man 90% of Chicago needs speech therapy apparently haha.
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Old 10-28-2011, 10:09 PM
 
Location: NY,NY
2,896 posts, read 9,775,102 times
Reputation: 2074
Quote:
Originally Posted by SobroGuy View Post
I don't think we can use grandmother's as an example, because it seems that everyone's grandmothers perpetually had accents (assuming they were from some other country), mine included. In fact, mine refused to speak english and never spoke to anyone in English until her dying day. If you wanted to talk to grandma, you better know Spanish...and she lived in this country for decades since she was 25 or so and raised all her children here!
Lets not be hypocritical, and count Grandmas. All I have to say is this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by SobroGuy View Post
You have to wonder how someone can be 30+ years olde and still have such a thick accent...have you never left a 3 block radius around your home? Don't you associate with people outside your 3 blocks radius?
Of which I wholeheartedly agree, particularly when it comes to speaking English! It s/b a Green Card requirement.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SobroGuy View Post
I of course have an accent, as most native NYers should have some sort of accent, but the "New Yawkah" extreme accent is disturbing.
WHAT sort of non-disturbing accent should that be?

Fortunately, in my family, and in my neighborhood, and among my contemporaries, ENGLISH was the *only* accent and the only acceptable accent!

****

NY accent, another failure of the NYC public school system. Ever listen to some of these public school teachers??? Unbelieveable, and these are the people teaching and exampling for the children of this city. The capability to speak proper English s/b a requirement for a teaching license. One 'dem' or 'dose' and you're fired!
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