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Old 12-26-2020, 09:36 AM
 
3,357 posts, read 4,640,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dfc99 View Post
True but NYC's safest neighborhoods tend to be those far from the subway. Especially now with crime on the increase it's a consideration. The criminal element uses the subways to get around unfortunately. Staten Island has no subway connection and new 2-family homes sell in the $1M range. I understand why in the rental market being near the subway is a big plus. In the private house market being near the subway can be a negative.


Depending on the neighborhood owning a car in NYC can be a headache, yet more New Yorkers are buying cars for a lot of reasons. The pandemic, subway crime, personal mobility.


NYC vehicle ownership stats (pdf) - - http://u.pc.cd/8M2
Not needing a car is one of the most important criteria for me in where to live. If I was going to live somewhere where one was needed, I'd pick somewhere less expensive because needing one is common in the US. Areas where you don't need to drive are big exceptions in this country.

I tend to disagree with the bolded. Areas where house prices have really exploded in Brooklyn are all accessible by public transit.
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Old 12-26-2020, 10:02 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
I think the photo you posted is beautiful. You'd posted it before and we had wanted to walk over there last summer and couldn't find it on street view because I didn't know the name. Actually, could you post a streetview link because I was just looking and still can't find it.

This has to be close by, but it's the kind of development that isn't what I prefer:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8823...7i16384!8i8192

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8789...7i16384!8i8192

Some of this is very green - I'm not saying they're all eyesores but I prefer the pattern of development more prevalent in Upper Manhattan and some parts of the West Bronx.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8712...7i16384!8i8192

The above is Inwood, one of my favorite neighborhoods but I think you dislike it so different strokes for different folks.
The address is 2501 Palisade Avenue. There is a park nearby which if open you can sit and have nice views of the Hudson. When it gets warmer, I'm sure more people will go to look.

A lot of the buildings you are referencing were built in the 50s, 60s or even 70s, but they were built to draw the middle class and upper middle class, hence amenities like balconies and such. The plus is that they are large inside. I know some people that live in Hudson Heights. One of them owns a co-op. Sunken in living room. Gut renovated. Looks great. Here's an example:

https://streeteasy.com/building/720-...york/6j?card=1
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Old 12-26-2020, 10:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
Not needing a car is one of the most important criteria for me in where to live. If I was going to live somewhere where one was needed, I'd pick somewhere less expensive because needing one is common in the US. Areas where you don't need to drive are big exceptions in this country.

I tend to disagree with the bolded. Areas where house prices have really exploded in Brooklyn are all accessible by public transit.
What he's saying may have been true in 1970, but things are so much different now. Being near a subway is at worst neutral and at best quite positive in terms of real estate.
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Old 12-26-2020, 10:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
The address is 2501 Palisade Avenue. There is a park nearby which if open you can sit and have nice views of the Hudson. When it gets warmer, I'm sure more people will go to look.

A lot of the buildings you are referencing were built in the 50s, 60s or even 70s, but they were built to draw the middle class and upper middle class, hence amenities like balconies and such. The plus is that they are large inside. I know some people that live in Hudson Heights. One of them owns a co-op. Sunken in living room. Gut renovated. Looks great. Here's an example:

https://streeteasy.com/building/720-...york/6j?card=1
I thought most of the buildings in those areas were built earlier but that is also one of my favorite neighborhoods. You'll notice I like areas without many houses but want to live in one!

I had an apartment like that in Inwood with a sunken living room. It was lovely. That 2 bedroom is about the price of a Victorian house like the one I posted earlier on Perry in Bedford Park so I'd choose the house hands down.

Or you could buy three 2 br 1 bath coops on Mosholu Parkway for less than what you'd pay for that 2 br 1 bath apartment in Hudson Heights.

https://www.zillow.com/b/Bronx-NY/40...-73.882254_ll/

This is the place you were talking about in Riverdale. It's too bad about the tall buildings on either side but worth walking over one day.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8804...7i16384!8i8192

Last edited by yodel; 12-26-2020 at 10:57 AM..
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Old 12-26-2020, 10:21 AM
 
3,357 posts, read 4,640,176 times
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Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
What he's saying may have been true in 1970, but things are so much different now. Being near a subway is at worst neutral and at best quite positive in terms of real estate.
Yup, I agree
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Old 12-26-2020, 10:22 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
12,792 posts, read 8,337,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
What he's saying may have been true in 1970, but things are so much different now. Being near a subway is at worst neutral and at best quite positive in terms of real estate.
It's still true now. Being near a subway isn't such a big deal now. One thing that has happened with the mass exodus of people leaving is the areas away from the subways have held their value, while others have seen huge dips in prices, so those areas have not seen prices dip much at all. Stability in prices is a good thing.
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Old 12-26-2020, 11:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pierrepont7731 View Post
It's still true now. Being near a subway isn't such a big deal now. One thing that has happened with the mass exodus of people leaving is the areas away from the subways have held their value, while others have seen huge dips in prices, so those areas have not seen prices dip much at all. Stability in prices is a good thing.
Where have the huge price dips been? I thought I remembered hearing that in brownstone Brooklyn, for one, prices hadn't gone down at all.
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Old 12-26-2020, 11:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
Where have the huge price dips been? I thought I remembered hearing that in brownstone Brooklyn, for one, prices hadn't gone down at all.
Harlem
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Old 12-26-2020, 11:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by SeventhFloor View Post
Harlem
Oh I see, thank you. I still think that if price reductions were because of the subway, you'd see them throughout neighborhoods with subway access.
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Old 12-26-2020, 12:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by yodel View Post
Oh I see, thank you. I still think that if price reductions were because of the subway, you'd see them throughout neighborhoods with subway access.
I would assume that any price dips are purely due to covid
We'll see how things are 2 years from now
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