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Old 11-08-2012, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Chicago
6,359 posts, read 8,109,584 times
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One would be foolish to rush to judgement on Sandy some sort of a pronouncement of the new climate of New York City. But one can't escape that Sandy gives a picture of what may be happening to conditions on the northeast coast that manmade climate change would appear to be creating. even the city's mayor looks at this as "the new reality" and says basically "get used to it".

question is, if things are really changing along the Atlantic, what are the implications for NYC and the whole NY metro area? What does it mean to both if Atlantic storms, some of hurricane force, become a regularity, not the once-in-a-100-years occurrence they once were?

New York is said to be the second most vulnerable city on our coasts, right after New Orleans, in terms of potential storm damage. That narrow of the bay can create surges of water that end up going north into both the Hudson and the East River and affect prime shoreline real estate in Manhattan, the other boroughs, and in New Jersey. The subways and all underground utilities are sitting ducks for major damage.

How does New York face these issues? Can it or should it or is it even feasible to build the kind of defense systems and barriers that slightly inland cities like London utilize on the Thames? And if these things are not possible, how does New York keep its functionality and prime position among global cities if huge storms become the norm.

New York is an incredibly great city and one I hope will be able to deal with the "new realities". but it will need to be bold in its thinking and invest properly. and it won't be alone. cities around the globe will have to get used to these new realities. and since the living patterns of this modern world are heavily tied into coastal real estate, these coastal areas globe wide will have to come to grips with these changes, changes that appear to be happening in real time. one has to wonder if NYC can carry on its business oriented activities if it acquires a set of storm characteristics that are more akin to Miami than a city on the northeast.

Sandy was a tragedy. But at least, IMHO, it is getting people to talk more seriously about man made climate change and what we need to do about it. Without those discussions and actions taken, NYC....and all of us....are screwed. Our old reality just isn't going to work any more in this brave new world.
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Old 11-08-2012, 10:21 AM
 
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We need to look at how Floridians prepare and and manage their infrastructure, their used to withstanding way harsher Hurricanes than Sandy without it causing even half the damage.
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Old 11-08-2012, 10:50 AM
 
3,808 posts, read 4,645,400 times
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If the climate change Al Gore wants you to believe is real, it wouldn't matter about fixing things since we'll all be dead and cooked in a few years.

If it becomes a once a year occurrence, you just prep it out.

I don't think this storm is anything that much out of the ordinary, just happened to suck and hit here and NJ. It does happen every so often. Periods of bad weather, periods of decent weather- there's no gamblers fallacy to it.

Could happen 100 times in a row, or not be seen for years.
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Old 11-08-2012, 11:45 AM
 
10,102 posts, read 17,906,066 times
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We get Atlantic storms all the time -- Nor'easters are common. Hurricanes up here were never a once-in-a-century occurrence. There was the 1903 storm which made landfall in NJ, plus several which didn't land in NJ but traveled right along the coast and did damage -- 1985 (Gloria, hit Long Island) 1976 (Belle, hit Long Island) 1961 (Esther), 1960 (Donna, Long Island again) 1944 (darn that long island), 1938 (Long island AGAIN), 1936. More make landfall in NY than NJ(since NY sticks out into the Atlantic) Plus quite a few tropical storms.
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Old 11-08-2012, 12:46 PM
 
Location: alexandria, VA
16,361 posts, read 7,351,425 times
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Rising sea levels could become a problem. NY and other coastal areas could respond by building barriers to hold off the sea the way they do in Holland. I'm maybe the most skeptical cynical person on the planet but I'm starting to think there is something to this climate change business.

Last edited by r small; 11-08-2012 at 01:31 PM..
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Old 11-08-2012, 12:59 PM
 
Location: USA
8,012 posts, read 10,810,693 times
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nobody has loot to be saving these antique cities.
people are just going to let them run their course.


if anything, people will have no choice
but to move on and create new cities.
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Old 11-08-2012, 01:04 PM
 
669 posts, read 1,213,564 times
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People shouldn't just dismiss climate change and environmental issues as hysteria or some like hippie issues blowing things out of proportion of way of life is really changing the environment. Our sea levels are rising and were depleting our usable soil not mention the pollution from all the oil we rely on.

Hurricanes have hit this area before but that doesn't mean that we don't have an effect on it, but most importantly we need to make some changes to create more durable extreme weather proof infrastructure because like I said if this same storm or an even stronger one hit Miami it wouldn't have done anywhere close to the same amount of damage.
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Old 11-08-2012, 02:56 PM
 
3,808 posts, read 4,645,400 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joshd9124 View Post
People shouldn't just dismiss climate change and environmental issues as hysteria or some like hippie issues blowing things out of proportion of way of life is really changing the environment. Our sea levels are rising and were depleting our usable soil not mention the pollution from all the oil we rely on.

Hurricanes have hit this area before but that doesn't mean that we don't have an effect on it, but most importantly we need to make some changes to create more durable extreme weather proof infrastructure because like I said if this same storm or an even stronger one hit Miami it wouldn't have done anywhere close to the same amount of damage.
Sea levels rising a quarter of an inch in 20 years isn't going to put the whole city under, nor would a quarter of an inch less have stopped the subway systems from flooding.

Whatever solutions you do in NY are not NEARLY enough to combat the greater climate change that the Billions of Chinese and Indians can do in their part of the world.
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Old 11-09-2012, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Manhattan
24,485 posts, read 34,311,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
nobody has loot to be saving these antique cities.
people are just going to let them run their course.


if anything, people will have no choice
but to move on and create new cities.


Completely sensible and worthy of a rep point.
Rebuilding New Orleans in a hole next to the Gulf was a complete waste of money.
Sticking Battery Park City out into the Hudson atop a pile of mud was moronic.
But one thing is certain about Americans...they learn NOTHING from experience.
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Old 11-09-2012, 02:27 PM
 
669 posts, read 1,213,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WithDisp View Post
Sea levels rising a quarter of an inch in 20 years isn't going to put the whole city under, nor would a quarter of an inch less have stopped the subway systems from flooding.

Whatever solutions you do in NY are not NEARLY enough to combat the greater climate change that the Billions of Chinese and Indians can do in their part of the world.
I don't disagree with what you said it still doesn't mean we shouldn't make changes here, and when it comes to the city I am talking the city building better infrastructure to handle hurricanes the thing about rising sea levels was just in general for the whole world and it is a real problem.
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